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U.S. Department of State
1995:  International Adoption -- Korea
Bureau of Consular Affairs


     
     
                       INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION - KOREA
     
                                                                     
     DISCLAIMER:  THE INFORMATION IN THIS CIRCULAR RELATING TO THE
     LEGAL REQUIREMENTS OF SPECIFIC FOREIGN COUNTRIES IS PROVIDED
     FOR GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY.  QUESTIONS INVOLVING
     INTERPRETATION OF SPECIFIC FOREIGN LAWS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
     FOREIGN COUNSEL.
                                                                     
     
     PLEASE NOTE:  THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA'S SPECIAL ADOPTION LAW NO.
     2977 SECTION 9 (A) REQUIRES THE USE OF AN ADOPTION AGENCY FOR
     OVERSEAS ADOPTION OF KOREAN ORPHANS, AND THAT SECTION 10 (A)
     PROVIDES THAT SUCH AGENCIES MUST BE AUTHORIZED BY THE MINISTRY
     OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS.
     
     Korean Government Policy on Foreign Adoptions
     
     The Korean Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (MHSA) is now
     in the process of phasing out overseas adoptions of Korean
     children.  The number of children adopted abroad has decreased
     about thirty percent over each of the last several years, and
     this decline can be expected to continue.  By 1996 foreign
     adoption of Korean children will only continue for a small
     number of mixed race children and children with serious medical
     problems.  All children placed with overseas agencies are first
     referred to the Seoul City Children's Guidance Clinic which
     makes the child available to Korean families.  This step
     assures that no child will be sent overseas for adoption when
     the child could be adopted by a Korean family.
     
     Decline in Korean Children Available for Adoption
     
     Although Korea has traditionally been the largest single source
     of foreign children for adoption in the United States, there
     has been a sharp decline in the number of Korean children
     available for foreign adoption.  Although the number of visas
     granted to Korean orphans for adoption in the United States in
     1992 was slightly higher than 1991, this does not signify a
     change in the policy of the Korean government.
     
     FISCAL       IR-3 IMMIGRANT VISAS          IR-4 IMMIGRANT VISAS
     YEAR      ISSUED TO KOREAN ORPHANS      ISSUED TO KOREAN ORPHANS
                  ADOPTED ABROAD                ADOPTED IN THE U.S.
     
     FY-1987                 157                           5,834
     FY-1988                  76                           5,001
     FY-1989                  58                           3,486
     FY-1990                  47                           2,573
     FY-1991                  33                           1,785
     FY-1992                  31                           1,809
     FY-1993                  26                           1,749
     FY-1994                  17                           1,778

     Tighter Restrictions on Adoption of Children Over Age Seven
     
     The U.S. Embassy reports that there are restrictions on the
     overseas adoption of children over the age of seven.  Those
     children already in the pipeline who have been identified by
     American families will be permitted to leave, but future
     placement of children over seven years old with American
     families will be very rare.
     
     The Process of Adopting a Korean Child:  Korean authorities
     advise that the entire adoption process in Korea is
     child-oriented rather than parent-oriented.  This reflects the
     fact that there are many more interested prospective parents
     than there are children available for adoption.  Consequently,
     Korean authorities have incorporated various protective
     measures in their system to ensure the welfare of the child. 
     Most Korean children adopted by U.S. citizens leave Korea in
     the foster care of a U.S. adoption agency affiliated with one
     of the four Korean-Government licensed adoption agencies.  The
     child is then adopted by the adoptive parents in the United
     States.  Note that it is not necessary for the prospective
     adoptive parent(s) to travel to Korea.  The adoption agency
     will process the case in Korea and arrange for escort and
     transportation of the child to the U.S.
     
     After the child arrives in the U.S., the American adoption
     agency follows up with the parents and child through a series
     of home visits at six-month intervals.  The American agency
     sends reports of the post-placement home visits to the Korean
     adoption agency which keeps the reports in the child's
     permanent file.  The child is not officially adopted by the
     American family until the child has been in the U.S. for one
     year.  The American adoption agency maintains a constant
     relationship with the child and family even after the final
     adoption, up until the child is a naturalized American citizen,
     usually two years after the child's entry into the United
     States.  The Korean adoption agencies' files on adopted Korean
     children are maintained indefinitely.  Also, the children and
     their adoptive families are encouraged to attend American
     agency-sponsored get-togethers to maintain contact with other
     Korean adoptees in their community.
     
     Time Frame:  The period of time between when a couple first
     applies for a child and when the child arrives in the United
     States is between one and four years.  One year is the norm for
     hard-to-place handicapped children and three years is usual for
     healthy infants.
     
     Beginning the Process:  The first step for an American family
     is to apply to an American adoption agency affiliated with one
     of the four Korean-Government licensed adoption agencies.  The
     American agency conducts a home study of the prospective 
     adoptive parents which can take from six months to one year. 
     The home study examines the work, marital, financial, social,
     and medical history of the U.S. family.  Family size, age, and
     income of the prospective parents are carefully considered. 
     The prospective adoptive parent(s) should contact the U.S.
     Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) nearest them to
     initiate the pre-processing of a yet-to-be-identified child or
     a specific child for an immigrant visa.  It is important to
     contact INS very early in the process to ensure that the child
     you are trying to adopt will meet the requirements of U.S.
     immigration law to qualify for an immigrant visa.  
     
     Selecting an Adoption Agency:  Americans who are interested in
     adopting a child in Korea must enlist the services of an
     adoption agency.  The agencies listed below are officially
     authorized by the Korean government.  The Department of State
     does not assume responsibility for the professional caliber or
     practice of these agencies.  
     
              Eastern Child Welfare Society, Inc. (Korean Christian
              Crusade) Address:  #493 Changchun-Dong, Sudanemun-ku,
              Seoul.  011-82-2-322-3941/5.  FAX:  011-82-2-333-1588
     
              Holt Children Services.  Address:  #382-14,
              Hapzong-Dong, Mapu-ku, Seoul.  Tel: 
              011-82-2-324-6509 or 011-82-2-332-7501/5.  FAX: 
              011-82-2-335-6319
     
              Korea Social Service.  Address:  #533-3,
              Ssangmun-Dong, Dobong-ku, Seoul.  Tel: 
              011-82-2-993-2381 or 011-82-2-908-9191.  FAX: 
              011-82-2-908-3344
     
              Social Welfare Society, Inc.  Address:  #718-35,
              Yuksam-Dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul, or CPO Box 24, Seoul,
              Korea.  Tel:  011-82-2-552-1015/8 or
              011-82-2-567-8891/3.  FAX:  011-82-2-552-1019
     
     A LIST OF U.S. ADOPTION AGENCIES AFFILIATED WITH EACH OF THESE
     AUTHORIZED AGENCIES IS ATTACHED AS AN APPENDIX TO THIS FLYER. 
     NOTE THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE DOES NOT ASSUME
     RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE PROFESSIONAL CALIBRE OF THESE AGENCIES,
     BUT PROVIDES THIS LIST FOR INFORMATION.
     
     
     Korean Regulations Governing Foreign Adoption:  Korean
     authorities have advised the American Embassy in Seoul of the
     following criteria for selecting adoptive parents as
     established by the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs on
     February 6, 1988.  These are administrative policy guidelines
     and not legal requirements, but local adoption agencies can be
     expected to follow them.
     
              - The adoptive parents must be eligible for adoption
              under the laws of their country or state of residence.
     
              - The couple should be married for at least three
              years and be between the ages of 25 and 44.  Korean
              authorities usually require that both adoptive
              parents in overseas adoptions be under 45 years old;
              however, they may make exceptions in some cases.  The
              following factors may be considered when making
              exceptions to the age limit: (1) at least one parent
              is under 45, (2) the adoptive parents have previously
              adopted a Korean orphan, and (3) the parents are
              willing to adopt an orphan with serious medical
              problems.  These aforementioned factors are not
              official and may be applied differently depending on
              the circumstances of a particular case.
     
              - The adoptive couple should have no more than five
              children.  This number includes the child or children
              to be adopted.
     
              - The couple should not have an age difference of more
              than 15 years.
     
              - The income of the adoptive couple should be higher
              than the national average of their country and
              sufficient to raise the child.
     
     Status of Abandoned Children:  A separate Korean regulation
     governs the adoption of abandoned children.  This rule states
     that an abandoned child can only be adopted six months after
     the child has been registered with the Korean Children's Fund
     (KCF), which maintains a central listing of all abandoned and
     missing children in order to help parents who are trying to
     locate them.  Adoption of children over 18 months of age must
     be delayed for 12 months after registration with KCF.  Attempts
     to obtain waivers of this waiting period have been unsuccessful
     to date and adoptive parents impacted by this procedural change
     have no recourse but to wait the additional time.  This
     procedure does not apply to children who have been given up for
     adoption by a single parent or both parents.
     
     Health Considerations:  Korean adoption agencies advise that
     they make every effort to ensure that children are fit to
     travel when they leave Korea.  However, adoptive parents should
     be aware that the stress of trans-Pacific travel, often
     requiring one or more connecting flights, means that children
     will sometimes be sick on arrival in the U.S.  
     
     As the number of children released for overseas adoption from
     Korea has declined the proportion of children with serious
     medical problems has increased.  In these cases, the agencies
     reportedly provide prospective parents with a full medical
     report and a picture of the child.  The agencies reportedly 
     will not release a child without an acknowledgment of the
     health problem.  The U.S. Embassy will issue an immigrant visa
     to a child with health problems only if the agency submits this
     written acceptance with the immigrant visa application.  The
     agencies try to place children with medical problems with
     families who have specifically indicated their willingness to
     accept a child with such problems.
     
     Placement Costs:  The U.S. Embassy in Seoul has been advised
     that local Korean adoption agencies currently receive
     approximately U.S. $4,000 per child in fees or donations from
     the U.S. agencies.  These fees pay for temporary or long-term
     foster care, food, clothing, medical care, legal fees for the
     Korean adoption, and passport and visa processing for the
     children.  The balance is used for agency operating costs and
     in-country programs, such as those for the handicapped.  While
     a decrease in overseas adoptions might affect income currently
     used to meet agency operating costs, we are informed that the
     agencies expect to receive increased government funding, and
     that their handicapped programs now are attracting Korean
     sponsors.  We do not have information about fees charged by
     U.S. adoption agencies affiliated with one of the four
     Korean-Government licensed adoption agencies.
     
     U.S. Immigration Requirements
     
         -  Immigration and Naturalization Service publication,
     M-249Y, (Revised 1990), entitled "The Immigration of Adopted
     and Prospective Adoptive Children".  This booklet contains
     information on INS requirements for prospective adopted
     children and adoptive parents.  This pamphlet includes a
     checklist on orphan petition procedures; a copy of this
     checklist is annexed to this information flyer for the
     convenience of prospective adoptive parents to help in tracking
     the immigration requirements.  A single copy of the actual
     pamphlet is available by contacting the nearest INS office or
     writing to:  Director, Outreach Program, Room 2108, Immigration
     and Naturalization Service, 425 I Street, N.W., Washington,
     D.C.  20536.
     
     Get Started Early With U.S. Immigration Procedure:
     
     Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that certain very
     time-consuming processes will have to be completed before the
     required U.S. Immigration petition (either the preliminary
     I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition
     or the final I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate
     Relative) can be approved.  These include, but are not limited
     to satisfactory completion and submission to INS of a home
     study of the adopting parent(s), compliance with any state
     pre-adoption conditions and a fingerprint check by the FBI of
     those parent(s).  After the I-600A application is processed 
     favorably, INS will issue a Form I-171H, Notice of Favorable
     Determination Concerning Application for Advanced Processing of
     Orphan Petition.  If no I-600A is filed, when the I-600
     petition is approved by INS, INS will issue Form I-171, Notice
     of Approval of Relative Immigrant Visa Petition.  It is
     therefore suggested that prospective adopting parents get in
     touch with the INS office having jurisdiction over their place
     of residence in the U.S. at the earliest opportunity prior to
     initiating an adoption application.
     
     Understanding the Process:
     
     Unconditional Abandonment and Meeting the Definition of Orphan:
     
     U.S. law provides for the immigration of orphans adopted
     overseas by Americans under section 101(B)(1)(F) of the
     Immigration and Nationality Act(INA).
     
     Definition of Orphan Under U.S. INA:  Under U.S. immigration
     law, the definition of orphan is broader than the common
     definition.  A foreign child may be considered an orphan for
     the purposes of U.S. immigration law if his/her parents have
     died or disappeared; if they have unconditionally abandoned or
     deserted him/her; or if he/she is separated or lost from them. 
     Normally, abandonment involves permanent placement of the child
     in an orphanage.  The law states that an eligible child must be
     under the age of sixteen at the time the immigrant visa
     petition is filed.  A child with two living parents can meet
     the definition of an orphan only through the disappearance of,
     abandonment or desertion by or separation or loss from both
     parents.  
     
     Unconditional Abandonment:   As noted above, abandonment of a
     child must be unconditional.  Agreeing to give a child up for
     adoption by a specific person does not constitute unconditional
     abandonment, since the parents are giving up custody with the
     understanding that the child will be cared for and will be
     adopted by a particular individual, and thus continue to
     maintain some degree of parental control over the child.
     
     The Board of Immigration Appeals of the U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service (INS) has ruled that a child with one
     surviving parent who has not been abandoned may qualify for
     orphan status only if the sole surviving parent is destitute
     by local standards or is otherwise physically or mentally
     unable to care for the child.  This means that the child may
     not be classified as an orphan unless the sole or surviving
     parent cannot provide the child the nourishment and shelter
     necessary for subsistence consistent with the local standards
     of the child's place of residence.  The parent must also
     irrevocably release the child for emigration and adoption and
     must not continue to maintain contact with the child.  In cases
     of this kind, INS usually requires consular officers to
     investigate the parent's inability to care for the child.
     

     U.S. FEES:
     
     INS Fees for I-600 and I-600A Petitions:  There is an INS fee
     of $155.00 for an I-600 or I-600A petition.  If you have a
     valid I-600A and file an I-600 within one year of the approval
     of the I-600A, no fee will be charged for the I-600 provided
     you are only petitioning for one child or for siblings.  If you
     have a valid I-600A and within one year of approval of the
     I-600A are petitioning for more than one child and the children
     are not siblings, the I-600 fee will be charged for each child
     after the first child except for the first child.
     
     U.S. State Department Authentication Fee:  If you are having
     documents authenticated by the Department of State
     Authentication Office, there is a fee of $4.00 per document. 
     For further information regarding the authentication process
     please call (202) 647-5002.
     
     U.S. Immigrant Visa Fee:  The fee for the immigrant visa is
     $200.00 and may be paid either in U.S. dollars or Korean Won. 
     This $200.00 may be covered by the fee charged by the adoption
     agency; consult your agency regarding this.  The American
     Embassy Seoul does not accept personal checks or credit cards.
     
     ADDRESSES OF U.S EMBASSY AND CONSULATE IN KOREA
     
     Should you choose to travel to Korea during the processing of
     your adoption case, it is suggested that you register with
     either the U.S. Embassy in Seoul or the Consulate in Pusan. 
     The Embassy or Consulate will be able to provide information
     regarding the current situation in Korea, recent changes in
     adoption procedures in Korea, and other information such as
     lists of physicians, attorneys, interpreters and translators.
     
     The addresses and phone numbers for the U.S. Embassy in Seoul
     and the U.S. Consulate in Pusan are as follows:
     
              Local Korean Address          Mailing Address from U.S.
     
              U.S. Embassy                  Amembassy
              82 Sejong-Ro, Chongro-ku      Unit 15550
              Seoul, Korea                  APO AP  96205-0001
     
         Telephone - Seoul, 011-82-2-397-4114, Fax 011-82-2-738-8845
     
              U.S. Consulate                U. S. Consulate
              24 2-Ka,                      Unit 15485
              Daechung Dong, Chung-ku       APO AP  96259-0002
              Pusan, Korea
     
         Telephone - Pusan, 011-82-51-246-7791,
                        Fax 011-82-51-246-8859
     

     ADDRESSES OF KOREAN EMBASSY AND CONSULATES IN THE U.S.
     
     Embassy of Korea
     Consular Section 
     2450 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
     Washington, D.C.  20008              tel:  (202) 939-5600
     
     Korea also has consulates in Mobile, Alabama; Anchorage,
     Alaska; Phoenix, Arizona, Los Angeles, California; San
     Francisco, California; Denver, Colorado; Ft. Lauderdale,
     Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Agana, Guam; Honolulu, Hawaii;
     Chicago, Illinois; Evanston, Illinois; Kansas City, Kansas; New
     Orleans, Louisiana; Boston, Massachusetts; Detroit, Michigan;
     Minneapolis, Minnesota; St. Louis, Missouri; New York, New
     York; Cleveland, Ohio; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Portland,
     Oregon; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; San Juan, Puerto Rico;
     Houston, Texas and Seattle, Washington.
     
     QUESTIONS:  Specific questions regarding adoptions in Korea may
     be addressed to the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy or
     Consulate.  You may also contact the Office of Children's
     Issues, U.S. Department of State, Room 4800 N.S., 2201 C
     Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.  20520-4818, telephone (202)
     647-2688 with specific adoption questions.  Recorded
     information concerning significant changes in adoption
     procedures is available 24 hours a day at: (202) 736-7000, or
     by automated fax (calling from the telephone on your fax
     machine) at (202) 647-3000.  If the country you are interested
     in is not listed, procedures have not significantly changed. 
     Information on immigrant visas is available from the State
     Department's Visa Office, at (202) 663-1225.  This 24 hour
     automated system includes options to speak with consular
     officers during business hours for questions not answered in
     the recorded material.  Application forms and petitions for
     immigrant visas are available from the U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service, the nearest office of which is listed
     in the federal pages of your telephone book, under  U.S.
     Department of Justice.
     
     In addition, the State Department publishes Consular
     Information Sheets and Travel Warnings.  Consular Information
     Sheets are available for every country in the world, providing
     information such as the location of the U.S. Embassy, health
     conditions, political situations, and crime reports.  When
     situations are sufficiently serious that the State Department
     recommends U.S. citizens avoid traveling to a country, a Travel
     Warning is issued.  Both Consular Information Sheets and Travel
     Warnings may be heard 24 hours a day by calling the State
     Department's Office of Overseas Citizens Services at (202)
     647-5225 from a touch-tone telephone.  The recording is 
     updated as new information becomes available.  In addition,
     this information is accessible through the automated fax
     machine, as above, and is also available at any of the 13
     regional passport agencies, field offices of the U.S.
     Department of Commerce, and U.S. Embassies and Consulates
     abroad.  Furthermore, you may write in requesting information,
     sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Overseas Citizens
     Services, Room 4811 N.S., 2201 C St., N.W., U.S. Department of
     State, Washington, D.C.  20520-4818.  Finally, information is
     available through your personal computer.  If you have a
     computer and a modem, you can access the Consular Affairs
     Bulletin Board (CABB).  This service is free of charge, and may
     be reached at: (202) 647-9225.  Consular Information Sheets and
     Travel Warnings may also be accessed by subscribers to many
     on-line services.  For complete information on accessing
     consular information via computer, please request document
     1016, entitled "Consular Information Program," from the
     automated fax system, which is described in the preceding
     paragraph.
     
     Applying for U.S. Citizenship for an Adopted Child:
     
     Questions about naturalization of an adopted child as a U.S.
     citizen after the child has entered the United States should be
     addressed to the INS office with jurisdiction over the adoptive
     parent(s)' place of residence.  The process requires that INS
     Form N-643 Application for Certificate of Citizenship on behalf
     of an Adopted Child, be filed with the INS before the child is
     18 years of age.
     
     CONCLUSION:  The American Embassy and the Department of State
     stand ready to assist adoptive parents, within the limits of
     our authority.  Any feedback adoptive parents are willing and
     able to provide about their experiences while trying to adopt
     children from Korea would be very helpful to us in ensuring the
     validity and usefulness of the information in this and similar
     brochures.  
     
     Attachments:
     
         Appendix - List of Affiliated Agencies
         Check List for Orphan Petition Procedures
     


     
                                 APPENDIX 1
                               U.S. AGENCIES
                     AFFILIATED WITH KOREAN GOVERNMENT
                        AUTHORIZED ADOPTION AGENCIES
     
     
                 EASTERN CHILD WELFARE SOCIETY, INC.(ECWS)
     
     
     ARIZONA
     
     
     Dillon Southwest
     Mrs. Emilie Sundie, Administrator
     3014 N. Hayden Road, Suite 101
     Scottsdale, AZ  8521
     
     
     CALIFORNIA
     
     
     Adoption Services International
     Ms. Sandra Browne, Executive Director
     4737 Ortega Drive
     Ventura, CA  93003
     
     COLORADO
     
     
     Friends of Children of Various Nations, Inc.
     Mrs. Cheryl Markson, Executive Director
     1818 Gaylord Street, Second Floor
     Denver, CO  80206
     
     HAWAII
     
     
     Catholic Services to Families
     Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Honolulu
     Ms. Juanita Iwamoto, MSW, Executive Director
     250 South Vineyard Street
     Honolulu, HI  98813
     Telephone:  (808)533-0293
     
     ILLINOIS
     
     
     Child and Family Services
     Bensenville Home Society
     Ms. Pat Radley, A.C.S.W, Director of Adoptions
     331 S. York Road
     Bensenville, IL  60106
     
     
     MINNESOTA
     
     
     Children's Home Society of MN, Inc.
     Mr. David Pilgrim, Program Director Adoption Programs &
     Permanency Planning or
     Ms. Jean Ramsay, Senior Coordinator, International Waiting
     Children
     2230 Como Avenue
     St. Paul, MN  55108
     Telephone: (612)646-6393
     
     MONTANA
     
     
     Montana Intercountry Adoption, Inc.
     Dr. Harriet Tamminga, Director
     108 S. 8th
     Bozeman, MT  59715
     
     NEW YORK
     
     
     Parsons Child and Family Center
     Mrs. Mary L. Baum, Director, Foster Care & Adoption Program
     60 Academy Road
     Albany, NY  12208
     
     New Beginnings Family and Children's Services
     Mr. Chong H. Park, C.S.W., Executive Director
     141 Willis Avenue
     Mineola, NY  11501
     Telephone: (516)747-2204
     
     OKLAHOMA
     
     
     Dillon International, Inc.
     Mrs. Karin H. Price, Director of Adoption
     7615 East 63rd Place South, Suite 100
     Tulsa, OK  74133
     
     
     PENNSYLVANIA
     
     
     Catholic Social Services, Inc.
     Ms. Helen Prim, Administrator of Pregnancy Services and
     Adoption Assistance
     222 N. 17th Street
     Philadelphia, PA  19103
     

     LOVE The Children
     Ms. Mary L. Graves, Executive Director
     221 W. Broad Street
     Quakertown, PA  18951
     
     WASHINGTON
     
     
     Catholic Community Services
     Mr. William Harris, Program Manager for Adoptions
     100 23rd Avenue South
     Seattle, WA  98144-2302
     (206)323-6336
     
     WISCONSIN
     
     
     Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan
     South Central Office
     Ms. Margaret Groves, International Adoption Coordinator
     101 Nob Hill Road, Suite 200
     Madison, WI  53713
     
     WASHINGTON, DC
     
     Adoption Service Information Agency
     Mrs. Mary Durr, Executive Director
     7720 Alaska Avenue, N.W.
     Washington, DC  20012
     Telephone: (301)726-7193
     
     
     
                       HOLT CHILDREN'S SERVICES, INC
     
     
     MARYLAND
     
     
     Associate Catholic Charities
     Ms. Ellen Eckhart, Director Family Services
     19 West Franklin Street
     Baltimore, MD  21201
     Telephone: (410)659-4050
     
     

     MASSACHUSETTS
     
     
     Wide Horizons for Children
     Mrs. Vicki Peterson, Executive Director
     282 Moody Street
     Waltham, MA  02154
     Telephone: (617)894-5330
     
     
     MICHIGAN
     
     
     Bethany Christian Service
     Mr. Glenn Demots, Executive Director
     901 Eastern, N.E.
     Grand Rapids, MI  49503
     Telephone: (616)459-6273
     
     
     OREGON
     
     
     Holt International Children's Services
     Mr. John Williams, Executive Director
     1195 City View Street (P.O. Box 2880)
     Eugene, OR  97402
     Telephone: (503)687-2202
     
     
     PENNSYLVANIA
     
     
     Welcome House Social Services
     The Pearl S. Buck Foundation
     Ms. Marie J. Mercer, Executive Director
     P.O. Box 181, Green Hills Farm
     Perkasie, PA  18944
     Telephone: (215)249-1516
     
     
     WASHINGTON
     
     
     World Association for Children and Parents
     Mrs. Janice S. Neilson, Executive Director
     543 Industry Drive
     Tukwila, WA  98188
     Telephone: (206)575-4550
     

     
                           KOREA SOCIAL SERVICES
     
     
     Family Adoption Consultants, Inc.
     Ms. Lorene Cook, Director
     421 W. Crosstown Parkway
     P.O. Box 489
     Kalamazoo, MI  49005
     Telephone:  (616)343-3316  FAX:  (616)343-3359
     
     
                        SOCIAL WELFARE SOCIETY, INC.
     
     
     CONNECTICUT
     
     
     Family & Children's Aid of Mid-Fairfield County, INC.
     9 Mott Avenue, 4th Floor
     Norwalk, CT  06850
     Telephone:  (203) 855-8765
     
     MICHIGAN
     
     
     Americans for International Aid and Adoption
     877 S. Adams, Suite 106
     Birmingham, MI  48009
     Telephone:  (313) 645-2211
     
     MINNESOTA
     
     
     Children's Home Society of Minnesota
     2230 Como Avenue
     St. Paul, MN  55108
     Telephone:  (612)439-2418
     
     NEW YORK
     
     
     Spence Chapin Services to Family & Children
     6 East 94th Street
     New York, NY  10128-0698
     (212)369-0300
     
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