OUTLINE OF CONTENTS
I. Immunity from Judicial Seizure Law
II. Checklist and Sample
     A. Check List for Applicants
     B. Sample Introductory Paragraphs

I.  Public Law 89-259

Exemption from Judicial Seizure of Cultural Objects
Imported for Temporary Exhibition


Public Law 89-259 (S.2273), 79 Stat. 985, approved
10/19/65 & #185;

AN ACT to render immune from seizure under judicial process
certain objects of cultural significance imported into the United
States for temporary display or exhibition, and for other
purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
United States of America in Congress assembled, That (a) whenever
any work of art or other object of cultural significance is
imported into the United States from any foreign country,
pursuant to an agreement entered into between the foreign owner
of custodian thereof and the United States or one or more
cultural or educational institutions within the United States
providing for the temporary exhibition or display thereof within
the United States at any cultural exhibition, assembly, activity,
or festival administered, operated, or sponsored, without profit,
by any such cultural or educational institution, no court of the
United States, any State, the District of Columbia, or any
territory or possession of the United States may issue or enforce
any judicial process, or enter any judgment, decree, or order,
for the purpose or having the effect of depriving such
institution, or any carrier engaged in transporting such work or
object within the United States of custody or control of such
object if before the importation of such object the President or
his designee has determined that such object is of cultural
significance and that the temporary exhibition or display thereof
within the United States is in the national interest, and a
notice to that effect has been published in the Federal
Register.

 (b)  If in any judicial proceeding in any such court any such
process, judgment, decree, or order is sought, issued or entered,
the United States attorney for the judicial district within which
such proceeding is pending shall be entitled as of right to
intervene as a party to that proceeding, and upon request made by
either the institution adversely affected, or upon direction by
the Attorney General if the United States is adversely affected,
shall apply to such court for the denial, quashing, or vacating
thereof.

 (c)  Nothing contained in this Act shall preclude (1) any
judicial action for or in aid of the enforcement of the terms of
any such agreement or the enforcement of the obligation of any
carrier under any contract for the transportation of any such
object of cultural significance; or (2) the institution or
prosecution by or on behalf of any such institution or the United
States of any action for or in aid of the fulfillment of any
obligation assumed by such institution or the United States
pursuant to any such agreement.
____________________


II.  Check List and Sample

     A.  Check List for Applicants

In support of your application, submit the following to the
General Counsel, United States Information Agency, 301-4th
Street, S.W., Room 700, Washington, D.C. 20547:

1.   A schedule of all the imported items to be covered
     (including description and value);

2.   a copy of the "agreement entered into between the foreign
     owner or custodian thereof and the United States or one or
     more cultural or educational institutions within the United
     States providing for the temporary exhibition," a copy of
     the agreements with participating museums or other U.S.
     cultural or educational institutions, and a copy of the
     agreements between the foreign owner and the foreign
     custodian;

3.   copies of all related commercial agreements between any or
     all of the U.S. institutions and the lender or other
     parties;

4.   a list of places and dates of exhibition, especially the
     date the objects are expected to arrive in the United
     States(be certain to notify USIA of any changes in
     importation date);

5.   a statement whether or not the exhibitions are to be
     administered, operated or sponsored without profit to the
     borrowing and lending institutions (even though admission
     and similar fees which merely cover costs are permissible, a
     description of all charges or preferences in admission
     should be provided);  
     
6.   an appraisal of the national interest issue, information why
     anyone might want to attach the property in the United
     States, and an evaluation of any such threat;

7.   a scholarly statement establishing the cultural significance
     of the objects, and

8.   facts supporting a claim that U.S. participants are cultural
     or educational institutions, especially a citation to the 
     organization's current IRC 501(c)(3) determination
     letter.

Attached for your convenience are a few sample introductory
paragraphs you may wish to use in your submission letter to the
General Counsel.

     B.  Sample Introductory Paragraphs

     This letter is in regard to the immunity from judicial
seizure granted by United States courts pursuant to 22 U.S.C.
2459.  I write in connection with works of art coming to the
United States from abroad, for the exhibition
entitled________________________________________________

     I hereby request that USIA make the determinations that the
works of art are of cultural significance and that their
temporary exhibition in the United States is in the national
interest and request, further, that there be publication to that
effect in the Federal Register prior to importation, which is
expected to take place on or about_________________________

     I understand that in any judicial proceedings involving
these works of art, if the United States court finds that the
above determinations have been made, timely publication has
occurred, and that the other provisions of 22 U.S.C. 2459 have
been met, the court will grant immunity from judicial seizure to
the works of art.