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U.S. Department of State
1995:  International Adoption -- China
Bureau of Consular Affairs

     
     
     
     
     
                       China Adoptions Microlog Text
                               (202-736-7000)
     
     
     
     
     The U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou has been informed that the
     China Adoption Center, which processed a limited number of
     applications in August, once again is accepting applications
     for foreign adoptions by U.S. citizens.
     
     In recent weeks there have been a number of media reports
     concerning orphans in China.  To date, those reports do not
     appear to have affected the processing of adoptions in China. 
     While the process from beginning until completion may last
     several months, in general, adoptions in China are progressing
     smoothly.  Through August of 1995 there have been 1,528
     adoptions in China compared to a total of 1,094 adoptions in
     all of 1994..  
     
     Couples who are adopting are reminded that U.S. immigration
     regulations mandate that both parents must sign the completed
     I-600 petition.  If only one of the adopting parents is
     traveling to China remember that blank petitions signed by the
     absent parent or a power of attorney authorizing one parent to
     sign for the other are not acceptable.
     
     For detailed information on adoption procedures for China,
     please send an 8 1/2" by 11" self addressed stamped envelope
     with $3.00 in postage to:  China Adoptions, Office of
     Children's Issues, Room 4811, Department of State, Washington
     D.C., 20520-4818.
     

                       INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION - CHINA
     
                                                                     
     DISCLAIMER:  THE INFORMATION IN THIS CIRCULAR RELATING TO THE
     LEGAL REQUIREMENTS OF SPECIFIC FOREIGN COUNTRIES IS PROVIDED
     FOR GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY AND MAY NOT BE TOTALLY ACCURATE IN
     A PARTICULAR CASE.  QUESTIONS INVOLVING INTERPRETATION OF
     SPECIFIC FOREIGN LAWS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO A FOREIGN ATTORNEY.
     
                             TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                           Page
     Disclaimer .........................................    1
     Table of Contents ..................................    1-2
     
     INTRODUCTION                                            3
         Proviso ........................................    3
         General Summary.................................    3-6
         Time Frame .....................................    7
         Eligibility - Please Note ......................    8
     
     ADOPTING IN CHINA                                       8
     
     General
         Chinese Adoption Authority .....................    8-10
         Availability of Children For Adoption ..........   10
         Chinese Adoption Law ...........................   10
         Children Eligible for Adoption .................   10
         Note:  What Constitutes Handicapped ............   11
         Note:  What Constitutes Orphaned in China ......   12
         Age and Civil Status Requirements ..............   13
         Note:  Adopting Multiple Children ..............   13
         Residence Requirements for Adoptive Parents ....   14
         Note:  Powers of Attorney ......................   14
     
     HOW TO BEGIN                                           14
     
         Acting On Your Own Behalf ......................   14
         Selecting Licensed Adoption Agency .............   14-15
         Note:  Working With Adoption Agency/Contact ....   15
         Agencies Submitting Credentials     ............   15
         The Adoption Application .......................   15-16
         Chinese Documentary Requirements ...............   16
         Skipping Steps May Result in Failure to Adopt ..   16
         What Documents Are Required ....................   17-18
         Translation Requirements .......................   18
         Authentication Requirements ....................   18-20
         Special Instructions for Persons Born
           or Married in Third Countries ................   20-21
         Chinese Embassy and Consulates in U.S. .........   21
     

     FINALIZING THE ADOPTION IN CHINA                       22
         Identifying Child ..............................   22
         Initial Agreement ..............................   22
         Traveling to China .............................   22
         Meeting the Child (Medical Concerns) ...........   22
         The Interview(s) ...............................   22-23
         Child's Chinese Passport and Exit Permit .......   23
         Signing Adoption Contract ......................   23-24
         Problems:  Disruption After Final Adoption .....   24
         Obtaining Translations and Copies of Contract ..   24
         Proof of Abandonment of Infants Under 6 Mos. Old   25
         Chinese Fees ...................................   25
     
     ADOPTIONS NOT IN COMPLIANCE WITH CHINESE LAW           25-26
     
     U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS                          26
     
         Getting Started Early With INS...................  26
         Understanding the Process .......................  26
         Unconditional Abandonment .......................  26-27
         Meeting Definition of Orphan under U.S. 
           Immigration and Naturalization Act   ..........  27
     
     WORKING WITH U.S. CONSULATE ON THE VISA                27
     
         Consular Authority to Approve a Case ............  27
         Filing the I-600 Petition with the Consulate.....  28
         Scheduling Appointment with U.S. Consular Officer  29
         What Documents to Bring to the U.S. Consulate ...  29
         Note:  Additional Documents in Special Cases ....  29
         Note:  Married Couples (Both Haven't Seen Child).  30
         Note:  Powers of Attorney Not Allowed ...........  30
         U.S. Immigration Checklist ......................  31
         U.S. Fees .......................................  31
         Additional Information on U.S. Immigration Process 31-32
     
     OTHER AMERICAN EMBASSY/CONSULATE ASSISTANCE            32
     
     Addresses and Phone Numbers of Embassy and Consulates  32-33
     Hotels in Guangzhou, China ..........................  33-34
     What to Bring for Your New Baby .....................  34
     Doctors .............................................  34
     Interpreters/Translators ............................  34
     Ground Transportation ...............................  34
     Hong Kong Transit Visas for Adopted PRC Children ....  34-36
     
     PROBLEMS                                               36
     
     Office of Overseas Citizens Services, State Department 36
     Office of American Citizens Services-Travel Warnings   36
     Office of Visa Services, State Department ............ 37
     Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) ......... 37
     Expeditious Naturalization of Child as U.S. Citizen .. 37
     
     CONCLUSION ........................................... 37-38
     
     ADDENDA    
         INS Checklist .................................... 39
         Text of Chinese Adoption Law ..................... 40-44
         Text of Chinese Adoption Regulations ............. 45-50
         Map of China - U.S. Consular Districts ........... 51-52
         List of U.S. Consular Districts in China ......... 53

                                INTRODUCTION
     
     PROVISO:  Chinese authorities are extremely sensitive about
     the intrusion of foreign entities.  Adoption is also a     
     sensitive subject in China.  It is therefore advisable for 
     any person interested in adopting a child from China to act
     with discretion and decorum.  High profile attention to    
     adoption in China could curtail or eliminate altogether    
     adoption of Chinese children by persons from countries     
     causing adoption to become the subject of public attention.

     The following is a guideline for U.S. citizens who are
     interested in adopting a child in China and applying for an
     immigrant visa for the child to return to the United States. 
     This process can be expensive, time-consuming and difficult,
     involving complex Chinese and American legal requirements. 
     Adoptions are given careful consideration on a case-by-case
     basis by both Chinese judicial authorities and American
     consular officers to ensure that the legal requirements of both
     countries have been met for the protection of the adoptive
     parent(s), the natural parent(s) and the child.  Interested
     Americans are strongly advised to read the following
     information carefully.  Contact the U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service early in the process, before you have
     identified a specific child to adopt.  Contact American
     consular officials in China before formalizing an adoption
     agreement to ensure that appropriate procedures have been
     followed which will make it possible for the Consulate General
     in Guangzhou to issue a U.S. immigrant visa to the child. 
     Please share your experiences and suggestions about how we can
     improve this information and better assist Americans adopting
     in China.
     
     GENERAL SUMMARY:
     
     The adoption of Chinese children by U.S. citizens in accordance
     with Chinese law and regulations, and immigration of eligible
     Chinese orphans into the United States in accordance with U.S.
     immigration laws is operating successfully with minimal
     difficulty.  Adoptions must be arranged through the China
     Adoption Organization (CAO) or local Ministry of
     Justice/Ministry of Civil Affairs provincial offices.  Only
     children for whom a Chinese adoption notarial certificate has
     been issued will be issued a Chinese passport and exit permit
     by Chinese authorities an thus be permitted to leave China.  

     U.S. immigrant visas can only be issued after a Chinese
     adoption notarial certificate has been issued.  In addition to
     meeting the requirements of Chinese adoption law, prospective
     adoptive parents should be sure to contact the U.S. Immigration
     and Naturalization Service office nearest them very early in
     the process, before applying to Chinese authorities, to ensure
     that all requirements of U.S. law are met.
     
     The Chinese adoption law has specific provisions as to what
     children are available for adoption and what adoptive parents
     are acceptable.  These variables are discussed more fully
     below.  The law differentiates between an abandoned child (with
     one or both parents living) and an orphan under Chinese law
     (both parents deceased).  The law restricts adoption of healthy
     abandoned children with one or both parents living to childless
     persons (including birth and adopted children) 35 years old or
     older, and only permits the adoption of one child.  There are
     exceptions if you are adopting a relative's child.  Persons who
     are under 35 years old and/or who already have children are
     only permitted to adopt orphans (requiring proof that both
     parents are deceased) or handicapped children.  Persons seeking
     to adopt orphans (requiring proof that both parents are
     deceased) or handicapped children are permitted by Chinese law
     to adopt more than one child.  The Chinese adoption law permits
     adoption by married couples and single persons.
     
     U.S. citizens interested in adopting a child from China may
     retain the services of an adoption agency or intermediary whose
     credentials have been reviewed and accepted by competent
     Chinese authorities from the Ministries of Justice or Civil
     Affairs in the Chinese Adoption Organization (CAO).  Chinese
     regulations also permit private adoptions arranged through the
     China Adoption Organization (CAO).  However, individuals should
     be aware that between April 1, 1992 (when the China Adoption
     law was implemented) and December 1, 1994, the Department of
     State in Washington and the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in
     China are aware of very few cases where individuals succeeded
     in arranging a private adoption without the use of an agency or
     intermediary through the CAO.  Although the CAO reviews the
     licenses and professional credentials of all such agencies,
     attorneys or intermediaries, China does not formally approve or
     authorize specifies agencies or intermediaries at the present
     time.  Information about agencies currently involved in China
     adoptions may be obtained from Adoptive Families of America,
     3333 Highway 100 North, Minneapolis, MN  55422, tel: 
     1-800-372-3300 or 612-535-4829, an adoptive parents support
     organization not involved in direct placement.  Persons
     interested in adopting children from China are urged to follow
     the guidance in this flyer carefully regarding preparation of
     documents and other procedures.  When placement of a child for
     adoption has been initially approved, the CAO advance working
     group will issue an approval notice (Notice of Coming to China
     for Adoption).  It is then necessary to travel to China to
     complete the adoption.  The prospective adoptive parent(s)
     should have the approval notice in hand before departing for
     China.  Prospective adoptive parents should be wary of promises
     that an adoption has been initially approved if an agency or
     intermediary is unable to provide a copy of the CAO approval
     notice.  A parent or parents proceeding to China to complete
     the adoption process should plan on at least four days in
     Guangzhou, China to allow the U.S. Consulate General there to
     process the immigrant visa.  Same day interview and visa
     issuance is not possible.  The adoptive parent should contact
     the Consulate to arrange an appointment only when they are
     nearing the end of or have completed the adoption process in
     China.
     
     Copies of the People's Republic of China (PRC) 11/13/93
     regulations to implement the China adoption law of April 1,
     1992 are annexed to this flyer.  The new Chinese adoption
     regulations and the China adoption law relate to all adoptions
     of Chinese children, including adoption by foreigners.  
     
     
     APPLYING FOR ADOPTION IN CHINA:
     
     Both the PRC Ministries of Justice and Civil Affairs are
     accepting applications for adoption by foreigners.  The
     Ministry of Justice advises that it accepts applications from
     individuals or agencies.  The Ministry of Civil Affairs advises
     that it will accept applications only from adoption agencies,
     not from individuals.  An original and two authenticated copies
     of the application and accompanying documents must be presented
     either to the Ministry of Justice or the Ministry of Civil
     Affairs.  All documents must be authenticated by the PRC
     Embassy or Consulate in the United States.  The Ministry of
     Justice advises that its initial fee is U.S. $300.00, but could
     go as high as U.S. $500.00 if translation or other extra
     services by MOJ staff become necessary.  The Ministry of Civil
     Affairs advises that its initial fee is U.S. $300.00.  The
     translations for either the MOJ or the MOCA can be done in the
     United States or China; however, the Ministry of Justice
     advises that the translations must be "correct" and that MOJ
     will "rectify" any errors (which could account for some extra
     cost above the initial $300.00.)  Regardless of which Ministry
     receives the application, it must be vetted and approved by
     both Ministries at a meeting of the China Adoption
     Organization's Advance Working Group before the application is
     "approved."  
     

     SUBMISSION OF CREDENTIALS BY ADOPTION AGENCY, INTERMEDIARY OR
     INDIVIDUAL:
     
     The new PRC regulations provide in part that the adopter may
     only adopt one child and that applications for adoption must be
     made to the CAO through an adoption agency "entrusted by the
     adopter's country's government".  The regulations require that
     applications for adoption be submitted either by "the
     government" or "the adoption agency entrusted by the
     government" of the prospective adopting parents.  Officers of
     the U.S. Department of State are prohibited by Federal
     regulations from acting as agents or attorneys on behalf of
     U.S. citizens in private legal matters.  Since Chinese
     officials have been informed that the U.S. Government does not
     submit applications on behalf of parents or authorize adoption
     agencies to do so, the CAO advance working group has indicated
     that it will accept such applications directly from individual
     U.S. citizens or U.S. adoption agencies filing on behalf of an
     individual.  Adoption agencies should be state-licensed, and
     must have previously submitted a letter of introduction with
     copies of its license and corporate documents (e.g. articles,
     officers, etc.) directly to either Chinese Ministry.  These
     documents must be authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or
     consulate in the United States and accompanied by a Chinese
     translation.  Individuals will likewise be required by PRC 
     authorities to present documentary evidence of their bona
     fides, including, for example, copies of licenses, bar
     association membership, and state laws permitting the
     individual to act as an intermediary in an adoption.
     
         Licensed U.S. adoption agencies may submit their
     credentials directly to the CAO advance working group. 
     Agencies in states with no laws or regulations on adoption and
     no licensing procedures may not be eligible to the CAO to
     submit applications for adoption.
     
        Agencies which successfully arranged adoptions previously
     should not assume that the CAO has automatically accepted their
     previously submitted credentials as sufficient to submit
     applications.  Agencies should contact the CAO directly to
     confirm that adoption applications submitted by the agency will
     be accepted by the CAO.
     
        The CAO advance working group has not publicized under what
     circumstances applications forwarded directly by individuals
     other than prospective adoptive parents themselves may be
     accepted.  Prospective adoptive parents may therefore wish to
     ask individuals (not licensed agencies) assisting in
     facilitating adoptions in China for evidence that the CAO has
     confirmed it will accept applications submitted by the
     particular individual.

     
     REFERRAL OR PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN:
     
     Both the MOJ and the MOCA advise that they will supply
     referrals (baby pictures, health records, etc.) only after
     having received an application (dossier) from prospective
     adoptive parent(s) either directly or through an adoption
     agency as specified above.  The MOJ and MOCA continue to refer
     babies from the child welfare institutes with which particular
     U.S. adoption agencies are familiar.  The CAO maintains control
     and acts as the go-between between the child welfare institutes
     and the U.S. adoption agencies or parent(s).  Agencies without
     prior relationships with local institutes receive child
     referrals from the CAO and their applicants are then sent to
     whatever province they are referred by CAO.
     
     CHINA ADOPTION ORGANIZATION (CAO):
     
     China is in the process of taking the necessary measures to
     bring the new regulations into full force.  The regulations 
     establish a new Chinese Government entity, the CHINA ADOPTION
     ORGANIZATION (CAO) in Beijing to implement the China adoption
     law.  All adoption aplications must be betted and approved by
     both Ministries of Justice and Civil Affairs at a meeting of
     the China Adoption Organization's Advance Working Group before
     the application is approved.  Prospective adoptive parents or 
     their agencies may suggest to the CAO a specific child in a
     Child Welfare Institute (orphanage), or from which specific
     Child Welfare Institute, or from which city, county, province
     they wish to adopt (being mindful that the child must meet the
     definition of orphan under U.S. Immigration law).  The CAO
     replaces the former China Center for Adoption Affairs.  The new
     CAO, a joint entity to be formed under both the Ministry of
     Civil Affairs and the Ministry of Justice is not yet fully
     operational.  
     
     PRC ADVANCE WORKING GROUP ON ADOPTIONS:
     
     In February 1994, officials of the Chinese Ministries of
     Justice and Civil Affairs responsible for adoption matters
     informed the U.S. Embassy in Beijing that an advance working
     group of the CAO had been formed.  This advance working group
     is now accepting applications by foreigners for adoption in
     China and issuing approval notices required under the November
     1993 Chinese adoption regulations.  The advance working group
     is comprised of a total of six Chinese officials, three each
     from the Chinese Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Civil
     Affairs.  
     

     APPROVAL NOTICES:
     
     When the advance working group issues an approval notice
     ("Notice of Coming to China for Adoption"), this notice will
     bear the "chops", or red-inked seals, of both Ministries.
     
     The CAO will send an approval letter to prospective adoptive
     parents.  After receiving the initial approval letter,
     prospective adoptive parents may then proceed to travel to the
     locality in China where the child is to complete the adoption
     process.  Parents will not be required to travel to Beijing for
     approval.  PROSPECTIVE ADOPTIVE PARENTS SHOULD HAVE THIS
     APPROVAL NOTICE IN HAND BEFORE DEPARTING FOR CHINA.  Local
     Chinese Child Welfare Institutes, provincial Chinese Civil
     Affairs officials and Chinese notarial offices should not
     process adoptions unless they have seen the notice.  Thus any
     parents already in China without the approval notice will most
     likely be required to obtain this approval notice from the CAO
     in Beijing before the adoption process can be completed.  The
     U.S. Embassy in Beijing cautions that since the CAO advance
     working group is new, it is likely that interpretations of the
     Chinese adoption regulations will be subject to change over
     time.  We have no indication when the CAO will formally open
     and hope to be able to provide this information at a later
     date.  We will continue to monitor the situation and keep
     interested persons informed of developments.
     
     GENERAL PROVISIONS OF PRC ADOPTION LAW:
     
        Only full adoptions completed in China are permitted.  It is
     not possible to obtain guardianship of a Chinese child for
     adoption in the United States.  
     
        The China Adoption Law has specific provisions as to what
     children are available for adoption and what adoptive parents
     are acceptable.  These variables are discussed more fully on
     pages 10 and 11.  
     
        The law differentiates between an abandoned child (with one
     or both parents living) and an orphan under Chinese law (both
     parents deceased).
     
        The law restricts adoption of healthy abandoned children
     with one or both parents living to childless persons 35 years
     old or older, and only permits the adoption of one child. 
     There are exceptions if you are adopting a relative's child.
     
        Persons who are under 35 years old and/or who already have
     child(ren) are only permitted to adopt orphans (requiring proof
     that both parents are deceased) or handicapped children.  
     
        Persons seeking to adopt orphans (requiring proof that both
     parents are deceased) or handicapped children are permitted by
     Chinese law to adopt more than one such child.
     
        Only children for whom a Chinese adoption notarial
     certificate has been issued will be issued a Chinese passport
     and exit permit by Chinese authorities and thus be permitted to
     leave China.
     
        U.S. immigrant visas can only be issued after a Chinese
     adoption notarial certificate has been issued.
     
     TIME FRAME
     
     It is hard to predict with any certainty how much time is
     required to complete an adoption in China.   Since the China 
     Adoption Organization (CAO) only begin preliminary operation in
     February 1994, there is no track record for how long the
     preliminary review and processing of applications and
     supporting documentation and identification and matching of a
     child by the CAO will take.  With regard to the time required,
     once initial approval has been granted and adoptive parent(s)
     travel to China to finalize an adoption, the CAO has advised
     local Welfare Institutes and Civil Affairs Bureaus to try to
     complete the process, to the extent possible, within 15 days of
     the adoptive parent(s) arrival in China.  The Chinese passport,
     exit permits and U.S. visa process can take another 7-10 days
     after the adoption is finalized.  Recent experiences provided
     by families who have completed adoptions in China indicate that
     they have been able to complete the process, including
     obtaining the U.S. immigrant visa for the adoptive child, in 
     approximately two weeks, an improvement over the previous
     situation where some cases took 4-8 weeks to resolve.  
     
     

     ELIGIBILITY:  PLEASE NOTE:  Adopting parents must assume     
     personal responsibility for clarifying any questions about   
     their own eligibility to adopt and the child's eligibility to
     be adopted under Chinese law.  Adopting parent(s) who them-  
     selves do not meet the criteria of Chinese law, or who are   
     attempting to adopt a child who does not meet the definition 
     of an adoptable child under Chinese law, are condemning      
     themselves to possible bitter disappointment.  The United    
     States government cannot assist prospective adoptive         
     parent(s) in any effort to circumvent local law.  Moreover,  
     effective October , 1992, adoptions not clearly approvable  
     for a U.S. immigrant visa will be referred by the U.S.       
     Consulate General in Guangzhou to the U.S. Immigration and   
     Naturalization Service in Hong Kong for review.  This may in 
     some instances lead to denial or delay in approval of the    
     I-600 U.S. immigrant visa petition for the child, and        
     issuance of the U.S. visa.  Ignorance of Chinese or U.S. law 
     and mistaken trust in the promises of unscrupulous           
     intermediaries about ways around the law can only result in  
     failure to succeed in an adoption.                           


     
                        ADOPTING IN CHINA - GENERAL
     
     CHINESE ADOPTION AUTHORITY
     
     CHINA ADOPTION ORGANIZATION:    Effective November 13, 1993,
     the China Adoption Organization is responsible for centralized
     coordination of adoption of Chinese children by foreigners with
     the various Chinese government agencies which play a role in
     adoptions.  The CAO includes six staff members from three each
     from the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Civil
     Affairs.  The CAO's functions include accepting applications
     from individuals and foreign (U.S.) licensed adoption agencies,
     coordination between foreign adoption agencies and provincial
     Children's Welfare Institutes to identify and place a child,
     and coordination with foreign adoption agencies for review of
     documents necessary for consideration of adoption by provincial
     notarial office.  It is hoped that the CAO will eliminate many
     of the problems which have arisen since the enactment of the 
     new adoption law on April 1, 1992.  There is no address or
     telephone number for the CAO at present.  Effective February 15,
     1994, the advance working group of the CAO was formed. 
     Applications filed by individuals or agencies should be sent to 
     the CAO advance working group in care of one of the following
     officials:
     
     LIU Nanzheng, Chief, Division of Civil Affairs,
     Department of Notarization,
     Ministry of Justice
     No. 11 Xiaguang Li
     San Yuan Qiao
     Beijing, China  100016
     tel:  (86)(1) 467-7144 ext. 276; fax:  (86)(1) 466-2687
     
     ZHANG Xiaoquing, Division Chief,
     c/o Department of International Cooperation
     Ministry of Civil Affairs
     No. 147 Beiheyan Street
     Beijing, China 100721
     tel:  (86)(1) 512-1882
     
     OTHER RESPONSIBLE CHINESE AUTHORITIES:  Responsibility for the
     various procedures necessary to adopt a child in China in
     accordance with Chinese law is divided among the following
     Chinese government authorities:
     

     CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU:  China's provincial and county Civil
     Affairs Bureaus are formally responsible for orphaned or
     abandoned children.  The Civil Affairs Bureaus are governed by
     the MINISTRY OF CIVIL AFFAIRS, Department of Administration of
     Marital Affairs, No. 147 Beiheyan Street, Beijing, 100032
     China.  Civil Affairs Bureaus in each province and many
     counties operate public Children's Welfare Institutes.  
     
     CHILDREN'S WELFARE INSTITUTE (SHEHUI FULI JIGOU):  Children's
     Welfare Institutes are administered by the Ministry of Civil
     Affairs through provincial Civil Affairs Bureaus.  These are
     government operated homes for orphaned or abandoned children. 
     Children can only be placed in the Welfare Institutes if their
     parents have died or abandoned them or if they are handicapped
     and their parents are unable to care for them.  In cases of
     abandoned children, the authorities attempt to locate the
     children's parents before allowing them to be adopted from the
     Institutes.  Handicapped children can be placed in such
     Institutes by their natural parents, however and such children
     cannot always be considered orphans for the purposes of U.S.
     immigration law since this requires irrevocable release of
     parental rights.
     
     NOTARIAL OFFICES:  The Provincial Notarial Offices, which are
     administered by the MINISTRY OF JUSTICE, Department of
     Notarization Division of Civil Affairs, No. 11 Xiaguangli, San
     Yuan Qiao, Beijing, 100016 China, issue the final adoption
     certificate.  That process terminates parental rights of the
     natural parent(s).  Each adoption certificate is accompanied by 
     a notarial birth certificate for the child and either a 
     statement explaining the circumstances of abandonment for
     abandoned children or notarial death certificates of the 
     child's parents.
     
     PUBLIC SECURITY BUREAU:  The Public Security Bureau in the
     locality where the adoption takes place is responsible for
     issuing Chinese passports and exit permits to children adopted
     by foreigners.
     
     Hospitals:  Adopting parents should be aware that under the new
     law, it is not permissible for a hospital to release a child
     directly to prospective parents for adoption.
     

     AVAILABILITY OF CHILDREN FOR ADOPTION:  Only children from a
     Children's Welfare Institute are available for adoption.  These
     children are matched with a prospective adoptive parent(s) by
     the CAO through a U.S. licensed adoption agency, whose
     credentials have been submitted to the CAO.  The U.S. Consulate
     General in Guangzhou is the only consular post in China which
     issues immigrant visas.  Recent immigrant visa statistics
     reflect the following pattern for visa issuance to orphans* (as
     that term is understood in U.S. immigration law.)
     
                  IR-3 Immigrant Visas   IR-4 Immigrant Visas
     Fiscal       Issued to Chinese      Issued to Chinese
     Year     Orphans Adopted Abroad  Orphans Adopted in U.S.*  Total
     
     FY-1988                  11                        1       12
     FY-1989                  16                        1       17
     FY-1990                  29                        -       29
     FY-1991                  60                        1       61
     FY-1992                 196                       30      226
     FY-1993                 298                       32      330
     FY-1994                 650                      137      787
     
                    CHINESE ADOPTION LAW AND REGULATIONS
     
     The text of the China Adoption Regulations of November 13,
     1993, published in the local legal daily newspaper (Fazhi
     Ribao) and the China Adoption Law of April 1, 1992, provided by
     the Hague Conference on Private International Law, are annexed
     to this information flyer.
     
     CHILDREN ELIGIBLE FOR ADOPTION:
     
     The Adoption Law of the People's Republic of China adopted by
     the 23rd meeting of the seventh National People's Congress
     Standing Committee on December 29, 1991, effective April 1, 
     1992 provides that, with certain exceptions, children under the 
     age of 14 in the following categories may be adopted:
     
        "(a)  Orphans who lost their parent(s);
        "(b)  Abandoned children whose natural parents cannot be 
              found;
        "(c)  Children whose natural parents are incapable of 
              providing for them because of unusual hardship."
     
     The Ministry of Civil Affairs and the Ministry of Justice have
     advised the American Embassy in Beijing that the above
     categories as defined under the new adoption law mean:
     
     a)  An orphan** is a child whose parents are deceased.
     b)  An abandoned child is a child who has been abandoned by the 
         parents or guardians.
     c)  A child "whose natural parents are incapable of providing
     for them because of unusual hardship" is a handicapped child.
     
     PLEASE NOTE:  What Constitutes Handicapped:  China Adoption
     authorities advise the American Embassy in Beijing that
     children are designated as handicapped according to the
     criteria of handicapped children approved by the State Council
     in October 1986.  There are five categories for handicapped
     children:  defects in vision, hearing and language, mental
     deficiency (such as low I.Q. and development),
     handicap/impairment of arms and legs, and mental illness.  The 
     determination is made on the basis of "hindrance or loss of
     social function".  The Ministry of Civil Affairs indicated that
     after review and investigation, it may establish additional
     criteria for handicapped children.  The Embassy has noted
     
                        
     
     * Under the New Chinese Adoption Law, all adoptions must be
     full and final in China.  Children can no longer be released by
     a parent or guardian for adoption in the United States. 
     However, under U.S. immigration law, an IR-3 visa can only be
     issued to a child who has been fully adopted abroad and whose
     adoptive parent(s) have met INS requirements and any state
     pre-adoption requirements.  If a child has been fully and
     finally adopted in China (Chinese notarial certificate issued),
     but the adopting parent(s) have not met all U.S. immigration or
     state pre-adoption requirements, an IR-4 visa will be issued
     and the child must be adopted in the U.S. in order to meet
     these U.S. immigration requirements.  This is not to suggest
     that the Chinese adoption is not full and final and as such
     recognized by states in the United States.  Rather, adoption in
     the U.S. is required in these IR-4 cases because adoptive
     parent(s) have not met all the U.S. requirements.
     a certain leniency regarding what constitutes handicapped at
     the local level in China.  If a case comes up for scrutiny at
     the central level, more restrictive guidelines are applied. 
     Economic hardship is not/not a handicap.
     

     Some infirmities which might be considered a handicap in the
     United States are not considered to be a handicap in China. 
     For example, the Embassy is aware of a case involving a child
     born with only one ear.  The impairment was not considered a
     handicap under China's Adoption Law since it could be corrected
     by surgery.  Prospective adoptive parents should be very clear
     in their applications as to whether they are interested in
     adopting a handicapped child.  The medical report provided by
     the CAO should provide specific details about any handicap or
     medical abnormality which does not constitute a handicap under
     Chinese law.  When in doubt about the specificity of
     information received, prospective adoptive parent(s) should
     feel free to request clarification from Chinese authorities
     directly or through their U.S. licensed adoption agency.  If at
     any time prior to signing the final contract adopting parent(s)
     believe that a handicap or medical condition not defined as a
     handicap under Chinese law may be more serious than presented
     in medical reports, an independent medical examination may be
     desirable and should be requested.  It is not clear that this
     is permitted under Chinese procedures.  Lists of physicians are
     available from the U.S. embassy or consulates.  After the final
     adoption contract has been signed and the notarial instrument
     issued, revelation of previously undisclosed medical problems
     during U.S. visa medical examination by a U.S. embassy or
     consulate designated physician should be immediately reported
     to the American Embassy/Consulate. 
     
                     
     
     **Please Note:  The definition of orphan under Chinese law is
     different from the definition of orphan under U.S.           
     immigration law (INA).  Satisfying the requirements of one   
     country will not necessarily satisfy the requirements of the 
     other country's law.  This is important to understand because
     in order to adopt a child and bring that child to the U.S., a
     child must be fully and finally adopted under Chinese law    
     and must meet the requirements of U.S. immigration law.


     AGE AND CIVIL STATUS REQUIREMENTS FOR ADOPTIVE PARENT(s):  
     

     Sec. PRC Law     Adoptive Parent(s)   Adoptive Children      
                                                                  
     Art. 6            Age 35 or older    Children Abandoned to   
                       Childless          Child Welfare Centers   
                       Adopting Only      (Parents cannot be found
                       One Child           or have relinquished   
                                           parental rights to Ctr)
                                                                  
     Art. 8, para 2    Age 35 or older    Restriction on Adopting 
                       Not Childless      More Than One Child May 
                       May Adopt More     Be Waived When Adopting 
                       Than One Child*    Orphans (Parents Dead)  
                                          or Handicapped Children 
                                                                  
     Art. 7            Age 34 or under    Restriction on Age of   
                       Not Childless      Adopting Parent(s) and  
     Art. 8, para 2    May Adopt More     Restriction on Adopting 
                       Than One Child*    More Than One Child May 
                                          Be Waived When Adopting 
                                          Children Who Are Blood  
                                          Relatives of Adopting   
                                          Parent(s), Children who 
                                          are Orphans (Parents    
                                          Dead), or Handicapped   
                                          Children                
                                                                  
     Art. 10           Unmarried          All above age           
     (implied)                            restrictions, limitation
                                          re number of children   
                                          and category of children
                                          apply                   
                                                                  
     Art. 9            Unmarried Male     If adopting female child
                                          adoptive parent must be 
                                          40 years older than     
                                          adoptee                 


     
     * PLEASE NOTE:  Adopting Multiple Children:  All requests to
     adopt more than one child are given special consideration by
     Chinese authorities, processed on a case-by-case basis.  In
     cases involving the adoption of more than one child to date,
     Chinese authorities have looked carefully at the age of other
     child(ren) in the home, nature of the handicap involved (if
     any), age and health of the adoptive parent(s), adoptive
     parent(s)' physical and emotional ability to care for two or
     more children and financial ability to raise more than one
     child.
     

     RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADOPTIVE PARENT(S):
     
     The adoptive parent(s) must come to China to execute the
     required documents in person before the appropriate Chinese 
     authorities to finalize the adoption.  If the adoptor is
     married, he or she should adopt the child together with the 
     spouse (Article 10).  In the case of married couples, if only
     one adopting parent comes to China, Chinese law requires that
     the spouse traveling to China bring a power of attorney* from
     his or her spouse which has been notarized and properly
     authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or one of the Chinese
     Consulates General in the United States (see page 16-19). In
     addition to documents required by the Chinese Government, the
     American Consulate in Guangzhou advises that if only one parent
     is coming to China to adopt, if adopting a child with a
     physical or mental disability -- a notarized statement from the
     absent parent indicating that they are aware of the child's
     disability and intends to finalize the adoption in the United
     States as required under U.S. law.
     
     **PLEASE NOTE:  POWERS OF ATTORNEY:  The U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service does not allow the use of powers of   
     attorney for the purpose of signing the I 600 Petition to    
     Classify an Orphan as an Immediate Relative.  See discussion 
     on page .

                                HOW TO BEGIN
     
     Applications for adoption in China must be made by a U.S.
     licensed adoption agency whose credentials have been submitted
     to the CAO or directly by individuals.
     
     ACTING ON YOUR OWN BEHALF WITHOUT AN ADOPTION AGENCY:  You will
     need to translate all your communications with the CAO into
     Chinese and translate the CAO's communications with you into
     English.
     
     SELECTING AN ADOPTION AGENCY OR INTERMEDIARY:
     
     If you chose to employ the services of an adoption agency or
     intermediary, it is prudent to take certain basic steps to
     confirm the bona fides of the individual or entity with which
     you are dealing.
     
        Contact a licensed U.S. adoption agency which establishes to
     your satisfaction that it has submitted its credentials to the
     CAO.
     
        The Attorney General's Office of your state should be able
     to advise you what State Government Agency in your state is
     authorized to license adoption agencies.  Your state Better
     Business Bureau may also be able to advise you whether any
     complaints have been filed against a particular adoption agency
     or intermediary.  Your state bar association may have similar
     information regarding attorneys acting in your behalf.
     
        Beware of adoption agencies or intermediaries claiming to be 
     able to arrange adoptions without applying through the CAO in
     Beijing.  Adoptions arranged outside the CAO's procedures may
     never be finalized and adoptive parents may never be able to
     take the children out of China.
     
        The CAO has indicated that it wishes only to deal with
     licensed U.S. adoption agencies or intermediaries whose
     credentials have been submitted to the CAO.  The CAO will also
     accept applications directly from individuals.
     

     **PLEASE NOTE:  WORKING WITH ADOPTION AGENCIES/CONTACTS:     
     Obtain an explanation of fees and services.  Before paying   
     exorbitant fees to agencies or their alleged intermediaries  
     in China, consult the U.S. embassy/consulates.  Assume that  
     promises of streamlining procedures are untrue.  If the      
     agency employs an expediter to meet, transport and act as    
     interpreter for adopting parents in China, be wary of fees   
     not previously mentioned.  Moreover, some agencies claim to  
     have contacts in China to otherwise facilitate adoptions,    
     outside official channels.  Private adoption facilitators are
     prohibited under Chinese law.  Use of such persons could     
     result in failure to adopt a child.  The American Consulate  
     General in Guangzhou has advised some U.S. licensed adoption 
     agencies of activities of so-called facilitators contrary to 
     Chinese law and U.S. immigration procedures making it        
     impossible for a U.S. visa to be issued without referral of  
     the case to INS as "not clearly approvable".

     
     AGENCIES SUBMITTING CREDENTIALS TO CAO:  
     
     The Department of State and the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in
     China cannot assist U.S. licensed adoption agencies in
     submitting credentials to the CAO.  Adoption agencies wishing
     to submit credentials may contact the CAO directly.  Agencies
     in states with no laws or regulations on adoption or no
     licensing requirements may not be eligible for submitting
     applications for adoptions to the CAO.  Questions concerning
     eligibility must be made directly by agencies or intermediaries
     to the CAO.

     INTERMEDIARIES/FACILITATORS:  It is not clear whether the CAO
     will accept applications by non-licensed facilitators.  Such
     questions must be raised directly with the CAO.
     
     
     THE ADOPTION APPLICATION:
     
        An individual or agency may submit applications for adoption
     of a Chinese child directly to the CAO for consideration. 
     Included with the application will be all documents enumerated 
     below.  In addition, indicate any preference for a healthy or
     handicapped child, age and sex of the child and, if desired,
     indicate a specific Welfare Institute or geographic area of
     China in which you are interested.  There is no guarantee that
     you will be assigned to a particular Welfare Institute or
     geographic area of China.
     
        The CAO will review the documents and advise the prospective
     adoptive parent(s) directly or through their U.S. licensed
     adoption agency, whether additional documents or authentication
     is required.
     
     
     CHINESE DOCUMENTARY REQUIREMENTS
     
     Pursuant to Article 20 of the PRC adoption law, a foreigner
     interested in adopting a Chinese child must furnish proof of
     age, marital status, occupation, financial status, health
     condition and police record.  It is advisable to bring several
     copies of the authenticated documentation with you to China in
     addition to the package of documents forwarded by your adoption
     agency to the CAO for approval.  Authentication means that the
     documents must bear the seal of the Embassy or Consulate of
     China in the U.S. in order to be acceptable in China.  This
     requires a chain of certificates.  See pages 18-20.
     

     CAUTION;  BE CAREFUL ABOUT DOCUMENT PREPARATION, TRANSLATIONS
     AND AUTHENTICATION - SKIPPING STEPS MAY RESULT IN FAILURE:   
                                                                  
     A word of caution regarding these documents.  Please note    
     that documents prepared by prospective adoptive parent(s) in 
     support of an adoption in China should not be prepared       
     hastily or with insufficient attention to detail.   Many of  
     the documents seen by the American Embassy and the Consulate 
     General in Guangzhou have been poorly prepared.  Some of the 
     documents were disassembled (the brad or grommet removed     
     after the document had been authenticated by Chinese         
     consular authorities in the U.S.), and documents were added  
     or removed.  Such action invalidates the authentication and  
     the documents will be rejected by Chinese authorities and may
     not be acceptable for U.S. immigrant visa purposes as well.  
     Shortcuts to attempt to save the cost of authenticating and  
     translating each document will only result in more expenses  
     or failure to adopt.

     
     What Documents are Required:
     
        Certified and authenticated copies of the adoptive
     parent(s)' birth certificate(s).
     
        Certified and authenticated copy of the adoptive parent(s)'
     marriage certificate (if applicable) and proof of termination
     of any previous marriage (certified copy of spouse's death
     certificate of divorce decree).
     
        Medical certificate(s) for adoptive parent(s) executed by
     physician before a notary public and authenticated.
     
        Statement that adoptive parent(s) is/are childless and have
     not adopted other children (notarized and authenticated).
     
        A medical certificate of infertility, if that condition
     exists (executed by a physician before a notary public and
     authenticated).  (Note:  Infertility is no longer a requirement
     for adoption in China.)
     
        A certificate of good conduct for the adoptive parent(s)
     from a local police department notarized or bearing police
     department seal and authenticated.  An FBI report is acceptable
     in lieu of a local police record.  This is separate from the
     FBI check conducted by INS as part of the petition process. 
     You can request an FBI record check by sending two sets of 
     fingerprints, a $17.00 money order, your full name, date and
     place of birth, social security number and letter of request
     explaining purpose for the clearance to:  FBI ID Division, Room
     10104, Washington, D.C.  20537-9700.  The FBI certificate
     should also be authenticated as explained below.
     
        Verification of employment and salary notarized and
     authenticated.
     
        Two letters of reference notarized and authenticated.
     
        A certified and authenticated copy of your property trust
     deeds, if applicable.
     
        A home study prepared by an authorized and licensed social
     agency certified and authenticated.
     
        Bank statements notarized/certified and authenticated.
     
        Power of attorney (if only one spouse will travel to China)
     notarized and authenticated.
     
        Family letter of intent to adopt, describing child adoptive
     parent(s) is/are willing to adopt (being mindful of Chinese law
     regarding eligible children) notarized and authenticated.
     
        Power of Attorney.  In the case of married couples, if only
     one adopting parent comes to China, Chinese law requires that
     the spouse traveling to China bring a power of attorney from
     his or her spouse which has been notarized and properly
     authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or one of the Chinese
     Consulates General in the United States (see pages 16-19).  But
     see notes on pages 10 and 26 on the use of powers of attorney
     which are not acceptable to INS.
     
     Translation Requirements:
     
     All documents prepared for transmission to Chinese adoption
     authorities must be accompanied by a certified Chinese
     translation.  The translator must execute a statement before a
     notary public as to the validity of the translation.  The
     notary's seal must then be authenticated as explained below.
     
     Authentication Requirements:
     
     All foreign (U.S.) documents must be authenticated for use in
     China.  Keep in mind that the purpose of having documents
     authenticated is to verify their contents and validity of the
     issuing authority.  Some documents have been rejected because
     the seals they bore did not serve that purpose.  For example,
     if the translator's affidavit only confirms the identity and
     signature of the translator, but does not attest to the
     validity of the translation, this is insufficient under Chinese
     law.  Likewise, a notary public in one state cannot legally
     certify the contents of a civil document, such as a birth or
     marriage record issued in another state.  A notarized certified
     true copy is not an authenticated copy of a civil record.  A
     certified copy must be obtained from the bureau of vital
     statistics which maintains the original record.  A summary of
     the authentication process is provided in the following chart
     and narrative on pages 16-19.
     
     
                            AUTHENTICATION CHART
     
     Affidavits, Powers of Attorney, Deeds ...
     

     
      NOTARY     ... CLERK OF COUNTY COURT  ...STATE SECRETARY
      PUBLIC         WHERE NOTARY LICENSED       OF STATE     

                                                                    

          U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE   ....   CHINESE EMBASSY OR  
           AUTHENTICATIONS OFFICE           CONSULATE IN U.S.   

                                                                    
                                                                    
     District of Columbia ....                                      
                                                                    

      NOTARY     ... DISTRICT BUILDING     ...                  
      PUBLIC         717 14th St NW Rm 230                       

                                                                    

           U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE   ....   CHINESE EMBASSY OR 
           AUTHENTICATIONS OFFICE            CONSULATE IN U.S.  

                                                                    
                                                                     
     Documents from State Agencies (Birth, Death, Marriage          
                                    Certificates, State Court       
                                    Documents)                      
                                                                    

     STATE        STATE SECRETARY    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
     AGENCY OR  ..   OF STATE      .. AUTHENTICATIONS OFFICE .
     COURT

                                                                    

     ... CHINESE EMBASSY OR                                       
         CONSULATE IN U.S.                                        

                                                                    
     Documents from Federal Agencies or Departments ...             
                                                                    

     FEDERAL  ... U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE ..CHINESE EMBASSY  
     AGENCY        AUTHENTICATIONS OFFICE    OR CONSULATE     

     
     Documents issued in Federal Court ...                          
                                                                    

     FEDERAL .. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE  ...                      
     COURT      JUSTICE MANAGEMENT                              
     .            SECURITY PROGRAM STAFF                          
                  ROOM 6521 Main Justice                          
                  Washington, D.C. 20530                          


           U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE  ... CHINESE EMBASSY OR     
            AUTHENTICATIONS OFFICE       CONSULATE IN U.S.      

     
     Authentication Summary:
     
        Generally, U.S. civil records, such as birth, death, and
     marriage certificates must bear the seal of the issuing office,
     then be authenticated by the state Secretary of State in your
     state capital, then by the U.S. Department of State
     Authentications Office, then by the Chinese Embassy or
     Consulate in the United States.  
     
        Check with the Chinese Consulate in the U.S. with
     jurisdiction over your state to see what seals and signatures
     the Consulate can authenticate.  It may be possible to
     eliminate some of the authentication steps if the Consulate has
     the seal of the local issuing authority on file.
     
        Tax returns, medical reports and police clearances should
     likewise be authenticated, beginning with the seal of a notary
     public in the United States or some appropriate issuing 
     office.  The notary's seal should be authenticated by the clerk 
     of court of the county where the notary is licensed or some
     similar authority.  The document should then be authenticated
     by the state Secretary of State (in your state capital), the
     U.S. Department of State Authentications Office, and the
     Chinese Embassy or Consulate.  
     
        The U.S. Department of State Authentications Office is
     located at 2400 M Street, N.W., Room 101, Washington, D.C. 
     20520, tel:  (202) 647-5002.  Walk-in service is available 
     8 a.m. to 12 noon Monday-Friday, except holidays.  The
     Department charges $4.00 per document for this service, payable
     in the form of a check drawn on a U.S. bank or money order made
     payable to the Department of State.  
     
     Special Instructions For Persons Born or Married in Third
     Countries:  Individuals who were born or married in third 
     countries should have their birth or marriage certificates
     authenticated by the issuing authorities, and then
     authenticated by the American Embassy in the country in which
     the birth or marriage took place for a fee of $10.00 per
     document payable to the American Embassy.  Such documents must
     then be authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or Consulate in
     that country if one exists.  If not, the document bearing the 
     seal of the American Embassy must be forwarded to the U.S.
     Department of State Authentications Office for authentication
     of the American Embassy's seal for a fee of $4.00 payable to
     the Department of State.  It will then be necessary to obtain
     the seal of the Embassy of China in Washington, D.C.  
     Individuals born abroad who acquired U.S. citizenship at birth 
     and whose parents applied for Foreign Service Reports of Birth
     for them at the American Embassy or Consulate may obtain a 
     Certification of Birth Abroad by contacting the U.S. Department
     of State, Office of Passport Services, Correspondence Branch, 
     1425 K Street, Room 386, N.W., Washington, D.C.  20522-1705,
     tel:  (202) 647-0518.  There is a fee of $10.00 payable to the
     Department of State for this service.  This document would then
     have to be authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or Consulate.
     
     ADDRESSES OF CHINESE EMBASSY AND CONSULATES IN THE U.S.
     
     Embassy of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section 
     2300 Connecticut Avenue, N.W.
     Washington, D.C.  20008              tel:  (202) 328-2500
     
     Consulate General of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section
     501 Shatto Place
     Los Angeles, CA  90020              tel:  (213) 380-3105
     
     Consulate General of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section
     1450 Laguna St.
     San Francisco, CA  94115            tel:  (415) 563-4885
     
     Consulate General of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section
     104 S. Michigan Avenue
     Suites 425, 408, 815, 820 and 900
     Chicago, Illinois  60603            tel:  (312) 346-0287
     
     Consulate General of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section
     520 12th Avenue
     New York, New York  10036           tel:  (212) 279-4275
     
     Consulate General of the People's Republic of China
     Consular Section
     3417 Montrose Blvd
     Houston, TX  77006                  tel:  (713) 524-0780
     
     
     IDENTIFYING A CHILD:
     
        The CAO will then forward the file to a provincial Civil
     Affairs Bureau with instructions to locate an appropriate child
     for adoption.
     
        Once a child is identified, the CAO will send a letter of
     introduction about the child, photographs and a health record 
     of the child through the U.S. adoption agency to the
     prospective adoptive parent(s).  Questions about the child not
     answered in the material provided by the Chinese authorities
     may be relayed through your U.S. licensed adoption agency or by
     you directly to the CAO.
     
                     FINALIZING THE ADOPTION IN CHINA 
     
     Traveling to China to Complete the Process:
     
     (NOTE:  it is very important to contact the U.S. Immigration
     and Naturalization Service early in the process, before
     proceeding to China, to ensure that it will be possible to
     issue a visa to the child.)
     
     After the CAO has advised you or your U.S. adoption agency in
     writing that your application is initially accepted for
     adoption of a specified child.  You will then respond either
     directly or through your adoption agency that you are
     interested in finalizing an adoption of the specified child. 
     You will then receive a formal notice from the CAO either
     directly or through your adoption agency to proceed to China. 
     You may then proceed directly to the city in China where the
     Civil Affairs Bureau with jurisdiction over the Children's
     Welfare Institute where the child is located.  Thereafter a
     series of interviews of prospective adoptive parent(s) will
     occur, a contract will be signed with the Children's Welfare
     Institute, registered with the Civil Affairs Bureau, and
     notarial adoption decree will be issued.  
     
     Prior to traveling abroad contact the U.S. Department of State
     Citizens Emergency Center to determine whether there is an
     outstanding travel advisory and review the current consular
     information sheet concerning conditions in China.
     
     Meeting the Child:  A Note About Medical Concerns
     
     Prospective adoptive parents may request to see the child
     before completing the adoption.  This may or may not be
     possible under Chinese procedures.  Any remaining questions
     concerning the child's state of health or personal background
     after seeing the child should be addressed before completing
     the adoption.  Prospective adoptive parents may wish to have
     the child examined by a physician on the U.S. Embassy or
     Consulate's list of physicians before finalizing the adoption. 
     It will probably not be possible under Chinese procedures for
     the prospective adoptive parents to take the child to a
     hospital in a city distant from the child's location for
     examination.  Before the adoption is finalized, the prospective
     adoptive parents have no legal custody or guardianship of the
     child, and thus may not be allowed by Chinese authorities to
     take the child anywhere.

     What is the Process Before the Children's Welfare Institute and
     the Provincial Notarial Office Like?
     
     The Interview(s)
     
     Americans adopting in China commonly meet with a notary in the
     provincial capital for an informal interview.  A translator 
     supplied by the Child Welfare Institute is usually present. 
     Meetings are held in the notary's office, while seated in
     chairs or on a couch, not in a courtroom like setting.  The
     notary is dressed in typical Chinese business attire - white 
     shirt and dark slacks.  Common questions asked of the
     prospective adoptive parent(s) include:  Why are you adopting a
     Chinese child?  Do you have any children now (either adopted or
     natural)?  What is your family background?  Why do you not have
     children?  How can you assure us that the adopted child will be
     well treated?
     
     In some cases a second interview at a registry office, also
     informal, is conducted.   Sometimes the prospective adoptive
     parent(s) are asked to write a paragraph or a page on the
     reasons for the adoption and their plans for the child.
     
     The local notary, in the city where the Children's Welfare
     Institute is located, at times meeting the parent(s) at the
     Welfare Institute, conducts a final interview in which
     questions similar to those posed at the provincial level are
     asked.  Notaries meeting prospective adoptive parent(s) outside
     the notarial offices may wear a blue uniform and conduct a very
     business-like enquiry.  Otherwise, the interviews appear
     relaxed and pro-forma.  Parents recently going through the
     process were told that Beijing approval had been sought and
     obtained for their adoptions, in accordance with the procedures
     of the CAO.
     
     Applying for the Chinese Passport for the Child:
     
     Welfare Institute officials apply for the child's passport and
     exit permit in the provincial capital.  The adopting parent(s)
     rarely have had to take care of the paperwork or visit the
     Ministry of Justice offices in this regard.  For a stated fee,
     the local Public Security Bureau will normally expedite Chinese
     passport issuance.
     
     Signing the Adoption Contract:
     
     After all the interviews, the actual adoption and completion of
     the contract (including making of the fixed "donation" to the
     Children's Welfare Institute) take place.
     
     Prospective adoptive parents will be requested to sign an
     adoption agreement/contract with the Welfare Institute, then 
     register the adoption at the provincial Civil Affairs Bureau,
     pay requisite Chinese fees and obtain a Chinese passport and
     exit permit for the child.  
     
     The adoption process includes signing an agreement with the
     person or institution putting up the child for adoption,
     registering in person with the Chinese Civil Affairs Bureau and
     carrying out the notarial procedures at the designated Chinese 
     notarial office.  When the Notarial Office in the child's place
     of residence approves the adoption, that office issues a
     notarial certificate of adoption, a notarial birth certificate
     and either notarial death certificate(s) for the child's
     parent(s) or a statement of abandonment from the Welfare
     Institute.  The adoptive relationship goes into effect on the 
     day of the notarization.  
     
     Problems:  Relinquishment of an Adopted Child After an Adoption
     is Final
     
     Once an adoption is final, the adoptive parents are responsible
     for the child.  If the adoptive parents change their minds
     about the adoption after it is final, but before removing the
     child from China, the child may no longer be considered an
     orphan by Chinese authorities.  As such, the child may not be
     eligible for medical service or educational benefits in China
     unless the adoptive parents formally notify the CAO that they
     are relinquishing the child in a notarized statement,
     authenticated by the Chinese Embassy or consulate in the United
     States.  It should also be noted that such action may impede
     future adoption in China by the particular adoptive parents.
     
     Obtaining Translations and Extra Copies of Documents:
     
     Three notarial documents, in English and Chinese should be 
     obtained by adopting parents before they come to the American 
     Consulate General in Guangzhou:  (a) birth certificate; (b)
     statement of abandonment/circumstances under which the child
     was delivered to the welfare institute; and (c) the adoption
     decree.  As previously stated, these documents should be
     translated into English for U.S. immigration purposes.  The
     Notarial Office will normally translate documents, but will
     usually charge an additional fee for the service.  It is
     advisable for adoptive parent(s) to obtain any additional
     copies for their own personal records at this time, since it
     may be cumbersome to obtain certified copies at a later date. 
     To avoid problems, lengthy delays and possible non-approval of
     the U.S. I-600 immigrant visa petition, adopting parents should
     ensure this certificate and any other required documentation
     (such as death certificates if one or both of the child's
     parents are dead) has been issued by the Notarial Office.
     
     
     Proof of Abandonment of Infant Under Six Months Old:
     
     It should be noted that internal guidelines of the Civil
     Affairs Bureau provide if an infant is under age six months and
     has been abandoned to a Children's Welfare Institute, the
     Ministry  reportedly requires that the child remain in the
     Institute for two months while a thorough search is carried out
     for the natural parents.  If no one is found within two months,
     then the child may be released for adoption.
     
     CHINESE FEES:
     
     Fees charged by Chinese authorities in connection with foreign
     adoptions may vary widely.  There are of course standard fees
     for authentication/legalization of documents by the Chinese 
     Embassy or Consulate in the United States ($10.00 per document
     (a document may be a single page or multipaged, the fee is for
     authentication of the seal)); fees for the issuance by the
     Civil Affairs Bureau of the registration of the adoption (U.S.
     $130.00); fees for issuance of the Chinese notarial certificate
     approving the adoption (this fee varies on a case by case
     basis.  In addition to the fee for the adoption itself, there
     are fees for death certificates and for any investigation the
     Notarial Office may conduct to verify the child's status and
     eligibility for adoption) and fees for the Chinese passport
     (100 FEC for normal 10 day issuance.  An additional fee of 100
     FEC is charged for expedited issuance).  After consultation
     with local price control administration authorities and local
     financial departments, individual Children's Welfare Institutes
     may charge from U.S. $3000 to $5000 as a combined donation to
     the institution and a fee for having raised and cared for the
     child prior to the adoption.  Fees are handled by local
     officials outside of the Children's Welfare Institute and are
     largely based on real expenses in raising and caring for the
     child while in the Institute.  The American Consulate General
     at Guangzhou advises that extra charges of up to $500 for
     transportation or expedited processing of documents have also
     been reported.  Adoptive parents should keep the U.S. Embassy
     and Consulate General apprised of any exorbitant fees.
     
     ADOPTIONS NOT IN FULL COMPLIANCE WITH CHINESE LAW:
     
     Several Children's Welfare Institutes, contrary to the
     requirements of the new law, have also applied a looser
     definition of orphan to include any child who happened to
     reside within a Welfare Institute and have released abandoned
     children to adoptive parent(s) who only qualified to adopt
     orphans or handicapped children (that is, persons who were
     under age 35, who were not childless or who had already adopted
     or wished to adopt more than one child).  The families who
     received such children from a Welfare Institute or other source 
     were confronted with the realization that Chinese authorities
     could not approve the adoptions since they did not comply with
     Chinese law.  In order to avoid such difficulties and to ensure
     that an adoption goes smoothly, adoptive parent(s) who are
     under 35 or who already have a child/children (either a natural
     child or an adopted child) and are not adopting a handicapped
     child must be prepared for the problems which predictably will
     confront them.  Even if a local notarial adoption decree is
     issued for an adoption not in full compliance with Chinese law,
     the CAO advises that such adoptions are not valid and should be
     reported to the CAO for review and investigation.  As
     previously noted, effective October 1, 1992, adoptions not
     clearly approvable for a U.S. immigrant visa will be referred
     by the U.S. Consulate General in Guangzhou to the U.S.
     Immigration and Naturalization Service in Hong Kong for
     review.  This may in some instances lead to denial or delay in
     approval of the I-600 and issuance of the U.S. visa.  
     
                       U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS
     
     Orphans adopted abroad who have been in the custody of the
     adoptive parents less than two years require orphan petitions
     for U.S. immigrant visa processing to enter the United States.
     
     Get Started Early With U.S. Immigration Procedure:
     
     Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that certain very
     time consuming processes will have to be completed before the
     required U.S. Immigration petition (either the preliminary
     I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition
     or the final I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate
     Relative) can be approved.  These include, but are not limited
     to satisfactory completion and submission to INS of a home 
     study of the adopting parent(s), compliance with any state
     pre-adoption conditions and a fingerprint check by the FBI of
     those parent(s).  After the I-600A application is processed
     favorably, INS will issue a Form I-171H, Notice of Favorable
     Determination Concerning Application for Advanced Processing of 
     Orphan Petition.  If no I-600A is filed, when the I-600
     petition is approved by INS, INS will issue Form I-171, Notice
     of Approval of Relative Immigrant Visa Petition.  It is
     therefore suggested that prospective adopting parents get in
     touch with the INS office having jurisdiction over their place 
     or residence in the U.S. at the earliest opportunity prior to
     initiating an adoption application with the CAO or traveling to
     China.
     
     Understanding the Process:
     
     Unconditional Abandonment and Meeting the Definition of Orphan:
     
     U.S. law provides for the immigration of orphans adopted 
     overseas by Americans under section 101(B)(1)(F) of the
     Immigration and Nationality Act.  
     
     Definition of Orphan Under U.S. INA:  Under U.S. immigration
     law, the definition of orphan is broader than the common
     definition.  A foreign child may be considered an orphan for
     the purposes of U.S. immigration law if his/her parents have
     died or disappeared; if they have unconditionally abandoned or
     deserted him/her; or if he/she is separated or lost from them. 
     Normally, abandonment involves permanent placement of the child
     in an orphanage.  The law states that an eligible child must be
     under the age of sixteen at the time the immigrant visa
     petition is filed.  A child with two living parents can meet
     the definition of an orphan only through the disappearance of,
     abandonment or desertion by or separation or loss from both
     parents.  
     
     Unconditional Abandonment:   As noted above, abandonment of a
     child must be unconditional.  Agreeing to give a child up for
     adoption by a specific person does not constitute unconditional
     abandonment, since the parents are giving up custody with the
     understanding that the child will be cared for and will be 
     adopted by a particular individual, and thus continue to
     maintain some degree of parental control over the child.
     
     The Board of Immigration Appeals of the U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service (INS) has ruled that a child with one 
     surviving parent who has not been abandoned may qualify for
     orphan status only if the sole surviving parent is destitute
     by local standards or is otherwise physically or mentally 
     unable to care for the child.  This means that the child
     may not be classified as an orphan unless the sole or surviving
     parent cannot provide the child the nourishment and shelter
     necessary for subsistence consistent with the local standards
     of the child's place of residence.  The parent must also
     irrevocably release the child for emigration and adoption and
     must not continue to maintain contact with the child.  In cases
     of this kind, INS usually requires consular officers to
     investigate the parent's inability to care for the child.  
     
     WORKING WITH THE U.S. CONSULATE ON THE VISA
     
     Consular Authority to Approve a Case:
     
     Under the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), consular
     officers can only adjudicate clearly approvable I-600
     petitions.  Cases involving relinquishment of parental rights 
     by a sole or surviving parent are not considered to be clearly
     approvable in China and all such cases must be referred to INS
     for adjudication.  If there are any questions regarding the
     eligibility for orphan status or whether petition conditions 
     have been met, consular officers must refer these petitions to
     the nearest INS office, in Hong Kong.  When an orphan petition
     (I-600) is sent to an American embassy or consulate for
     possible issuance of an immigrant visa (Form OF-230) to the
     child or when an orphan petition is filed at an American
     embassy or consulate, a consular officer does an overseas
     orphan investigation as part of the normal processing.  This is
     usually done very quickly.  However, the investigation and visa
     processing can sometimes be lengthy, especially when adoptive
     parents employ irregular practices to adopt a child, making the
     petition "not clearly approvable".  INS Form I-604, Request for
     and Report on Overseas Orphan Investigation is used by INS and
     consular officers.
     
     Filing the I-600 Petition - Taking the Child to the U.S.:
     
     When the Chinese notarial formalities are completed, the INS
     Petition to Classify an Orphan as an Immediate Relative (I-600)
     may be filed for the child at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing or
     any one of the U.S. Consulates General for forwarding to the
     Consulate General in Guangzhou, or any INS office.  While all
     U.S. Foreign Service posts in China may adjudicate I-600 forms,
     it is advisable to do so in Guangzhou.  It is generally much
     faster for those adopting parents who wish to return to the
     U.S. immediately with the child to file the petition at the
     Consulate General in Guangzhou.  Since all immigrant visas in
     China are issued at Consulate General in Guangzhou, petitions
     filed at other posts will be sent to Guangzhou.  If the
     petition if filed at the Embassy or a Consulate General in 
     China, the petitioner (or at least one of the members of a
     married adoptive couple) and the child must be physically
     present in the consular district.  The I-600 is filed by one
     person, but if the petitioner is married, the petitioner's 
     spouse must also sign the petition.  Both parties must sign the 
     I-600 after the child has been identified.  This means that if
     one party has already gone abroad to arrange the adoption, the
     I-600 must be sent by the spouse abroad to the spouse in the
     United States (generally by express courier) with the child's
     identity information completed.  The original signature of both
     spouses must appear, reflecting their informed concurrence in 
     the process.  If the petitioner is married and his or her
     spouse has not seen the child before or during the adoption
     proceedings, then the child must be readopted in the U.S.  To
     do this, the petitioner must show he or she has met state
     pre-adoption requirements.  INS makes this determination at the
     time the I-600A is filed or it must be established that
     pre-adoption requirements have been met at the time of filing
     the I-600 at the embassy or consulate.
     
     If the INS has already approved an I-600A advanced processing
     petition, the I-600 petition may be filed and adjudicated at
     the embassy or consulate to which the I-600A was sent.  If 
     advanced approval has not yet been granted, the I-600 petition 
     must be forwarded to the INS for adjudication.  If so, as noted
     above, a home study and fingerprinting of parent(s) and any
     state preadoption requirements will be necessary, perhaps
     requiring several months to complete.
     
     Scheduling Appointment With U.S. Consular Officer:
     
     It is advisable to contact the U.S. Consulate General in
     Guangzhou at least three working days in advance to check that
     the documents are in order and to set an appointment for the
     immigrant visa interview.  The adoptive parent(s) should not
     contact the U.S. Consulate General to arrange an appointment
     for the U.S. visa interview until they are nearing the end of
     or have completed the adoption process in China.  These
     interviews are scheduled beginning at 9:00 a.m. Mondays through
     Fridays.  A parent or parents proceeding to China to complete
     the adoption process should plan on at least four days in
     Guangzhou to allow the U.S. Consulate General there to process
     the immigrant visa for the child.  The increasing number of
     families have made it difficult to obtain same-day interview
     and visa issuance.  The Consulate General cannot guarantee
     issuance of the visa in advance of the interview.
     
     What Documents to Bring With You to U.S. Consulate:
     
     For the immigrant visa application the child will need a valid
     PRC passport and exit permit, a medical examination, two 1 3/4
     inch color visa photos, and the Chinese notarial
     documentation.  The child must be present at the Consulate
     General in Guangzhou for the immigrant visa application
     process.  The medical examination must be performed by a
     physician from an approved list of physicians using a specified
     form provided by the American Embassy or Consulate.  The
     medical examination can be performed in Beijing, Shanghai,
     Guangzhou or Taishan.  The most convenient site for medical
     examinations in Guangzhou is the Guangzhou Health and
     Quarantine Service, a modest walk from the Consulate at 33
     Shamian North Road, telephone:  888-9513).  This facility is
     open for medical exams from 8 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. -
     3:30 p.m. every day, except Chinese New Year - January 23 in 
     1993).  Unless special circumstances, such as a physical
     handicap, indicate the child's care will be particularly 
     costly, the adopting parents will not be required to provide
     further proof of their financial situation, as this information
     will have already been provided at the time of petition (I-600A
     or I-600) approval.
     
     Note  About Additional Documentation Requirements:  Since each
     case is different, it is possible that the Embassy or Consulate
     will request additional documents after a preliminary review of
     the application of the prospective adoptive parent(s).  For
     example, if the minor has a physical or mental disability and
     only one adoptive parent (in the case of married couples) is 
     present in China, a notarized statement will be required from
     the absent prospective adoptive parent in the United States
     indicating that they are fully aware of the physical or mental
     disability of the minor and in spite of that fact that they
     have the intention of finalizing the adoption.  This statement
     can be included in item 19 of form I-600 and also in the home
     study if more convenient.  In that case a separate notarized
     statement will not be required.
     
     Married Couples:  When Both Spouses Have Not Seen The Child: 
     In cases where the minor has not been seen or observed in
     person by both prospective adoptive parents (in the case of
     married couples), a notarized statement by the absent parent 
     will be required indicating that although they have not seen or
     observed the minor in person, they are nevertheless willing to
     adopt or re-adopt the minor in the United States.  In the case 
     of a minor taken to the United States by a third party, for
     example a legal representative or social assistant of an
     adoption agency or other entity, a notarized statement will be
     required authorizing that person to take the minor the United
     States with the purpose of placing him/her with the prospective
     adoptive parent(s).  However, this procedure may not be
     acceptable to Chinese authorities.  See note below.  This
     statement can also be included in the local authority's
     authorization for the child to leave China.  Consequently, even
     if an agent is physically accompanying the child to the U.S.,
     the petition itself must be signed by the adoptive parent(s),
     after the child has been identified.
     

     NOTE ABOUT POWERS OF ATTORNEY:  There are no provisions in   
     INS regulations for approving petitions signed by agents with
     powers of attorney.  Moreover, since Chinese authorities     
     require that at least one prospective adoptive parent come to
     China, it is not clear whether it would ever be acceptable to
     Chinese authorities for a third party to take the child out  
     of the country (for example in the case of sudden illness of 
     the prospective adoptive parent in China requiring departure 
     or evacuation before the adoption is finalized.  Several     
     adoption agencies doing business in China have told their    
     clients that a power of attorney is sufficient for filing of 
     an I 600 petition; in other cases the spouse has signed the  
     petition before the identity of the child is known and       
     complete.  In all such cases the U.S. Consulate General in   
     Guangzhou could not approve the immigrant visa petition due  
     to these errors made by adopting parents on mistaken advice  
     from U.S. adoption agencies.


     U.S. IMMIGRATION CHECKLIST
     
     The Immigration and Naturalization Service pamphlet entitled 
     
     "The Immigration of Adopted and Prospective Adoptive Children" 
     (M-249Y, Revised, 1990) includes a checklist on orphan petition 
     procedures.  That checklist is annexed to this information
     flyer for the convenience of prospective adoptive parents to
     help in tracking the immigration requirements.  
     
     U.S. FEES:
     
     INS Fees for I-600 and I-600A Petitions:  There is an INS fee
     of $140.00 for an I-600 or I-600A petition.  If you have a 
     valid I-600A and file an I-600 within one year of the approval
     of the I-600A, no fee will be charged for the I-600 provided
     you are only petitioning for one child or for siblings.  If you 
     have a valid I-600A and within one year of approval of the 
     I-600A are petitioning for more than one child and the children
     are not siblings, the I-600 fee will be charged for each child 
     after the first child except for the first child.
     
     U.S. State Department authentication fee:  If you are having
     documents authenticated by the Department of State
     Authentication Office, there is a fee of $4.00 per document.
     
     Medical Examination Fee:
     
     The adopted child must have a medical examination performed by
     one of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate's panel physicians before
     the immigrant visa can be issued.  The cost of this medical
     examination is approximately U.S. $12.00 and must be borne by
     the adoptive parent(s).
     
     U.S. Immigrant Visa Fee:  The fee for the immigrant visa is
     $200.00 and may be paid either in U.S. dollars, Foreign
     Exchange Certificates (FEC) or Renminbi.  This $200.00 does not
     include medical examinations, costs of documents, the petition, 
     etc.  The American Consulate does not accept personal checks or
     credit cards.
     
     Authentication of Documents by U.S. Embassy or Consulates:  If
     you are having documents authenticated by a consular officer at
     a U.S. embassy or consulate, there is a fee of $10.00 per
     document.
     
     ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
     
     Prospective adopting parents should consult INS publication No. 
     M-249, "The Immigration of Adopted and Prospective Adoptive
     Children" and the Department of State information flyer 
     "International Adoptions".  The State Department flyer is
     available by contacting the Office of Citizens Consular
     Services or by using our autofax system.  To access the autofax
     system, use the phone on your fax machine and dial (202)
     647-3000 using the keys on the fax phone, not the fax keyboard
     itself.  Follow the prompts and request document 1023,
     International Adoptions.  
     
               AMERICAN EMBASSY/CONSULATE GENERAL ASSISTANCE
     
     Upon arrival in China, prospective adoptive parent(s) should
     register at the Consular Section, American Citizens Services
     Section of the American Embassy or Consulate General.  The
     Embassy/Consulate General will be able to provide information
     about any outstanding travel advisories, any recent changes in 
     adoption procedures and to provide other information about
     China including lists of physicians, attorneys, interpreters
     and translators.
     
     ADDRESSES OF U.S. EMBASSY AND CONSULATES IN CHINA
     
     Street Address                    Mailing Address
     
     U.S. Embassy                      U.S. Embassy Beijing
     American Citizen Services         American Citizen Services
     2 Xiu Shui Dong Jie               PSC 461, Box 50
     Beijing 100600, PRC               FPO AP 96521-0002
     
     tel:  (86)(1) 532-3831 ext. 229   fax:  (86)(1) 532-2483
     
     
     U.S. Consulate General       U.S. Consulate General Guangzhou
     American Citizen Services    American Citizen Services
     1 South Shamian Street       PSC 461, Box 100
     Shamian Island               FPO AP 96521-0002
     Guangzhou 20031, PRC
     
     tel:  (86)(20) 888-2222      fax:  (86)(20) 886-2341
     
     U.S. Consulate General       U.S. Consulate General Shanghai
     American Citizen Services    American Citizen Services
     1469 Huai Hai Middle Road    PSC 461, Box 200
     Shanghai,       PRC          FPO AP 96521-0002
     
     tel:  (86)(21) 433-6880      fax:  (86)(21) 433-4122
     
     U.S. Consulate General       U.S. Consulate General Shenyang
     American Citizen Services    American Citizen Services
     40 Lane 4, Section 5         PSC 461, Box 45
     Sanjing Street               FPO AP 96521-0002
     Shenyang, 
     Heping District, PRC
     
     tel:  (86)(24) 220-000       fax:  (86)(24) 220-074
     
     U.S. Consulate General       U.S. Consulate General Chengdu
     American Citizen Services    American Citizen Services
     Jinjiang Hotel               PSC 461, Box 85
     180 Renmin Road              FPO AP 96521-0002
     Chengdu, Sichuan, PRC
     
     tel:  (86)(28) 58222, ext. 131  fax:  (86)(28) 583-520, 583-792
     
     HOTELS IN GUANGZHOU, CHINA
     
     U.S. citizens traveling to China to complete adoptions will
     ultimately have to stay over a brief period of time in
     Guangzhou for the U.S. immigrant visa process.  Several U.S.
     citizens interested in adoption in China have asked questions
     concerning inexpensive housing, both in the city where the
     child is located and in Guangzhou.  Your adoption agency or
     travel agent may be in the best position to assist you in this
     regard.
     
     Hotel costs in China vary.  Beijing, for example, has several
     classes of hotels -- 5 star very expensive; middle range
     Western style hotels ($90 - $120 per night); middle range
     Chinese hotels ($50-$70) and inexpensive Chinese hotels. 
     Several middle range western-style hotels have offered
     discounts to adoption agencies if they agree to send their
     adoptive families there -- as much as a $40 a day discount. 
     Inexpensive Chinese style hotels may not include amenities
     which an American might consider essential.  Other inexpensive
     housing accommodations (other than hotels) may likewise be very
     different from what most Americans may be accustomed to, and
     therefore you may not find them suitable for your needs,
     especially with a new baby or toddler.
     
     There are a number of suitable hotels where you can stay in
     Guangzhou.  The following three hotels are all located on
     Shamian Island within walking distance of the U.S. Consulate
     General.  The Department of State and the Consulate do not
     assume any responsibility for the quality of service provided
     and do not specifically recommend any particular hotel.  
     The daily rates for double rooms as of October 8, 1992 are
     provided below:
     
     --White Swan Hotel                --Victory Hotel
     1 Shamian South Street              54 Shamian Main Street
     Tel.:  888-6968                     Tel.:  886-2622
     $100 plus 20%                       FEC 138-175, including
     service/subway charge.              service.
     During Trade Fair:                  During Trade Fair:
     $200 plus 20%                       FEC 228-287, plus 15% 
     service/subway charge.              service charge.
     

     --Pearl Hotel
     50 Shamian South Street
     Tel.:  888-9238
     FEC 133-177 
     During Trade Fair: 30% higher
     
     
     WHAT TO BRING FOR YOUR NEW BABY
     
     Since it is difficult to predict how long it may be necessary
     for you to remain in China with your adopted child, you may
     want to consider what articles you might want to bring with
     you.  There are small grocery and sundry stores in major hotels
     in China.  Nevertheless, you should be aware that not all
     western style baby products are readily available in China. 
     You may wish to consider bringing certain items with you.  
     
     These might include:
     
         - Plastic or cloth baby carrier
         - Bottle nipples 
         - Disposable paper diapers 
         - Baby wipes
         - Baby blankets 
         - Infant wear 
         - Thermos bottle, for hot water to prepare dry formula 
          -Milk bottles (plastic, glass, and disposable) 
         - Disposable plastic bags for milk bottles 
     
     DOCTORS:  The U.S. Embassy in Beijing and the Consulates
     General all maintain current lists of doctors and sources for
     some western medicines, should either you or your child
     encounter health problems while still in China.
     
     INTERPRETERS/TRANSLATORS:  Children's Welfare Institutes have
     English translators available.  Major hotels in China should
     also be able to assist with interpreter/translation services.
     
     GROUND TRANSPORTATION TO CHILDREN'S WELFARE INSTITUTES:  Major
     hotels in China should be able to assist with ground
     transportation in the form of a driver or taxi service.  It is 
     prudent to check about fees in advance, rather than at the end
     of the journey.
     
     HONG KONG TRANSIT VISAS FOR CHINESE ADOPTED CHILDREN:
     
     Due to the proximity and number of flights, return travel to
     the United States is commonly arranged by Americans adopting
     Chinese children via Hong Kong.  Hong Kong Immigration advises
     that transit visas are available at both the airport and the
     railroad station.  The Consulate General in Guangzhou 
     encourages adopting parent(s) to book either direct flights
     from Shanghai or connecting flights at Hong Kong airport
     (without the need to enter Hong Kong), rather than proceeding
     from Guangzhou to Hong Kong by ground transportation.  If
     adoptive parent(s) do opt to enter Hong Kong, they should be
     aware of the difficulty involved in obtaining Hong Kong transit
     visas for Chinese adopted children.  U.S. passport holders do
     not need Hong Kong visas to enter Hong Kong.  However, the
     adopted children, who bear Chinese passports are required to
     have Hong Kong visas.  The only place at which transit visas
     are issued (according to the Hong Kong Government Security
     Secretariat) is at the Lo Wu train terminal.  From Guangzhou,
     this is reached by taking a two hour train to Shenzhen and
     walking across the border to Lo Wu.  The American Consulate
     General in Hong Kong has discussed this problem with Hong Kong
     Immigration authorities.  As a result of these discussions, the
     Hong Kong Immigration Department has offered to help facilitate
     the movement of the children at the Lo Wu entry control point.  
     
     The American Consulate General in Guangzhou can assist adoptive
     parent(s) who opt to travel through Hong Kong by notifying the
     Chief Immigration Officer at the Lo Wu terminal via fax no.
     673-2000 prior to the arrival of the adopted children at Lo Wu.
     
     This being said, however, there follows an explanation of the
     difficulties of traveling this route.  While contact between
     the U.S. Consulate General in Guangzhou and the Hong Kong
     Immigration Officer at Lo Wu should decrease the waiting time,
     the procedure remains somewhat cumbersome and tiring for
     parents and children.
     
     Walking Through Process:  After reaching Shenzhen, you must
     walk through the station tunnel to the exit point, a 15-20
     minute walk, depending on the number of persons exiting and the
     weight of luggage being carried.  From the arrival at Shenzhen
     station to the walk across the bridge to Lo Wu takes 30-45
     minutes.  Lines for the escalator to the upper emigration 
     floors take about 8 minutes.  Foreigners exit on the second
     floor, while Chinese continue up to the third floor.  The 
     child's exit form is not the same as the one used by U.S.
     citizens.  A Chinese language "first time exiting" form is
     available at a desk just to the left as one goes into the
     emigration area.  Workers there can assist in filling out the
     form.  The child's U.S. immigrant visa and the adoption
     certificate are requested for inspection.  Obtaining a transit
     visa for Hong Kong takes at least two hours.  After it is 
     obtained, you cross the bridge from Zhenzhen to Hong Kong.  The
     Immigration Section for those needing a transit visa (stay up
     to one week) is up the left hand escalator, behind white metal 
     railings, just before the main lines for immigration 
     inspection.  The initial visa application is made at the 
     smaller of the two windows, arrived at by lining up between
     blue metal railings.  The child's PRC passport, airplane
     ticket, and U.S. immigrant visa is inspected.  The transit visa
     application is a one page form, with a few queries in English
     on the back, and the remainder in Chinese, which the Hong Kong
     Immigration Inspectors assist in completing.  A wait of one and
     one half hours on wooden benches in the large waiting hall is
     followed by the child's name being called, at the larger window
     in front of the waiting hall. A sixty Hong Kong dollars visa
     fee is collected and the child's passport is stamped with a
     transit visa.  Accompanying U.S. passport holders will also get
     the Hong Kong entry stamps placed in their passports at this
     time.  Exiting from the waiting room, one follows white metal
     railings along the left end of the Lo Wu terminal, and reaches
     an immigration inspector who checks all passports.  Customs and
     train tickets are at the right end of the terminal.  Trains to
     Kowloon run from the lower floor of the Lo Wu terminal. 
     Tickets on the Hong Kong railway are twenty five Hong Kong
     dollars to Kowloon Hong Hom station at the end of the line. 
     Taxis are available at that terminus after a short queue.  You
     may wish to make hotel arrangements in advance.
     
     PROBLEMS:  Specific problems with adoption in China may be
     addressed to the Consular Section of the American
     Embassy/Consulate.  You may also contact the Department of
     State, Office of Children's Issues, Room 4811 N.S., 2201 C
     Street N.W., Washington, D.C.  20520-4818, tel:  (202) 647-2688
     with questions about international adoption (not related to the
     issuance of U.S. visas).  This office can also provide you with
     a copy of the Department of State's general information flyer
     on International Adoption which explains some of the problems
     and pitfalls common in adoption cases.  Recorded information
     about significant changes in adoption procedures may be
     monitored by calling (202) 736-7000.  If China is not included
     in the country specific recordings, then procedures have not
     changed significantly.  Information about any outstanding
     travel warnings can be obtained from the Department of State,
     Office of American Citizens Services.  You may listen to the
     travel advisories by calling (202) 647-5225.  If you would like
     copies of any travel warnings you may call the Office of
     American Citizens Services at (202) 647-5226.  Copies are also
     available at the 13 regional U.S. passport agencies.  Copies of
     Consular Information Sheets for China detailing specific
     conditions which do not require a travel warning may be
     obtained through the Office of American Citizens Services. 
     Consular Information sheets are also available through our
     automated fax service at (202) 647-3000 by using the telephone
     on your fax machine (using the keyboard on the fax phone, not
     the fax machine itself to dial).  Follow the prompts and select
     the information you desire.  You may also wish to obtain a copy
     of the information brochure "Tips for Travelers to China" a booklet 
     available directly from the Citizens Emergency Center.
     
     VISA QUESTIONS:  For questions about U.S. visa petition
     procedures, contact the nearest office of the U.S. Immigration
     and Naturalization Service, located in the Federal Government
     section of your telephone book.  General recorded information 
     about visa procedures is also available from the Department of 
     State's Visa Office at (202) 663-1225.  After listening to
     prompts and selecting the recorded topics, the automated
     telephone system will connect you to the Visa Office telephone 
     inquiries section where an officer will be available to answer
     questions not addressed in the recorded material.
     
     Visa Petition Referred to INS Hong Kong:  If you are in China
     and the immigrant visa petition has been referred by the U.S.
     Consulate General in Guangzhou to the U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service office in Hong Kong for review, contact
     INS Hong Kong for additional information.  You can reach that
     office by calling or writing to U.S. Immigration and
     Naturalization Service, American Consulate General, 26 Garden
     Rd., PSC 464, Box 30, Hong Kong;  tel:  011-852-523-9011; fax
     011-852-845-1598.  If you are writing from the United States, 
     letters regarding the status of INS reviews should be addressed
     to U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, American
     Consulate General Hong Kong, FPO AP 96522-0002.  
     
     Applying for U.S. Citizenship for an Adopted Child:
     
     Questions about naturalization of an adopted child as a U.S.
     citizen after the child has entered the United States should be
     addressed to the INS office with jurisdiction over the adoptive
     parent(s)' place of residence.  The process requires that INS
     Form N-643 Application for Certificate of Citizenship in behalf
     on an Adopted Child, be filed with the INS before the child is
     18 years of age.
     
     CONCLUSION:  Interested Americans should be aware that the
     process of adopting a child in the PRC and bringing the child
     to the U.S. may be time-consuming and difficult.  The American
     Embassy and Consulates General and the Department of State
     stand ready to assist adoptive parents, within the limits of
     our authority.  Because no private agencies exist in China to 
     assist interested foreigners, U.S. citizens arriving in China
     to finalize an adoption are advised to proceed carefully with
     all PRC legal procedures.  They should also work closely with
     the nearest U.S. mission in China throughout the adoption
     process to ensure that the child selected will qualify for U.S.
     immigration benefits and that all the necessary PRC civil
     documents are in order.  Any feedback adoptive parents are 
     willing and able to provide about their experiences while
     trying to adopt children from China would be very helpful to us
     in ensuring the validity and usefulness of the information in
     this and similar brochures.  Please contact the Office of
     Citizens Consular Services with ideas about how we can try to
     make the experience easier (if possible) or at least easier to
     understand. 
     
     ADDENDA
     
         INS Checklist
         Text of Chinese Adoption Law
         Text of Chinese Adoption Regulations
         Map of China (Consular Districts)
         List of U.S. Consular Districts in China
     
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