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THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
( Sea Island, Georgia )
For Immediate Release
June 9, 2004

FACT SHEET: G8 ACTION PLAN ON NONPROLIFERATION

“Every civilized nation has a stake in preventing the spread of weapons of mass destruction. These materials and technologies, and the people who traffic them, cross many borders. To stop this trade, the nations of the world must be strong and determined. We must work together, we must act effectively.”

President George W. Bush
February 11, 2004
National Defense University
Washington, D.C.

Presidential Action

President Bush and the G-8 Leaders agreed today to take new actions to counter the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction which, together with international terrorism, constitutes the preeminent threat to global peace and security.  

G-8 Action: The G-8 Leaders adopted today an Action Plan on Nonproliferation that advances an ambitious global nonproliferation agenda, and furthers the proposals contained in President Bush's February 11, 2004 speech at the National Defense University. The G-8 Leaders committed to:

  • Expand the work of the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI), which now includes all G-8 members, to disrupt and dismantle proliferation networks, such as that of A.Q. Khan, and coordinate enforcement efforts;
  • Refrain for one year from initiating new transfers of enrichment and reprocessing equipment and technology to additional states, while working to implement permanent controls before the 2005 G-8 Summit to keep this equipment from terrorists or states seeking to use it to manufacture nuclear weapons.
  • Support full implementation of the U.N. Security Council Resolution 1540 to criminalize proliferation activities, establish effective export controls, and protect proliferation-sensitive materials. The resolution was proposed by President Bush in September 2003, and passed unanimously in April 2004.

•  Strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency by:

  • Supporting universal adoption of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Additional Protocol, which expands the IAEA's tools to verify nuclear activity, and making it an essential new standard for nuclear supply;
  • Establishing a new Special Committee of the IAEA Board of Governors to focus on safeguards and verification; and
  • Urging states under IAEA investigation not to participate in decisions regarding their cases.

•  Expand the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction by:

  • Welcoming Australia, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand, and the Republic of Korea as new donors;
  • Working with other former Soviet states to discuss their participation in the Global Partnership;
  • Using the Global Partnership to coordinate nonproliferation projects in Libya, Iraq, and other countries; and
  • Reaffirming the commitment to provide up to $20 billion for the Global Partnership through 2012.

•  Confront Nonproliferation Challenges

  • North Korea : the G-8 called for the complete, verifiable, and irreversible dismantlement of North Korea 's nuclear programs, and expressed support for the Six-Party Process.
  • Iran : the G-8 were united in urging Iran to comply fully with its Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty obligations and all IAEA Board requirements.
  • Libya : the G-8 welcomed Libya 's strategic decision to eliminate its WMD and longer-range missile programs.

•  Take Action Against Bioterrorism and Radiological Weapons by:

  • Expanding and improving national and international capabilities to detect, prevent, and respond to biological attacks; and
  • Strengthening export and import controls on radioactive sources that could be used to make a “dirty bomb.”

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For the full text of the Action Plan on Nonproliferation, please click here.

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