Public Diplomacy Forum - USIA

Public Diplomacy Nationwide

Updated June 4, 1999

This table provides links to summaries of recent public diplomacy activities in different states. Newest entries are in bold.   USIS offices are the USIA field offices overseas,
the U.S. Information Service.
  
(See world regions below.)

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois

Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusettes
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana

Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania

Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

USIA is a foreign affairs agency whose purpose is to inform foreign citizens about America and its foreign policy. We regret that we are unable, therefore, to respond to general-information questions.

Send us updates about "citizen diplomacy" events in your hometown! Send email to let PDForum know of an international event you would like listed here. Include your town name, state, date of the event, and contact information. Public diplomacy needs public input!

News Releases: Go to USIA's News Releases for more program highlights.

For more information on programs mentioned here, see the USIA Homepage, www.usia.gov

Region-by-region Web sites are also available from the Department of Commerce's Trade Information Center for each region of the world, dedicated to helping business people export and conduct business in each region.


 


 



Program Summaries, by State:
 
 
 

ALABAMA

RUSSIAN MANAGERS IN HUNTSVILLE FOR TRAINING
The University of Alabama in Huntsville is hosting ten Presidential Management Training Initiative Russian managers for six-week business internships in Huntsville. The program is administered by USIA. (January 1999)


ALASKA


ARIZONA

RUSSIAN MANAGERS IN TUSCON
Pima Community College is hosting ten Presidential Management Training Initiative Russian managers for six-week business internships in Tucson. The program is administered by USIA. (January 1999)


ARKANSAS

UKRANIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN LITTLE ROCK
The Arkansas Council of International Visitors, in partnership with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Ukrainian business persons in Little Rock for five-week business internships. (January 1999)


CALIFORNIA

CITY MANAGER ESTABLISHES COMMUNITY POLICE LINKAGE
Salinas, California City Manager David Mora participated in a U.S. Speaker program for USIA's overseas office in Santiago on increasing community participation in local government. Mora's program included interviews with two print, two radio and two TV reporters. His audiences included two governors, a dozen mayors, a Carabineros general and one vice minister, along with hundreds of city and community group officials. One early result is a cooperative link established between Salinas city police and the Carabineros official charged with developing community-oriented policing practices in Chile. (May 1999)

FULBRIGHTER RETURNS TO MOROCCO WITH EXHIBIT ON RELIGIOUS TOLERANCE
A photography exhibition is attracting headlines in Morocco for its portrayal of Jewish-Muslim coexistence. The exhibit is the result of a collaboration between an American Fulbright grantee and a Moroccan photographer. Former Fulbrighter Sarah Levin worked with USIA's overseas office in Morocco and the Moroccan Ministry of Culture, as well as contacts from her 1997-98 grant period, to create a 100-photo display, "Jews Among Berbers: A Moroccan Portrait of Coexistence." The photos were exhibited April 5-15 in Rabat, garnering coverage from half a dozen Arabic and French publications and on local radio. Photos from the exhibit will be shown at the Judah Magnes Museum in Berkeley, CA and at the Beth Hetefutsoth Museum/The Museum of the Diaspora in Tel Aviv, Israel from June to September 1999. Ms. Levin, a freelance graphic designer, won a 9-month Fulbright research grant for the project, on which she collaborated with Moroccan photographer Elias Harrus. (April 1999)

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

ECOTOPICS INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE FOUNDER FEATURED ON WEB
U.S. Information Agency alumna Jo Campbell, based in the Northern California community of Willits, founded Ecotopics International News Service following her career with USIA. Her story is featured this month on USIA's Public Diplomacy Forum Web site. (Feburary 1999)

ISRAELI CABINET APPROVES LEGAL REFORMS SUGGESTED BY U.S. SPEAKER
A series of judicial reforms, approved by the Israeli cabinet in late December 1998, include several championed by Judge Clifford Wallace. USIA's branch office in Tel Aviv has brought Judge Wallace, an emeritus judge of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Diego, to Israel as a speaker several times since 1996. Judge Wallace has worked with Israeli judicial officials ranging from the President of the Supreme Court to district judges and court clerks on administration of justice issues. Through the new Cabinet-approved reform package Judge Wallace advocated, district courts now have taken on the appellate function formerly reserved for the Supreme Court. Jurisdiction of magistrate courts has also been extended to cover criminal cases. These reforms will help speed the processing of cases and make justice more accessible to ordinary citizens. (February 1999)

USIA ALUMNUS CREATES ENVIRONMENT CENTER IN CALCUTTA
The new Environmental Management Center (EMC), which was opened in Calcutta by the Indian Chamber of Commerce in December, is the brainchild of an International Visitor Program who credited his USIA-sponsored visit to the U.S. with helping him create the EMC. The grantee, the Chamber's Secretary General, took part in a 1996 IV project on "U.S. Trade Policies and the World Trade Organization." The program contained a component on how U.S. businesses were dealing with international and domestic environmental regulations. He said that his exposure to "the commendable work done in California to preserve and protect the environment" aided him in planning the EMC. The U.S. Agency for International Development and the United States-Asia Environmental Partnership have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Indian Chamber of Commerce to strengthen the EMC's technical and institutional capacities. Eight daily newspapers in East India reported on the opening of the EMC. (February 1999)

USIA ALUMNUS ADVOCATES U.S.-STYLE FEDERALISM FOR INDIA
An Indian Member of Parliament (MP) returned to Madras from a USIA-sponsored visit to the U.S. as a proponent of American-style federalism for India. While in the United States for an International Visitor program on "The U.S. Legislative Process," the MP filed stories on federalism for his party paper, "Sangoli." After returning to India, he wrote a six-part series for the paper and held a press conference in which he lauded the reservation of certain powers for the states in the U.S. and advocated greater devolution of powers to the states in India. The articles, along with describing his experiences in the U.S., repeatedly stated his conviction that there is much to emulate in the transparency and citizen participation of U.S. electoral politics. (February 1999)

RUSSIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN SACRAMENTO
Cal State Sacramento is hosting ten Presidential Management Training Initiative Russian managers for six-week business internships in Sacramento. The program is administered by USIA. (January 1999)

RUSSIAN ENTREPRENEURS IN HAYWARD FOR MARKET ECONOMY TRAINING
The San Francisco Chronicle reported that California State University at Hayward is hosting visiting Russian business people from January until March. The 10 Russian entrepreneurs will participate in a U.S. Information Agency program at CSU Hayward to train people for a market economy. The university will be cooperating with local businesses willing to share knowledge in accounting, foreign trade, investment banking, computer information systems, financial management and business planning and other areas. (January 1999)

ART MEETS BUSINESS IN SAN JOSE
Marian Liebowitz, Professor of Music and Coordinator of the Woodwind Department at San Diego State University, completed a successful two-week seminar on music as a business, sponsored by the USIA-supported Binational Center in San Jose, Costa Rica. Traveling under the auspices of the USIA Cultural Specialist Program, Ms. Liebowitz gave a thorough five-day workshop on marketing, promotion and fundraising for artists, and three two-hour seminars on topics as diverse as career development for soloists and ensembles, the outside world: how to attract mass media, write letters, and run a meeting, and the work environment: empresarios, the value of tickets and contracts. This combination of the practical and the artistic was an excellent demonstration of American approaches and values. (January 1999)

ASIAN FINANCIAL CRISIS
A New York-based correspondent for Japan's Kyodo News, spent three days in December in California's Sacramento Valley and San Francisco Bay area, intensively researching the state's agricultural and commercial fishing industries for an article series on the impacts in the U.S. of the Asia financial crisis. With assistance from the California Farm Bureau, USIA's New York Foreign Press Center arranged for the correspondent to meet with officials at the Department of Food and Agriculture, the Rice Industry Association, the Lodi Winegrape Commission, the Cherry Advisory Board, Blue Diamond Growers, and the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishers. He also toured a Farmington Fresh export facility, interviewed farmers and fishermen, and stayed overnight at a grape farm. High priority was placed on facilitating this individual journalist's research because of the importance of the U.S.-Japan bilateral and international economic issues covered. (December 1998)


COLORADO

PARTNERS OF THE AMERICAS SCHOOL EXCHANGE
USIS Brasilia provided support to the Colorado-Minas Gerais (Brazil) chapter of the Partners of the Americas by facilitating the Minas Gerais governor's visit to Denver, and the expansion of student and faculty exchanges between the states of Minas Gerais and Colorado. (1995)


CONNECTICUT

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HOSTS CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL CORRUPTION
The National Law Journal reported that, to explore the impact of bribery on the global economy, the University of Connecticut hosted a conference Nov. 13 and 14 on "Political Corruption in Market Democracies." Participants, estimated at 500, included law professors from the United States and abroad, foreign judges and government officials, and about 50 foreign attorneys currently in U.S. LL.M. programs. Funding was provided by the Open Society Institute and the U.S. Information Agency. Panels were assembled to address campaign financing in America, as well as corruption in the Third World and emerging democracies. One of the speakers was Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Conn., who has led the fight for campaign finance reform in Congress. The conference also featured Fritz Heimann, a lawyer for General Electric Co. and a founding member of Transparency International, or TI, a Berlin-based nonprofit committed to fighting corruption. Unlike U.S. companies, which are forbidden to pay bribes to foreign officials by the 1977 Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, foreign companies traditionally have been free to pay bribes -- and to deduct them as business expenses. Foreign countries are being encouraged to strengthen the rule of law. Some of the goals: guarantee the independence of the judiciary; create a mechanism for prosecuting corruption; and -- one other thing Americans take for granted -- guarantee the freedom of the press. (January 1999)

TEACHER TO OBSERVE EDUCATION IN JAPAN
The "Hartford Courant" reported that Susan O'Connell, third-grade teacher at Linden Street elementary school, recently was selected to participate in the Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program, a program that sends 600 teachers to Japan to study the country's culture and educational system for three weeks. In Japan, she will visit teachers and their classrooms. The trip is funded by the Japanese government, which launched the teacher program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the U.S. government-initiated Fulbright program -- an international exchange program set up in 1946 under congressional legislation introduced by J. William Fulbright of Arkansas during his service in the Senate. The program was designed to increase understanding of other cultures. In her application, O'Connell said she wanted to learn more about Japan's mathematics and science instruction, primarily because the country's students lead the world in their mathematics and science scores. (October 1998)


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

USIA CARRIES OUT COMMERCIAL LAW PROGRAMS IN UGANDA
USIA's branch office in Kampala, Uganda, completed several back-to-back rule-of-law programs. D.C. Superior Court judges Nan Shucker and Susan Winfield and commercial lawyer Marsha Sims were in Kampala through March 10 to help strengthen the judicial system's ability to deal with business disputes. Shuker and Winfield led sessions on mediation as a way to resolve disputes more expeditiously, while Sims did a workshop for the commercial division of Uganda's High Court and discussed the status of the fledgling securities market in Uganda with officials from the regulatory board, the Capital Markets Authority, and the Uganda Stock Exchange. The three also met twice with Uganda's Attorney General to follow up discussions they had during the AG's visit to Washington last fall. (March 1999)

ARMENIANS LEARN ABOUT U.S. BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS
Ten Armenians visited Washington in October, participants in a program co-sponsored by the Center for International Private Enterprise and the United States Information Agency to help businesses in other countries develop associations. After gaining its independence in 1991 when the Soviet Union fell, Armenia underwent economic and political turmoil, much of it surrounding a land dispute with its neighbor, Azerbaijan, over the Nagorno-Karabakh region. Though that situation has not been fully resolved, the Armenians who visited last week believe that the time is ripe for business rebuilding and look forward to creation of a new chamber of commerce in that country. (October 1998)


FLORIDA

CENTRAL EUROPEAN TIES CEMENTED BY JACKSONVILLE CLUB
Twenty-five alumni from the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce Foundation's Executive Education Program met in Bratislava on December 5 to establish the Central European Programs (CEP) Jacksonville Club. The club's mission is to sustain ties among CEP participants and to provide opportunities for information exchange and networking among Czech, Slovak and Hungarian members. Meeting on a quarterly basis, each time in a different CEP participating country, friends and business associates of alumni with mutual interests also will be invited to join. Special events and services will be offered, including training and relevant publications, and speakers will be invited to address the group. The Executive Education Program is administered by the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce Foundation through a grant from USIA's Office of Citizen Exchanges. (January 1999)

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL SHARES CULTURAL LESSONS
The St. Petersburg Times recently reported that some of her preconceived ideas about Japan changed after she spent three weeks in the country. In the 13 years she has served as an administrator, Madonna Wise has peeked into a lot of classrooms and seen the interaction between students and teachers when there's real learning going on. That intangible connection is something she can pick up on in an instant, Wise said, whether it's at her own school (West Zephyrhills Elementary, where she is principal) or in a Japanese village school that she had the opportunity to visit during a three-week stay in October. Wise's trip, to learn firsthand about education and Japanese culture, was paid for by a grant from the Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program. The program, funded by the Japanese government, was established three years ago to commemorate the 50th anniversary of another program - the U.S. Fulbright scholarship program. About 6,000 Japanese citizens have been brought to the United States for graduate education and research through the Fulbright program. The Institute of International Education, which administers the Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program in the United States, will send 5,000 teachers and administrators to Japan over the next five years. Wise, one of 200 educators chosen out of 2,700 applicants for the October trip, gives talks to students, teachers, and civic groups as a part of the program. For Wise, the visit to Japan was an eye-opening experience, one she was happy to share with her students and faculty at West Zephyrhills Elementary through daily e-mails. "You don't realize how many preconceived ideas you have," Wise said. (January 1999)

FORMER DIPLOMAT FULTON SPEAKS ON REINVENTING DIPLOMACY
The St. Petersburg Times reported that former associate director of the United States Information Agency Barry Fulton, spoke at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg on "Reinventing Diplomacy in the Information Age," as part of the college's International Relations and Global Affairs Speaker series. A former USIA career foreign service officer, Fulton was executive director of a study recently released by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and co-chaired by Hodding Carter and Richard Burt. The study examined the impact of new information technology on international relations. (November 1998)


GEORGIA

AFRICAN VISITOR RETURNS TO NIAMEY DETERMINED TO PURSUE DISTANCE EDUCATION
A recent participant in USIA's International Visitor Program, "Reshaping Higher Education In a Changing Society," is in charge of external relations for the University of Niger and will be part of any solutions to the severe financial problems facing the university. He brought back from the U.S. a trove of potentially fertile ideas. Among them were those on the legislative process and funding of education programs. He was amazed at the variety of educational approaches he encountered in the U.S. Distance learning in particular, as taught at Georgia State University, most attracted him and he will pursue a linkage with that institution. (March 1999)

ATLANTA PARTICIPATES IN ULSTER PEACEBUILDING
The Institute for Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University will conduct a training program in cooperation with the Atlanta Police Department for 15 members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary. The program will focus on community and police relations. (December 1998)


HAWAII

"VIETNAM-HAWAII EXECUTIVE TRAINING AND ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM" 
This program involved 40 Vietnamese educators and managers who, from October 20 to November 14, 1997, studied small business development, market economics, information technology, strategic management, and privatization from hand-picked experts of the University of Hawaii. This program, opened by U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam Peterson, resulted in an MOU that will not only increase institutional linkages between a key Vietnamese and American university, but also set the stage for Phase II of the project (May 16-June 30, 1998) that will bring six Vietnamese educators to Hawaii in a program designed to develop a university- level business management education curriculum in Vietnam. (November 1997)


IDAHO


ILLINOIS

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS TO ESTABLISH INTERN PROGRAM FOR MONGOLIAN JOURNALISTS
Michael Starr, chair of the Department of Radio and Television at Southern Illinois University participated in a USIA speaker program in Mongolia that may result in establishment of an intern program for Mongolian journalists at SIU. (June 1999)

EXCHANGE PROGRAM ALUM, VISITING EXPERT FOCUS OMANI ATTENTION ON Y2K
A conference organized by a participant in a recent USIA International Visitor program on the "millennium bug" has led to the formation of a team to help Oman's private sector deal with Y2K problems. Dr. Amer Al-Rawwas, who directs the Sultan Qaboos University Computer Center, put together the conference in order to increase Y2K awareness among government officials. Dr. Ahmed Kassem, a USIA-sponsored speaker from the University of Illinois-Chicago's Computer Center, delivered the conference's keynote address on April 11. His high-level audience reacted vocally to his negative assessment of Middle Eastern countries' Y2K compliance. Soon thereafter, the Minister of National Economy formed a "reaction team" to work with the private sector on Y2K issues. (April 1999)

RUSSIAN NGO PROFESSIONALS IN CHICAGO FOR TRAINING
Heartland International, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Russian non-governmental orgazniation professionals in Chicago for three-week internships. (January 1999)

REP. WELLER LEADS DELEGATION TO RUSSIA
Copley News reported that Rep. Jerry Weller, R-Morris, recently led a week-long trip to Russia, to "meet with parliament leaders and others as part of an international political exchange program. The trip was funded by The American Council of Young Political Leaders, a nonprofit group funded by the U.S. Information Agency and private citizens. The bipartisan group aimed at helping "emerging leaders," ages 25 to 40, to experience the political and cultural dynamics of others countries." (January 1999)


RETURN TO THE TOP



INDIANA

FULBRIGHTER FOUNDS ECONOMIC CASE STUDY CENTER IN SLOVENIA
Former U.S. Fulbrighter Lisa Blonder has been instrumental in getting the "Case Study Center" off the ground. The Center, funded by USIA, Indiana University, the British "Know How Fund" and the University of Ljubljana, is adding an important aspect to the teaching of business and economics at the university level in Slovenia, previously heavily theoretical. The Center provides catalogues of international teaching cases, industry notes, and technical notes from various centers around the world, as well as materials on case study writing and teaching methods. Its Curriculum Consulting Service, On-line Internet Search Services and CD ROMs help students, faculty and professionals locate materials to fit specific educational or assessment needs. The Center is now self-supporting and an integral part of the University of Ljubljana School of Economics. (April 1999)

PROFESSOR SPURS WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM IN BELARUS
Professional In Residence Colette Morrow, director of Women's Studies programs at Purdue, gave a presentation on "Diversity Among Women's Studies Programs in the United States: Administration and Development in a Multi-Cultural Society" during the plenary session of a conference organized by the Center for Gender Studies at "Envila," a non-governmental women's institute in Minsk, and co-sponsored by USIA and the International Research and Exchanges Board. Murrow also made presentations on "Recruiting and Retraining Female Students In Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Insight from the United States" and "Women's Writing in English Renaissance Literature." Ms. Morrow returned home with a documentary on Belarusian women, produced by a local women's film studio, to use during classes at Purdue, and Purdue and "Envila" are now at work on a university linkages project. (January 1999)

AMERICAN JURIST AIDS PALESTIAN JUDICIAL DEVELOPMENT
The "Indiana Lawyer" reported that Judge James Redwine contributed to the Palestian Authority's efforts to devise a unified court. Redwine, a Posey Circuit Court judge, served as a faculty member during a two-week visit by eight influential West Bank and Gaza judges at the National Judicial College in Reno, Nev. The intent of the visit was to assist the Palestinian judges in establishing a judicial college and to learn alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and mediation techniques to combat the country's tremendous caseload. The three-phase program was funded by a grant from the U.S. Information Agency. In the first phase, Robert Payant and Peggy Vidal of the National Judicial College visited Palestine to determine exactly what their judges needed to learn most. The issue of mediation surfaced, and Redwine was added to the faculty roster. He became one of the most integral players and was the only faculty member to stay in Reno for the entire length of the fortnight. The United States was deliberately chosen as the nation to instruct the Palestinian contingent. This country's system is also based partially on the British system. (October 14, 1998)



IOWA

ARGENTINE POET PRAISES IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP
Fabian Casas, one of Argentina's most prominent poets and an editor of the literary and cultural supplements of leading daily Clarin, said his participation in the Iowa Writers Workshop was one of the most professionally significant experiences of his life. Casas, who had never been to the United States, used the workshop to complete a book of translations of U.S. poets, a volume of his own poetry, and a short novel. Casas gave top marks to the workshops on translation and poetry, the facilities of the University of Iowa, the administrators of the program, and his fellow participants in the Writers Workshop. At the university Casas taught two classes on Argentine poets, and during a visit to Portland, Maine, he read his poetry at an arts festival. (May 1999)

GEORGIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN KELLOGG FOR TRAINING
Iowa Resources for International Service, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Georgian business persons in Kellogg for five-week business internships. (January 1999)

MOLDOVAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN DES MOINES FOR TRAINING
The Iowa Council for International Understanding, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Moldovan business persons in Des Moines for five-week business internships. (January 1999)

ARMENIANS STUDY DEMOCRACY WITH UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
The Associated Press reported on a grant from the U.S. Information Agency to introduce the basics of democracy to visiting Armenian educators and to develop a civics course to take back to their students. In June 1997, University of Iowa professors went to Armenia for interviews resulting in recommendations to meet the need for a civics course and a need to develop a civics handbook for elementary students. Armenian educators also will work with teachers from Iowa City's public schools to learn creative ways to teach the lessons. (November 1998)


KANSAS

ASSISTANCE AWARDS WON BY KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENTS
M2 Presswire reported that three Kansas State University graduate students from Korea were selected to receive grants from the Korean Student Assistance Awards Program for the 1998-99 academic year. The $5,000 scholarships were funded by the United States- Korea Business Council and its members, the Korea Society and the Korean-American community. The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Information Agency provided administrative support for the Korean Student Assistance Awards Program, under the authority of the Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961. Recipients were doctoral students from the department of economics and from the College of Human Ecology (textile science). The Korean Student Assistance Awards Program was designed to support students affected by the current economic crisis in Korea. (November 1998)


KENTUCKY

USIS PARIS SUPPORTS FRENCH-AMERICAN CITY TO CITY RELATIONSHIP
USIS Paris gave facilitative assistance to Governor Paul Patton of Kentucky and his delegation of fifty. The group traveled to Nantes on December 11 to witness the casting of a 66,000 pound Millennium bell, which the Governor called a symbol of a French American collaborative effort to inaugurate a century of peace -- unlike the current century of war. It will be rung for the first time January 1, 2000 in Newport, Kentucky. USIS assisted at the ceremonies, the press conference, and Mayor's reception to support this French/American city to city relationship of goodwill, understanding, and commerce. The event received widespread positive press coverage. (December 1998)


LOUISIANA

CHILEAN INDIGENOUS LEADER RETURNS FROM SUCCESSFUL EXCHANGE PROGRAM
A USIA International Visitor grantee, leader of the Mapuche Nehuen indigenous rights NGO and a Chilean participant in a September group project on grassroots democracy, told of profound changes in his perceptions of U.S. society based on his trip, and of his eagerness to begin applying to his own advocacy work some of the lessons he learned from U.S. NGOs. He was most impressed by the strength of America's democracy ("thriving") and its NGOs, describing them as far more specialized, professional, effective and focused on practical change than those in Chile. He said he learned that "what is important is not just to protest, but to propose." He repeatedly returned to the issue of how to exercise influence successfully and how he hoped his group could emulate the success of American advocacy groups. The visitor also expressed his surprise at the diversity of U.S. society, remarking that he had regarded as fact erroneous stereotypes about the U.S. Visits to bilingual schools and a Choctaw community helped him see how diverse groups in the U.S. not only mutually tolerate but also respect each other, how all contribute to the strength of U.S. culture, and how the plurality of cultures in the U.S. is not seen as a divisive threat to society. (December 1998)

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC REWRITES LEGAL CODES IN JUDICIAL REFORM MOVE
The Dominican Attorney General, the former District Attorney of Santo Domingo (and present head of the D.R.'s best law school) , the Vice-President of the Supreme Court, the heads of two committees presently rewriting the Dominican legal codes and three staff members of the Presidential Commission for Support of Judicial Reform spent two weeks in New Orleans at a Public Law Center program on code writing techniques. The participation of these individuals in this program was a direct result of the visit of nine judges from Louisiana last March, which was organized by the Public Law Center and funded by USIA. The American judges met with the five Dominican commissions that are rewriting the codes. The commission members were surprised to learn that they knew so little about code writing and said they hoped to attend a workshop at Tulane University in this area. Funds for their New Orleans program were provided by The Presidential Commission. The Dominican code writers are excited about all they have learned from this association. (December 1998)


MAINE

 COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS CONTINUES IMPACT IN MOLDOVA
USIS Chisinau, Moldova has dedicated considerable effort to the "Community Connections" law program in March 1998. A pre-departure orientation opened by Ambassador Stewart was held March 27 for 30 business program participants going to Louisville and Columbus. On March 30, a recent alumnus of the public administration group hosted by Project Harmony in Portland, Maine, published an admiring article, "Bridges of Understanding and Cooperation," presenting the program from pre-departure to debriefing, highlighting American patriotism, the warm welcome his group received at Maine's state legislature, the importance of local administrative autonomy in the U.S., and the role of autonomous local school boards. Above all, he stressed that the program has resulted in a close partnership between Moldova and Maine and plans for future cooperation. (March 1998)


MARYLAND

USIA OVERSEAS OFFICE IN MOSCOW MARKS PEACE CORPS DAY
USIA coordinated publicity for and Russian media coverage of the video conference that celebrated the 38th anniversary of the Peace Corps by linking students from Southern Middle School in Lusby, Maryland with students from Penza and their Peace Corps Volunteer teacher. Ambassador Collins opened the video conference, in which Peace Corps Director Mark Gearan, Secretary of Education Richard Riley, Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna Shalala, and Lieutenant Governor of Maryland Kathleen Kennedy Townsend participated. (April 1999)

U.S. SPEAKER PROMOTES IPR REFORMS IN INDONESIA
University of Baltimore law professor William Fryer, an expert on intellectual property rights protection, helped "train the trainers" during a week-long USIA Speaker program in Indonesia. Fryer led a five-day seminar on IPR, co-sponsored by the University of Indonesia, which brought 25 law faculty from major universities nationwide to learn how to teach about IPR enforcement at a time of rapid political and economic reform. In addition, Fryer addressed the Indonesian Intellectual Property Society (IIPS) and held several informal discussions on IPR trends with GOI officials and business leaders, including the Director of the National Copyright Office and country directors for the Motion Picture Association (MPA) and Microsoft Corporation. (March 1999)

USIA SHARES EXPERTISE IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
English teaching specialist and USIA foreign service member Damon Anderson spoke on "Writing for Publication" to faculty and graduate degree candidates at the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus, including international students from Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Nicaragua.. Listeners were walked through the process of writing for and being published in "English Teaching Forum," a USIA periodical distributed solely overseas. Mr. Anderson is Chief of the Materials Branch of USIA's Division of English Language Programs. (October 1998)

AMERICAN AND BRAZILIAN JURISTS SWAP IDEAS
Ten judges from Brazil visited Baltimore June 27-July 5 for a week-long judicial exchange program hosted by the University of Baltimore Law School, under a grant from USIA's Office of Citizen Exchanges. The program brought together judges, court officials and academics to discuss issues such as the American judicial concept of precedent -- a concept that Brazil's justice system does not employ and the lack of which has overwhelmed the courts with cases, many of them hinging on legal issues that already have been decided. Participants said there is a movement in Brazil's national congress to reform the judicial system and to establish the concept of precedent. Later this year (December), American jurists and scholars will travel to Brazil for similar meetings, and participants will produce two books or lengthy articles (in English and Portuguese) to recount the ideas and proposals discussed during the exchange. The July 9, 1998, Washington Post issue carried an article on the program (Montgomery County section), in which Judge Ellen Gracie Northfleet, a federal appellate judge from southern Brazil, was quoted as saying, "I believe this group can make a real difference." As part of their week in the U.S., the Brazilians visited the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, and the administrative office of U.S. Courts in the District of Columbia, and the Montgomery County District Court. (July 1998) 


MASSACHUSETTS

RUSSIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN AMHERST
The Institute for Training and Development, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Russian business persons in Amherst for five-week business internships. (January 1999)

REPUBLIC OF GEORGIA STUDENTS IN LOWELL
Two students from the Republic of Georgia (cities of Signagi and Tbilisi) WILL spend one semester attending Lowell High School through the School Partnership Program. This project is organized by the Frank Foundation. (January 1999)

BOSTON COLLEGE TO HELP TRAIN NORTHERN IRELAND ASSEMBLY
The Chronicle of Higher Education recently reported that Boston College is doing its part for the cause of peace in Northern Ireland. The college's Irish Institute is providing special training for the elected members of the new Northern Ireland Assembly and its staff through a special U.S.-sponsored program. The assembly was established last spring under what has come to be known as the "Good Friday peace accord," which provided a political framework designed to bring an end to the conflict that has long divided the British province. The assembly will include representatives of all political parties, which have indicated that they support the new training program. The college received a $ 1-million grant from the United States Information Agency to finance the 14-month program, which is called "The Task of Government." The college also is contributing funds to the project, and academic and administrative resources to support it. The training sessions will be held at the Irish Institute as well as in Northern Ireland. The program will include visits to local, state, and federal legislative offices and government agencies in the United States, as well as workshops and discussions with academic experts. (January 1999)

RUSSIAN MEDIA PERSONALITIES AT FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE
ADWEEK reported that Elena Shmoulevich and Natalia Michina, producers and on-air hosts with Grand TV, a privately owned station in Kirov, Russia, visited Boston as part of a USIA education grant administered by Fitchburg State College. Michina helms a Martha Stewart-type show about interior design, child rearing and healthcare. Shmoulevich oversees a financial news program similar to PBS-TV's Wall Street Week in Review. The two visitED Ingalls Advertising, Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos and NBC affiliate WHDH-TV, all in Boston, for a crash course in American commercial production, media planning and client relations. Michina noted the U.S. has more advanced technology but said extremely hard work typifies the media industry on both continents. (January 1999)


MICHIGAN

GERMAN STUDENTS HOSTED IN MARQUETTE
The Associated Press reported on the German-American Partnership Program, sponsored by the Goethe Institute and the U.S. Information Agency. Twenty-six German exchange students spent four weeks in the Marquette area, under the program, soaking up the American experience. The students came from the Gymnasium Ernestinum in Celle, a city of about 80,000 in northern Germany, accompanied by an English and physical education teacher and a math and politics teacher. After a short trip to Chicago, students lived with host families here and attended Marquette Senior High School. This summer, about the same number of Marquette students will spend about a month in Europe and Celle as part of a counter visit. (December 1998)

DEARBORN SISTER CITY TIES WITH BRAZIL
Dearborn Mayor Michael Guido visited Brazil recently, as reported by the Detroit News, to weld economic and cultural ties during discussions about a sister city plan. His trip was cosponsored by USIA, Sister Cities International, and the U.S. Departments of State and Commerce. (December 1998)

MICHIGAN INSTRUCTOR URGES ETHIOPIA TO START STOCK MARKET
"The Detroit News" reported that Eastern Michigan University finance professor Asrat Tessema worked with and encouraged entrepreneurs on the idea of setting up a stock market in this ancient land, one of the poorest countries in the world. A fatalistic attitude prevails, not surprising in a 2,000-year-old country that is struggling with one of the worst infant mortality rates on earth and a subsistence economy where the per capita income is a dismal $110. In addition, the concept of a stock market -- where individual investors buy shares or ownership in companies -- is largely a foreign notion in Africa. Of the 55 countries on the African continent, only a dozen, including South Africa and Botswana, have developed economies to the point of buying and selling stocks and shares. Tessema argued that a stock market is critical to help alleviate an acute shortage of capital in such markets. Tessema and his family lived for a year in Ethiopia, from August 1997 to June 1998, after he was awarded a $ 73,000 grant by the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board and the United States Information Agency. Tessema lectured at Addis Ababa University and worked with local businesses during his stay. (November 1998)


MINNESOTA

OBERSTAR UNDERTAKES MISSION TO CHINA
The U.S. State Department and the American Ambassador to China, Jim Sasser, requested Congressman Jim Oberstar to undertake a mission to China to promote further expansion of the U.S.China bilateral trade agreement. Oberstar was scheduled to meet with air carriers, airport authorities, and government leaders regarding civil aviation and trade policy matters. He is also to give lectures on the U.S. Congress, foreign policy and democracy in the United States. The U.S. Information Agency sponsored the trip, including stops in Shanghai and Beijing. (January 1999)

PROJECT ENCOURAGES NEW OPENNESS
The Samara (Russia) - Minnesota Public Administration Program, funded through a grant from the USIA Office of Citizen Exchanges to the Lawyers Alliance for World Security (LAWS), has resulted in a new openness in the Samara administration's dealings with the public and with U.S. organizations active in the region. The LAWS project goal was to improve the business and investment climate in the region through a series of exchanges and training programs for regional administration and business leaders. One participant, a deputy governor who visited Minnesota in September 1998 for consultations and to participate in a state trade fair, had nothing but praise for the experience, both the practical aspects and the getting to know America portion. In addition, thanks in part to work under the grant, the Samara administration recently made its budget available on the Internet for public perusal -- a rare openness for a Russian government institution. As a result of the September program in Minnesota, which included senior regional finance and economics department officials, fiscally responsible regional economic forecasts for 1999 were prepared, and it is clear that participants came away with new ideas that they are applying in managing their government finances. The economists have proposed four budgets with varying figures depending on predicted rates of inflation. The documents, post reports, are controversial because the drafters directly contradict federal calculations in predicting such key indicators as the minimum inflation rate next year. (January 1999)

MOLDOVAN BROADCASTERS TAKE FIRST STEP TO FORM ASSOCIATION
As part of the USIA Citizen Exchanges Program "Strengthening Independent Broadcasting in Moldova," USIA's field office in Chisinau hosted its second American specialist, Jim Wychor, a former executive director of the Minnesota Broadcasters' Association. His experience proved useful to Moldovan broadcasters at this stage of deciding upon goals and structure of their own organization. The final session produced draft by-laws and three broadcasters were selected for travel to the U.S. to learn more about American broadcast associations. This program comes at a time when the governmental audio-visual body is staking out its own authority. Perhaps the most important accomplishment of this program is that ethnic Romanian and Russian broadcasters recognized common interests and benefits from working together rather than seeing each other only as commercial competitors. (December 1999)


MISSISSIPPI


MISSOURI

MISSOURI HOSTS NATO WELCOME OF THREE NEW MEMBERS
On March 12 at a ceremony at the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, Secretary of State Albright welcomed Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic as new NATO members. USIA Worldnet TV carried the ceremony live and assisted the State Department to arrange an interview with the Secretary for three journalists from the new member states. Coverage by the region's media of the accession event focused on the Secretary's emphasis on the "open door" policy toward additional members. Poland Public TV One's carried its correspondent's interview with the Secretary on the late evening news and again with other footage from Independence on a public affairs program. In Prague, more than 100 Czech guests from ministries, the Parliament, Senate, military, universities, and think tanks gathered at the USIS American Center where they watched the Worldnet feed live, many with teary eyes. Czech radio broadcast live from the Center, culminating a day of NATO broadcasts from around the country, including a prerecorded message from Ambassador Shattuck. Hungarian State TV made the interview with the Secretary its lead feature on the weekly political news show "A Het" (The Week in Review) on Saturday. Romanian and Estonian State Televisions included highlights of the Worldnet coverage in their prime time news on Friday. (April 1999)

"Missouri Fulbrighter Contributes To Understanding Of American Media in Israel and Egypt"
Professor Edmund Lambeth of the University of Missouri recently completed ten months at the University of Haifa pursuing research in "Nurturing a Free Press: The Roles of Ethics, Media Criticism and Journalism Education." During his stay in Israel, Prof. Lambeth lectured and participated in several academic seminars, thus enriching the University of Haifa's relatively young Communications Department. At the beginning of his stay, he was also invited to lecture at a seminar for senior Arab economics and business reporters at the Al-Ahram Regional Press Institute in Cairo. Prof. Lambeth's studies focused on the role of the English-language press in Israel. He delivered the opening lecture of a series of talks sponsored by the Fulbright Foundation on the topic, "The North American Press Under Assault." The Fulbrighter's stay in Israel not only enhanced his own research but significantly contributed to his hosts' understanding of the American media and of current American scholarship in the study of the press. (July 1998)


MONTANA

"Russian Contingent visits Ophir School at Lone Peak Lookout"
Ophir School children had the rare opportunity to meet with a group of Russians from St. Petersburg who are in the United States as part of a diplomatic exchange funded by the United States Information Agency. Big Sky is just one of the many stops the group will make during their month long journey, including Washington DC, Atlanta, Williamsburg, VA, and New York City. The visitors are touring the country in an effort to gain more knowledge about the benefits of commercial tourism and electronic communication. The organization has been working closely with the Montana Center for International Visitors (MCIV) to develop Internet links with schools around the world. (1997)


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NEBRASKA

"NEBRASKA TRADE MISSIONS"
USIS Buenos Aires provided press support and faciltative assistance for Nebraska Governor Benjamin Nelson and a Nebraska trade mission to Argentina in February 1997. USIS Brasilia supported Governor Nelson and the trade mission when it traveled to Brazil. In Brazil, USIS arranged for a media interview and a 30-minute taped presentation on Nebraska's agricultural technologies for broadcast by Brazil's Rural TV channel. (February 1997)


NEVADA


NEW HAMPSHIRE

AUTHOR SPURS DISCUSSION WITH HIS OUTLOOK ON ISLAM
The Boston Globe recently reported that Ccvil engineer Mohammad Shahrour made waves throughout the Arab world with three books about Islam. His first book, "The Book and the Qur'an" published in 1990, sold out in its first printing in Damascus, followed by a reprinting and a Beirut edition in 1992. In Syria, 13,000 copies have sold, and part of the 15,000 copies sold of the Lebanese edition have found their way to the Arab Gulf. Despite a ban in Egypt, 3,000 copies have sold. The book was banned in Saudi Arabia, where 10,000 copies are circulating. Invited to the United States under the auspices of the US Information Agency, Shahrour recently traveled to New Hampshire. After spending two days at Dartmouth, he was guest of honor for a luncheon lecture sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council and Bell Atlantic as part of the council's "Many Faces of God" reading series. While in this country, Shahrour examined the impact of religion on U.S. culture and politics, and to talk with theologians and other community members about how to promote tolerance and dialogue between different religious groups. (January 1999)


NEW JERSEY

USIA VOLUNTARY VISITOR PROGRAM "CHANGES LIFE" FOR MEXICAN COMPOSER
Composer Daniel Catán, winner of the 1998 Placido Domingo Award for his two operas, credits his 1991 Voluntary Visitor program with changing the course of his life. Although Catán had studied at Princeton University, he lacked American contacts in the music world. His Voluntary Visitor trip created these important contacts and led to the staging of the first Mexican opera ever in the United States, Catán's "Rappaccini's Daughter." He said that Hispanic communities in the U.S. are proud that a Mexican composer has achieved such success, and Catán often speaks to Latino communities to reinforce the positive image Latinos can have of themselves. In addition to enhancing Catán's career with the U.S. staging of "Daughter" and his second opera, "Florencia en el Amazonas," to critical and commercial success, his program created increased institutional contact between U.S. and Mexican opera companies. Catán is now working on his third opera, to be staged in Washington, D.C., with Placido Domingo. "Without the Voluntary Visitor experience," he said, "I would not be where I am today." (May 1999)

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

ARTICLE ON EXPERIENCE IN SERBIA PUBLISHED IN AMERICAN JOURNALISM REVIEW
The Jan/Feb '99 issue of American Journalism Review includes an article, "Cracking Down," by USIA Professional In Residence Jerome Aumente, who organized broadcasting workshops in five regions of Serbia this fall. The article details Aumente's exposure during his USIA program to the "guerrilla tactics" used by Milosevic in his crackdown on independent broadcast media and discusses how Serbian broadcasters began to "pry information from government sources, conduct more probing interviews, launch investigative projects, and produce sharp broadcasts with limited resources." The article highlights support of Serbia's independent media by USIA and other American organizations such as Soros, Freedom Forum, IREX and Committee to Protect Journalists. Dr. Aumente is professor of journalism and director of Rutgers' Journalism Resources Institute. (January 1999)

MANALAPAN WOMAN RECEIVES FULBRIGHT GRANT
The Asbury Park Press recently reported that Sarah Nilsen, a student at the University of Southern California School of Cinema and Television in Los Angeles, was awarded a Fulbright grant to conduct research in film studies at the University of Toronto. Nilsen graduated from Manalapan High School in 1985. She attended Dartmouth college, Hanover, N.H., the American Film Institute, Hollywood, Calif., and the University of Southern California, where she completed her doctorate. The Fulbright Program, America's flagship educational exchange program, is sponsored by the U.S. Information Agency, an independent foreign affairs agency within the executive branch of the government. USIA promotes mutual understanding among nations and peoples through a number of educational exchange activities. It explains and supports U.S. foreign policy through a wide range of information programs. Nilsen is one of about 2,000 U.S. grantees who will travel abroad for the 1998-1999 academic year through the Fulbright Program. The program was established in 1946 under Congressional legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas. Its aim is to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. (January 1999)

KOREAN MAYORS STUDY U.S. LOCAL GOVERNMENT
A delegation of Korean mayors participated in a recent program conducted by Temple University through a grant from USIA's Office of Citizen Exchanges. After a week-long workshop on American state and local government, run by Temple University's Center for the Study of Federalism, the delegation visited Washington, D.C., New Orleans, and Denver. Organizers, who called the program Aa great success, also reported that the Korean mayors have high interest in the follow-up conference to be held in Seoul during April 1999. (January 1999)


NEW MEXICO

JOURNALISM AND LAW CONFERENCE IN RIGA, LATVIA
A three-day USIA speaker program in Riga brought an American expert on journalism and the law together with key Latvian media contacts concerned with improving professional standards for journalists and developing democratic controls to regulate television violence. Professor Steven Pasternack, Chairman of the New Mexico State University Department of Journalism and Mass Communications, gave a workshop on journalistic ethics and the Internet to University of Latvia graduate students, presented a seminar on TV violence and journalistic standards for broadcasters, reporters and news editors hosted by the Latvian equivalent of the FCC, and had individual consultations with the General Director of Latvian National Television and the Managing Director of one of the country's largest and newest newspaper groups. A former Fulbright professor at the Latvian National University in 1993, Dr. Pasternack also delivered a critique of recent U.S. coverage of President Clinton to an audience of Latvian Fulbright alumni and media professionals at the USIA Riga office's Information Resource Center. (April 1999)

NEW MEXICO STRENGTHENS TIES WITH MEXICAN LEGISLATORS
The "Albuquerque Journal" reported that Sen. Pauline B. Eisenstadt, Democrat from Corrales, was invited to join legislators for a study tour of Mexico or two weeks in November. The group will visit Guadalajara, Monterrey, and Mexico City, to discuss issues of mutual concern, such as economic development, immigration and education, with their Mexican counterparts. The tour's goal is to foster longterm relationships between U.S. and Mexican state legislators and staff. It is the second phase of a two-way exchange. In September, a delegation of Mexican legislators visited the United States and stopped in Santa Fe to meet with Eisenstadt and other New Mexican lawmakers. The tour is funded by the U.S. Information Agency and coordinated by the National Conference of State Legislatures, on whose executive board Eisenstadt served for three years. (October 1998)


NEW YORK

USIA SPEAKER GIVES COURSE AT ESTONIAN SCHOOL OF DIPLOMACY
Prof. John Micgiel, Director of the East Central European Center at Columbia University, taught a mini-course on "The Making of U.S. Foreign Policy" at the Estonian School of Diplomacy. The School is housed in the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and its students, involved in international affairs at the MFA and other ministries, sign an agreement to work for their government for 2 years after completing course work. Prof. Micgiel's course dealt with the roles of the Congress and the Executive Branch, public opinion, the media, interest groups, think tanks, and the Departments of State, Defense, the CIA, and the NSC in the formulation of U.S. policy. The course also looked at U.S. policy toward East and Central Europe and NATO enlargement. (April 1999)

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

USIA PROMOTES LEGAL REFORM IN FAMILY LAW IN MAURITIUS
USIA's branch office in Port Louis, Mauritius, arranged the speaker program of Judge Marjory Fields, Judge of the Family Court of New York State. The program was a follow-up to Fields's successful program in January 1998. Fields met with the Chief Justice and his staff on how to better implement the recently enacted domestic violence law. She also conducted a two-day workshop with the Ministry of Women, Family Welfare and Child Development, which also included police officers and probations' staff. Fields covered subjects such as procedures for interviewing victims, case monitoring, tracking offenders, and assessment of cases after court orders. The program promoted better conduct of the Ministry in dealing with domestic violence cases and the better implementation of the recently enacted domestic violence act within the Ministry and NGOs. (March 1999)

COLUMBIA PROFESSORS OFFERS FOREIGN POLICY COURSE IN ESTONIA
USIA's branch office in Estonia sponsored Professor John Micgiel, Director of the East Central European Center at Columbia University, to teach a mini-course on "The Making of U.S. Foreign Policy" at the Estonian School of Diplomacy. The School is housed in the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and its students, involved in international affairs at the MFA and other ministries, sign an agreement to work for the GOE for 2 years after completing course work. Prof. Micgiel's course dealt with the roles of the Congress and the Executive Branch, public opinion, the media, interest groups, think tanks, and the Departments of State, Defense, the CIA, and the NSC in the formulation of U.S. policy. The course also looked at U.S. policy toward East and Central Europe and NATO enlargement. (February 1999)

RUSSIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN SYRACUSE
The International Center of Syracuse, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Russian business persons in Syracuse for five-week business internships. (January 1999)

RUSSIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN BINGHAMTON
Broome Community College, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Russian business persons in Binghamton for five-week business internships. (January 1999)

MEDIA TOUR OF HARLEM
Twenty-three journalists from sixteen countries took part in a media tour of Harlem organized by USIA's New York Foreign Press Center. The tour themes were Harlem's economic revitalization and its rich cultural heritage. In the morning, journalists met Lloyd Williams of the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce and visited the world-famous Apollo Theater. To get a taste of Harlem's increasingly multi-cultural character, the group ate lunch at a restaurant featuring African and French-African cuisine. In the afternoon the group met with the Chief of Staff of Congressman Charles Rangel's office, Reverend Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, Howard Dodson, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Deborah C. Wright, President and CEO of the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone and Development Corporation. The journalists were surprised to learn that despite a negative image, actual crime in Harlem is lower than in most parts of New York City. They were equally impressed with real economic progress already achieved and the ambitious plans of the community leaders they met to continue infrastructure renovation and development both to attract new business and residents and to make the community an attractive and welcoming place for visitors, both domestic and foreign. (December 1998)

SUPPORT FOR Y2K COORDINATORS CONFERENCE AT THE U.N.
Emphasizing the high priority which the U.S. government and American businesses place on Year 2000 Computer Conversion efforts, USIA's New York Foreign Press Center organized a series of briefings December 9-10 timed to coincide with reporters' coverage of the December 11 United Nations Conference on Y2K. Briefings December 9 and 10 at the Securities Industry Association and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York informed 11 journalists from Japan, Korea, Finland, Spain, Canada, and Malaysia of the preparations being taken by the American securities and banking industries to handle the century date change problems. The New York Foreign Press Center also sponsored a December 10 Press Conference, attended by over 20 foreign news organizations, which featured John Koskinen, Assistant to the President and Chair of the President's Council on Y2K Conversion, Ambassador Ahmad Kamal (chairman of the U.N. Working Group on Informatics) and the 9 other members of the U.N. Y2K Conference's "Friends of the Chair" organizing group. (December 1998)


NORTH CAROLINA

DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT SEEKS TIES WITH MEXICO
USIA's overseas office in Mexico helped Duke University initiate a more active relationship with Mexico. Ambassador Davidow recently hosted a luncheon at which Duke's president, Nannerl Keohane, met with most of the rectors of leading Mexican universities. The highlight of the lunch was the signing of an agreement in which Duke has committed to providing tuition waivers to three Mexican Fulbright grantees. (May 1999)

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

RUSSIAN MANAGERS IN CHARLOTTE
The International House of Metrolina is hosting ten Presidential Management Training Initiative Russian managers for six-week business internships in Charlotte. The program is administered by USIA. (January 1999)

USIS SOUTH AFRICA ADDRESSES CRIME, A MAJOR CONCERN OF THE NATION
As part of USIS South's ongoing efforts to focus on the problem of crime, Harvey McMurray, former Washington, DC police officer and currently a professor of criminal justice at North Carolina Central University, traveled to Johannesburg from Uganda, where he is a Fulbright Senior Scholar, for a five-day South African program. After participating in the International Conference for Crime Prevention Partnerships in Johannesburg 27-30 October, he met with the project manager and staff of the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR), Law Faculty and students at Vista University in Soweto, Rand Afrikaans University in Johannesburg, Police Officers and social workers of the Child Protection Unit, and Crime Prevention NGOs and community leaders at the USIS Soweto. Professor McMurray delivered a paper on alternative forms of justice that was well received by the conference participants; the post-conference USIS program gave McMurray the opportunity to interact with the community, the police, and NGOs, all of whom are presently discouraged by the apparent ineffectiveness and slow pace of community policing strategies. In some lively and stimulating exchanges, McMurray was able to offer alternative strategies. (December 1998)


NORTH DAKOTA


OHIO

CINCINNATI PROFESSORS LECTURE IN TURKEY, NEPAL, LITHUANIA
The Cincinnati Enquirer recently reported that two University of Cincinnati professors traveled recently to give lectures commemorating the 50th anniversary of the United Nation's adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The anniversary was December 10, 1998. Law professor Bert Lockwood is visiting Sri Lanka, Nepal and Lithuania. Political science professor Howard Tolley is visiting Istanbul and Turkey. Their presentations to parliamentarians, party and government officials, attorneys, students and faculty and other groups are sponsored by the U.S. Information Agency. (January 1999)



OKLAHOMA

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

 "TULSA HOSTS NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR INTERNATIONAL VISITORS ANNUAL CONFERENCE"
More than 300 nationwide members of local Councils for International Visitors attended the National Council for International Visitors’ (NCIV) national conference in Tulsa, March 26-28. The Oklahoma Secretary of Commerce was among many state and local officials who participated in the conference -- heightening the visibility of USIA's International Visitor (IV) Program and the Tulsa Global Alliance across the state. Local IV Program interlocutors from business, government and academia gained a greater appreciation of the breadth and significance of their involvement in the IV Program as they joined USIA officers and CIV volunteers from around the country in an impressive set of thematic events at the Gilcrease Museum. The local media (electronic and print) widely covered the conference. (March 1998)


OREGON

LEWIS AND CLARK COLLEGE AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LATVIA FORM TIES
University affiliations between Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College and the University of Latvia, a USIA-sponsored initiative, gathered support from AID and SOROS Foundation and individual faculty support to strengthen the University of Latvia Law School. A Latvian graduate law student, Edgars Dzering will spend one semester at Northwestern School of Law in order to set up a law clinic next May of 1999 in conjunction with Northwestern School of Law Professors. Funding support is now confirmed from AID and Soros Foundation, who have agreed to support Mr. Dzering's salary for two years and to assist the setting up of an international moot court competition scheduled for May of 1999. (December 1998)


PENNSYLVANIA

UKRANIAN BUSINESS PERSONS IN PITTSBURGH
The Pittsburgh Council of International Visitors, in cooperation with USIA's Community Connections Program, is hosting ten Ukrainian business persons in Pittsburgh for four-week business internships. (January 1999)


PUERTO RICO

"PUERTO RICO-HAITI UNIVERSOTY COOPERATION"
USIS Port-au-Prince reports the three-year university affiliation agreement between the State University of Haiti (UEH) and the University of Puerto Rico (UPR), begun in 1997, has had an amazingly productive year. Aimed at improving administration at UEH, the affiliations grant fortuitously coincided with the election of a new Rector after a gap of ten years and the return of autonomous leadership. Two professors have been successfully exchanged; three administrators from UPR held two seminars on university administration and development at UEH; and the number of Haitian undergraduates admitted to UPR has increased (thanks in part to the advising services of USIS). The UPR Team Leader in Haiti encouraged UEH to create a Commission for Reform and to select a team leader, which it did. He also organized a Round Table at the Caribbean Studies Association Meeting on "Promoting Academic Exchanges with Haiti." (June 1998)

"'COSTS OF CORRUPTION' VISIT TO DOMINICAN REPUBLIC" 
USIS Santo Domingo sponsored a visit by Hiram Morales Lugo, Director of the Puerto Rican Government's Office of Ethics, to speak on the costs of corruption for developing countries at a major business conference. Both in an interview with the newspaper "Hoy" and at the conference, Morales Lugo stressed the need for an Ethics Office to have independence. Among the audience were staffers from a Dominican congressional reform task froce that is being sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank.


RETURN TO THE TOP



RHODE ISLAND

"1993 USIS GRANT HELPS DEVELOP US-SLOVAK ACADEMIC EXCHANGE"
Late March saw a successful privately funded exchange program between the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and the Slovak Academy of Fine Arts and Design, the country's leading art school. Five years ago, USIS Bratislava funded an exhibition of works by a RISD professor who, in turn, founded what has become a rich exchange between the two schools. This year, the George Soros-funded Trust for Mutual Understanding funded travel by four Slovak professors to RISD and two Americans to the Slovak Academy. Ambassador Ralph Johnson attended last week's reception, held by the partners to spotlight their exchange and encourage corporate support. 


SOUTH CAROLINA

USIS FRANKFURT SEMINAR PROMOTES REGIONAL GERMAN TRADE WITH SOUTH CAROLINA
USIS Frankfurt, in collaboration with the Rheinland-Palatinate State Chancery, organized a full-day conference on July 1 on "Building an Environment for Job Creation and Business Development." The seminar at Frankfurt's Amerika Haus brought together leaders in small business development from South Carolina with their counterparts in the German states of Hesse, Rheinland-Palatinate, Baden-Württemberg, Sachsen-Anhalt, and Brandenburg. The president of the South Carolina Export Consortium explained the business development strategies used by a network of public and private organizations in his state to attract and create new businesses and jobs. Other business leaders from South Carolina offered advice about reducing bureaucratic obstacles to establishing small businesses and about facilitating easier access to venture capital. (July 1998)



SOUTH DAKOTA

"SOUTH DAKOTA REPRESENTATIVE VISITS EGYPT"
Kristie Fiegen, Representative in the State Legislature of South Dakota, was part of an American Council of Young Political Leaders (ACYPL) group that visited Cairo in June, 1993. (1993) 


TENNESSEE

EX-AMBASSADOR SPEAKS IN NASHVILLE
The Tennessean reported that Horace G. Dawson Jr., former U.S. ambassador to Botswana, recently spoke in Nashville at a Founder's Day and scholarship luncheon sponsored by the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and the Tau Lambda Chapter Education Foundation. Dawson is a noted educator who has held positions at several universities besides his service at the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Information Agency in Washington, D.C. He is presently director of the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center at Howard University in Washington. (January 1999)

USIS PARIS HELPS TENNESSEE MUSEUMS CREATE LINKS WITH NORMANDY
USIA's branch office in Paris assisted the State of Tennessee November 9-14 in an effort to build bridges between regional French and American museums. After several years of work and USIS assistance, the Tennessee State Museum has organized an exhibition of 60 Impressionist paintings, which opens in January in Nashville. USIS Paris organized a program and a reception for a high-level state delegation, led by the Governor's wife, Martha Sundquist, and representatives of Federal Express and other companies to meet French officials in Paris and Normandy. The result of the visit was the creation of a solid bond, built upon cultural exchanges, between Normandy and Tennessee and a stable working relationship between Paris and Tennessee museums. (November 1998)


TEXAS

CHINESE WOMEN LEADERS BEGIN PROGRAM INITIATED BY FIRST LADY
Fifteen Chinese women leaders began a USIA program in Washington, D.C., that initiated by First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton after her visit to Beijing last June. The group's packed three-week schedule included stops in New York, New Brunswick, Raleigh, Tulsa, Houston and San Francisco. (March 1999)

RICE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR TO SOUTH AFRICA FOR WORLD CONGRESS
Susan Keech McIntosh, professor of anthropology at Rice University in Houston, visited South Africa for the World Archeology Congress, to address the issue of illicit trade in looted antiquities. She traveled as a USIA American Culture Specialist. (January 1999)

MIDEAST LEARNING FROM HOUSTON
The Houston Chronicle recently reported that eight delegates spent two weeks in Houston as part of the Regional Computer Training Initiative for the Middle East. The computer training initiative is an exchange project sponsored by the United States Information Agency that directly supports the efforts of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees. The purpose is to upgrade the relevant job skills of Palestinian refugees, since 50 years of regional conflict has meant that a large majority of the current adult population has not had the opportunity to get advanced schooling. The UNRWA's vocational and semiprofessional training centers, three in the West Bank, two in Jordan and one each in Gaza, Syria and Lebanon, are the backbone of existing international efforts to assist the refugees. Working closely with USIA, the Institute of International Education placed the eight participants with organizations and companies in Houston for a two-week internship in computer-networked environments. Before their arrival in Houston, the group spent two days each in Washington, Boston, Denver, San Jose and San Francisco. (January 1999)

TEXAS STATE LEGISLATOR LECTURES IN CUBA
USIA's branch office in Havana helped arrange a meeting on political and economic conditions in Cuba and the effects of U.S. policy with independent Cuban journalists and human rights activists for a visiting Texas State Representative, in Cuba at the invitation of the Cuban government for a program that included a lecture at the University of Havana on state and local government in the U.S. (January 1999)

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON PROFESSOR PUTS AZERBAIJAN ONLINE
The Associated Press recently reported that University of Houston professor Curtis Johnson, in the College of Technology, has been in Baku helping set up an Internet Access and Training Program (IATP) funded by the United States Information Agency (USIA), one of several projects the agency was trying to set up in some of the newly independent states. Baku is a city of a million-plus by the Caspian Sea. But it's typical of a land and people who have been cut off by geography and politics from the kind of global communication and access that many Americans now take for granted. Thanks to Johnson and others like him, that is slowly beginning to change. "The idea is that the Internet is a way to open up the world to these people," he said. "And I feel like I'm doing just that. It's both thrilling and a challenge." (January 1999)


UTAH

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNITVERSITY PROFESSORS NAMED FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS
The Deseret News reported that three Brigham Young University professors were named American Fulbright scholars for 1998-99. William E. Evenson, professor in the department of physics and astronomy, is at the University of Constance in Constance, Germany. Gary F. McKinnon, professor in the department of business management in the Marriott School of Management, is at the Academy of Economic Studies in Chisinau, Moldova. Linda Marie Price, a visiting assistant professor in the department of business management in the Marriott School of Management during winter 1998, is teaching at Belarusian State Economics University in Minsk, Belarus. The Fulbright program is sponsored and funded by the United States Information Agency. For more than 50 years, the program has been recognized as the flagship program in international educational exchange. All Fulbright applications undergo rigorous peer review administered by the council for international exchange of scholars. (January 1999)


VERMONT


VIRGINIA

GEORGE MASON U. PROFESSORS TEACH CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN RWANDA
Two staff members of the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution of George Mason University traveled to Rwanda, under USIA auspices, selecting participants and conducting an orientation workshop on management and leadership development. (January 1999)



WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR WINS FULBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIP
The Lewiston Morning Tribune recently reported that Emmett P. Fiske, an organizational development specialist in the department of rural sociology at Washington State University, waas awarded a Fulbright Senior Scholar grant to Chile during the calendar year 1999. The award was announced recently by the U.S. Information Agency and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Fiske, a member of the WSU faculty since 1979, will be affiliated with three Chilean universities during his exchange year. He will offer Spanish language courses on environmental conflict resolution to both graduate and undergraduate students. (January 1999)


WEST VIRGINIA

EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN MOZAMBIQUE
USIA funded a speaker program in Mozambique, featuring Professor Robert Maxwell of West Virginia University, that assisted the growth of diversified higher education opportunities in the populous northern and central regions of the country. In combination with the assignment of the first Fulbrighter to the Catholic University of Mozambique and a USIA International Visitor Program grant for the rector of that university, the visit of Professor Maxwell produced tangible evidence of the effectiveness of post's efforts. Within two months of his visit to Mozambique, thirty-five students became the first to enroll in Catholic University's new Cuamba campus to begin study for a Bachelor's degree in agriculture, following a curriculum designed by Professor Maxwell. In addition, a University of Pretoria agriculture professor, introduced to the rector of the university by Professor Maxwell, is expected to visit Cuamba next month to flesh out future collaboration. (June 1999)

USIA TRAVEL GRANT TO NIGER JOURNALIST BRINGS POSITIVE RESULTS
USIA supported the 1998 travel of a journalist from Niger to take part in a five-week training program sponsored by Freedom Forum's International Journalism Exchange. The journalist, who works for an independent radio, traveled to Charlestown, West Virginia where he worked in the newsroom of the Charlestown "Daily Mail." On returning to Niamey, he wrote an article in his organization's news letter that showed the investment was well worth it. Of his experience, he wrote that the interaction with American reporters helped him to sharpen his views on the social purpose and highest ideals of journalism. "I now understand why American journalists are so involved with their community and concerned with the promotion of issues of public interest and the reporting of positive solution-oriented stories." (March 1999)


WISCONSIN

USIS SOUTH AFRICA SUPPORTS SCIENCE JOURNALISM
Utilizing Gore-Mbeki Binational Commission Exchange Support funding, Professor Sharon Dunwoody, University of Wisconsin-Madison, completed a two-week program on March 12 as keynote speaker at South Africa's first annual Science Journalism Awards Dinner. Her program of workshops, conducted in partnership with Nan Broadbent of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, reached a broad audience of news and free-lance journalists, journalism faculty and students, and scientists at 6 locations country-wide. The Johannesburg program included four journalists with "newspapers for the homeless." Covering both methodology and access to information via the internet, the program convinced participants that good science journalism requires an inquiring mind and a nose for facts, not a scientific degree. The journalists left determined to lobby their editors for more space for science-oriented articles, while the scientists were energized to use the information as a means to give increased exposure to South African scientific achievement. (March 1999)

TIBETAN EXCHANGE VISITORS GREET SMALL TOWN RESIDENTS
"From January 23 to January 25, a group of about 16 Tibetan Monks visited the city of Stevens Point, Wisconsin. This was the third stop on thier World Peace Tour. There was a talk given at the Univesity of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, and several workshops were held at a local buisness. I personally thought it was fascinating, and it gave me a much greater appreciation of the Tibetan culture of which previously I knew almost nothing about. The monks stayed with several families in the area. Their main focus was not to focus on polotics, on the conflict with China, but on their religion. The workshops were introductions to Dharma meditations, a chanting class, and two blessing ceremonies." (January 1999, from a Stevens Point resident)


WYOMING

"U.S. SPEAKER HAS MAJOR IMPACT ON AMERICAN STUDIES IN BELARUS"
Eric Sandeen, American Studies Program Director, University of Wyoming, in only two days (March 30-31) had a major impact at four Minsk universities, all with American Studies programs in early stages of development. Belarus educators learned to design interdisciplinary American studies curricula and observed a substantive introduction to the use of the Internet for teaching American studies. In addition, USIS Minsk invited 30 lecturers from regional universities for a seminar on "Curricula Design on American Studies" and "Teaching American Studies through the Internet." This was the highlight of Sandeen's program, as the seminar reinforced the network of alumni of USIS civic education, leadership, American Studies, Fulbright and IV programs. As a result of his work, "Envilla" University is designing an interdisciplinary American Studies course, the Linguistic University is using the Internet for teaching American Studies, Belarusian State is committed to further consultations with Sandeen on starting an American Studies program, and the American Studies Association of Belarus has a wealth of contacts and ideas for future program development. (March 1998)

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