June 7, 1995

THE HONORABLE JOHN D. HOLUM, DIRECTOR
U.S. ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY
REMARKS TO THE NATIONAL STRATEGY FORUM
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

I'm pleased to address the National Strategy Forum here in "The City That Works." For arms control and nonproliferation are part of a national strategy that works -- every day, quietly and cost-effectively -- to strengthen our national security and make Americans safer.

The Increased Need for Arms Control

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, many expected the need for arms control to disappear too. In fact, the opposite has happened. But perceptions lag behind reality: many registered the expectation without following the facts on the ground.

While the bipolar nuclear standoff is largely over, it has left behind tens of thousands of nuclear weapons that could once again be aimed our way. So we are just starting to extract those sharp teeth -- by formally removing thousands of missiles and warheads under the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, which went into force last December -- and working to ratify START II.

Meanwhile, the Soviet-American arms race has been replaced by a danger perhaps even more ominous: proliferation of weapons of mass destruction -- whether nuclear, chemical or biological, or the missiles to deliver them -- to rogue regimes and terrorists around the world.