U.S. Department of State 
______________________________________________________
The State Department does not guarantee the authenticity of 
documents on the Internet.  If for legal or other reasons you 
require the original version of a document in hard copy, 
please contact the Office of Public Communication, Bureau of 
Public Affairs.

Note that State Department information is not copyrighted 
unless indicated and can be reproduced without consent.  
Citation of source is appreciated.  Permission to reproduce 
any copyrighted material (including photos or graphics) must 
be obtained from the original source. 
______________________________________________________



US DEPARTMENT OF STATE DISPATCH
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 36, SEPTEMBER 5, 1994
PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS



ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

1.  U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security Council 
Resolution 940--Acting Secretary Talbott, Deputy Secretary of 
Defense Deutch, Joint Statement, Fact Sheet 
2.  President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement  To End 
Violence in Northern Ireland  
3.  U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference--Timothy E. Wirth 
4.  Focus on Business:  1994 World Summit on Trade Efficiency  


ARTICLE 1

U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security Council 
Resolution 940
Acting Secretary Talbott, Deputy Secretary of Defense Deutch, 
Joint Statement, Fact Sheet

Acting Secretary Talbott and   Deputy Secretary Deutch
Opening remarks at a Department of State press briefing, 
Washington, DC, August 31, 1994 (introductory remarks 
deleted).

Acting Secretary Talbott.  I know there was and continues to 
be quite a bit of interest, so we thought we would take this 
opportunity to give you a report on our one-day trip to 
Jamaica for the CARICOM joint ministerial meeting and to the 
Dominican Republic to meet with the leadership there and also 
to visit the base of the multilateral observer group that is 
going to be helping the Dominicans enforce the sanctions 
along the Dominican-Haitian border.

Let me just say a word or two by way of introduction of 
Secretary Deutch.  There has been a lot in the commentary as 
well as the news articles about our Haiti policy--about 
signals and messages, and those two words appeared in a 
couple of the pieces that reported on our trip yesterday.  We 
make no bones about the fact that we are, indeed, trying to 
send a very clear signal and a very clear message, primarily 
to the leadership in Port-au-Prince, and we welcome the 
chance, quite candidly, to reinforce that signal and that 
message again today.

UN Security Council Resolution 940 authorizes the 
international community--the member states of the United 
Nations--to use all necessary means to bring about the 
departure of the dictators from Haiti and to establish the 
conditions that allow the restoration of democracy in Haiti.

What was significant about yesterday's meeting in Jamaica was 
that the CARICOM countries committed themselves as a group to 
support  Resolution 940 and, very specifically,  to the "all 
necessary means" provision.  Four of the seven member states 
of CARICOM that have military forces committed themselves to 
contribute and participate in what we are calling the 
Multinational Force, or MNF.  This would be the force that 
would go into Haiti--either under permissive or hostile 
circumstances--in order to carry out the will of the 
international community.

The four states that have committed to participate are 
Jamaica, Barbados, Belize, and Trinidad and Tobago.  The 
other three--Antigua, Bahamas, and Guyana--are involved in 
discussions with our government, and we think it is quite 
possible--indeed likely--that some of them also will 
contribute.  But the point I want to stress here is that 
CARICOM, as a group, unanimously endorsed the action in the 
next step.

Also, several of the CARICOM states that do not have military 
forces are prepared, we believe, to contribute police.  
Police will be an extremely important part of the 
international effort in Haiti after the departure of the 
dictators and the restoration of democracy.

Deputy Secretary Deutch.  My purpose here in appearing with 
Secretary Talbott--our trip yesterday was to make sure that 
everybody knew, both within our government and especially in 
Haiti, that the Defense Department and the State Department 
are together on the policy that we are following.  That is a 
very important point, and it is true in all particulars.

The second is the question of the message.  Strobe has said 
it very clearly.  The way I say it is that the Multinational 
Force is going to Haiti.  The issue is the circumstances 
under which that force enters Haiti.  It could be under a 
permissive circumstance at the request of the legitimate 
government with the authority of the UN Resolution, or it can 
be under contested circumstances if the de facto government--
the illegal government--in Haiti does not come to its senses 
and realize that the world is determined to see a change in 
that government-- back to the democratically elected 
Government of Haiti.

Our interest in this purpose is very simple.  The reason this 
message is so important is that we would like that 
intervention to take place with the minimum number of 
casualties possible, both for the Multinational Force and for 
the people of Haiti.  It is impossible to assure that there 
will be no casualties, of course, in any venture of this 
kind.  We want to stress that the intervention--the 
Multinational Force intervention--will have overwhelming 
force associated with it so as to try to minimize casualties, 
should it be needed.  But the best of all circumstances will 
be if the "de factos" leave and the legitimate Government of 
Haiti is able to come in with the Multinational Force and 
have this transition to the legitimate government as rapidly 
as possible.

The last point that I would like to make to you is that our 
planning is in place.  As Strobe has described, we will 
integrate in our training, beginning immediately at Roosevelt 
Roads in Puerto Rico, the contingents which are coming from 
the CARICOM nations and other contingents as they arrive.  
That training will include planning logistical support, 
command, control, and communications--all the things which 
are required to have an effective integrated force.  But 
planning also, importantly, includes a procedure for turning 
over the responsibilities of the Multinational Force to the 
subsequent phase of a United Nations Mission in Haiti, the 
so-called UNMIH.  So we believe that we are ready, when the 
circumstances warrant, to return the legitimate government to 
Haiti, and we will do so as promptly and as effectively as we 
can--once again, with a minimum number of casualties and 
hopefully in the absence of the de facto government in that 
country. 

Joint Statement

Text of a statement issued by CARICOM member countries and 
representatives of the U.S. Government at the conclusion of 
the meeting of CARICOM policymakers and heads of the military 
and police personnel, Kingston, Jamaica, August 30, 1994.

CARICOM countries and the United States met here today and 
agreed to coordinate their efforts in support of the 
implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 
(UNSCR) 940 designed to facilitate the departure from Haiti 
of the military leadership consistent with the Governors 
Island Agreement, the prompt return of the legitimately 
elected President and the restoration of the legitimate 
authorities of the Government of Haiti, and to establish and 
maintain a secure and stable environment that will permit 
implementation of the Governors Island Agreement.  We 
anticipate that other governments will be joining in this 
effort.

Staff officers from CARICOM countries will soon join with 
their U.S. counterparts to finalise and coordinate 
arrangements related to their participation in the 
implementation of UNSCR 940.

Argentina and the United Kingdom have also agreed to 
participate in this multinational coalition.  Argentina has 
already dispatched a staff officer to Atlantic Command 
headquarters and United Kingdom military personnel will 
assist in the training programme for the Multinational Force 
(MNF).

We were briefed by United Nations personnel attending the 
meeting on the current efforts by United Nations Secretary 
General Boutros Boutros Ghali to seek, through diplomatic 
means, to secure the peaceful implementation of this 
resolution.

Even as the MNF is established and preparations undertaken to 
participate in the United Nations Mission in Haiti (UNMIH), 
our governments are united in the hope that these latest 
efforts by the UN Secretary General will succeed.  However 
if, once again, these efforts fail, then our governments are 
equally united in their determination to take all necessary 
means to carry out the Security Council mandate to restore 
the democratic process in Haiti.

The meeting also discussed preparations for deployment of the 
UNMIH which, in accordance with UNSCR 940, will replace the 
Multinational Force once a stable and secure environment has 
been established.  Twelve nations have already expressed 
interest in participating in this operation, including many 
of us represented here today.  All of us will continue to 
work with the United Nations, and the Secretary General's 
Special Representative both with respect to the UN 
peacekeeping role and to the UNMIH.

The construction of viable democratic institutions and 
support for acceptable economic and social conditions for the 
Haitian people are tasks to which we are fully committed and 
will make every effort to achieve.  Regrettably, these cannot 
be effectively pursued until the political crisis in Haiti is 
resolved.

UNSCR 940 represents the only remaining avenue in the process 
of achieving the objectives of the Governors Island 
Agreement, all others having failed.  We remain committed to 
working for the success of that resolution.

We have just learnt that the Haitian military has rejected 
the initiative of the United Nations Secretary General.

We condemn the negative response of the Haitian military to 
this latest diplomatic initiative by the UN Secretary General 
and consider the murder of Fr. Jean-Marie Vincent, well-known 
political activist and supporter of President Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide, as one more unwelcome and painful reminder of the 
total unacceptability of the prevailing situation in Haiti 
and of the need for urgent and decisive action as set out in 
UNSCR 940. 

Fact Sheet:  Caribbean Community

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is an association of 12 
independent English-speaking countries and 1 U.K. dependency.  
It was created under the Treaty of Chaguaramas in 1973 to 
increase the economic and eventual political integration of 
these states.

Through CARICOM, Caribbean leaders aim to develop common 
political  and economic positions in order to make their 
countries a more effective regional unit.  CARICOM strongly 
supported UN Security Resolution 940 on Haiti in an August 
12, 1994, statement.  It also is concerned about the role of 
Cuba in the hemisphere and the future for the region in a 
post-Castro era. 

Divergent economic interests, however, have made it difficult 
to implement coordinated policies.   For example, CARICOM has 
faced difficulties in having its members implement the 
agreed-upon Common External Tariff.  Jamaica and Trinidad and 
Tobago are moving toward liberal trade policies, while the 
smaller countries favor protectionist policies to support 
domestic industries.

In July 1994, CARICOM created the Association of Caribbean 
States (ACS), which includes CARICOM members plus the non-
English-speaking Caribbean islands (including Cuba) and 
Central American countries as well as Mexico, Colombia, and 
Cuba) and Central American countries Venezuela.  Key issues 
such as the location of the Secretariat and funding have not 
been resolved.

In its July 1994 Heads of Government Meeting in Bridgetown, 
Barbados, CARICOM agreed to pursue a trade arrangement such 
as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  It also 
agreed that individual members could work bilaterally toward 
such an agreement with the United States.  

CARICOM members are concerned that NAFTA will divert 
investment and trade toward Mexico, particularly in the 
textile and apparel sector.   In response, the United States 
has proposed the Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program to 
give beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Initiative 
essentially the same treatment that Mexico receives under 
NAFTA on textile and apparel products.  In return, 
beneficiaries would be asked to join the World Trade 
Organization and agree to improve treatment of investment, 
intellectual property rights, worker rights, and the 
environment.  The program is designed to help countries in 
the region prepare for the obligations of closer and fully 
reciprocal trade relations with the United States.   

CARICOM
Secretary General:  Edwin Carrington  (Trinidad and Tobago)
Location of Secretariat:  Georgetown, Guyana
Members:   Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, 
Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana
Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent 
and the Grenadines,Trinidad and Tobago 

(###)



ARTICLE 2

President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement To End Violence 
in Northern Ireland

Statement by President Clinton released by the White House, 
Office of the Press Secretary, Washington, DC, August 31, 
1994.

I welcome today's watershed announcement by the IRA that it 
has decided to end the 25-year campaign of violence and 
pursue the path of peace.  While much work remains to be 
done, the IRA's decision to join the political process can 
mark the beginning of a new era that holds the promise of 
peace for all the people of Northern Ireland.

I have just spoken with Prime Minister Albert Reynolds of 
Ireland and Prime Minister John Major of the United Kingdom 
to congratulate them for their persistent efforts to bring 
this day about.  Their joint resolve to end the violence and 
pursue a negotiated settlement has been crucial to the 
progress made to date.  Their historic Joint Declaration last 
December, together with the Anglo-Irish agreement of 1985, 
have built the foundation for the new hope we have today.  I 
am pleased that the United States has been able to contribute 
to this process of reconciliation.

We join with the Governments of Ireland and the United 
Kingdom in the hope and expectation that today's step will 
help bring a lasting and just peace to Northern Ireland.  I 
urge the IRA and all who have supported it to fulfill the 
promise of today's announcement to end the use and support of 
violence, just as we continue to call on all parties who have 
sought to achieve political goals through violence to cease 
to do so.  There must be a permanent end to the violence.

The United States continues to stand ready to assist in 
advancing the process of peace in Northern Ireland.  We hope 
that both traditions--Unionist and Nationalist--will support 
the only real avenue to peace, that of a negotiated 
settlement to the conflict.  

(###)



ARTICLE 3

U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference 
Timothy E. Wirth, Under Secretary for Global Affairs

Opening remarks at a Department of State press briefing, 
Washington, DC, August 31, 1994

The goals of the United States at the Cairo Conference are 
three-fold.  In other words, we would like to come out with 
three results.

A Program of Action
First is a broad, comprehensive program of action.  The world 
is sharing in Cairo a sense of urgency about the population 
situation--a sense of urgency about the fact that we will not 
beŠable to reach economic development, maintain political 
stability, or sustain ecological structures in the world 
without population stabilization.  This is a sense of urgency 
felt by countries all over the world--East-West, North-South, 
rich-poor--and the program of action is the template that 
will come out of Cairo outlining what effective population 
stabilization programs can be.  

That program of action--product number one or outcome number 
one--of Cairo has been more than 92% agreed to.  For those of 
you who are into UN documentation, UN documents are done by 
consensus.  And going into the final negotiations, if areas 
of a document are not agreed upon, they have brackets around 
them.  Going into the Rio Conference in 1992--the Earth 
Summit on Environment--nearly 50% of the document was 
bracketed.  Going into the Human Rights Conference in the 
spring of 1993, nearly 30% of that document was bracketed.  
Less than 8% of this Cairo document is bracketed.  So there 
has been an enormous amount of work done and consensus 
reached on just about every issue.  I will come back to the 
remaining issues.

Funding
The second outcome is funding.  One of the goals of the Cairo 
Conference is to make family planning information and 
services available shortly after the turn of the century to 
every woman and family in the world who wants them.  That 
will be an expensive proposition.

Currently, spending is somewhere around $5 to $6 billion a 
year in the world on family planning.  The cost of making 
sure that family planning is available to all individuals in 
the world who wish to have it will be in the neighborhood of 
$15 billion.  So there must be an increase around the world.

The United States has begun to work very hard on that.  We 
have increased our own contribution to close to $600 million 
per year directly into family planning.  The U.S. is the 
largest contributor in the world.  We have persuaded the 
Japanese to increase their contribution from $40 million a 
year to more than $400 million a year for population and 
AIDS.  The Canadians, the Australians, the European Union, 
the British, the Nordics--have all increased their 
contributions.

The World Bank has made population the number-one agenda for 
them in 1994, and it was the lead issue that Lou Preston, the 
President of the World Bank, spoke about at the time of the 
50th anniversary of the Bretton Woods institutions.  Mr. 
Preston will be one of the opening speakers at the Cairo 
Conference.

We think we are making very significant progress on our 
second goal, which is the development of the financial 
resources necessary to provide family planning to everybody 
in the world who wants it.

Program Delivery Mechanism
The third goal is the follow-up mechanism--the delivery 
mechanism--for the program of action and the funding, and a 
very ambitious program of predominantly women-centered 
programs around the world, focused not only on family 
planning but on the full range of women's reproductive health 
care services.  Child mortality programs, the education of 
children, and the role of women in economic development are 
all part of that follow-up mechanism which is being developed 
in each country.  Some countries, such as Indonesia, Egypt, 
and Bangladesh, have very aggressive programs now.  Others 
want to learn from the successes of countries that have done 
very well.

So there are three goals in Cairo--the program of action, the 
funding, and the follow-up mechanism--and we think that we 
are very close to achieving very, very good results in all 
three.

Issues in the Program of Action
Finally, in the program of action, those items that are 
bracketed or still in disagreement are threefold:  the issue 
of adolescence, the issue of women's reproductive health care 
services, and the issue of abortion.

Adolescence.  On the issue of adolescence, I would remind all 
of you that by the year 2000 there will be more than 1 
billion teenagers in the world--1 billion teenagers--moving 
into their reproductive health care years.  And it is because 
of the very rapid growth of this group of people that there 
is a sense of urgency.

While the world's rate of population increase has in fact 
gone down from where it had been at a high point, it is still 
well above the replacement rate, and having so many people 
moving into the childbearing years means that there is 
potentially a very sharp increase in the rise of population--
world population.  Today, it is increasing by almost 100 
million per year.  That is the equivalent of a Mexico every 
year or a China every 10 years or, to put it in our terms, a 
New York City every month.

The adolescence issue is very important.  There has been 
controversy surrounding the availability of family planning 
information and services to adolescents.  The Canadians have 
been working on and in the lead on language to sort through 
the adolescence issue.  We have had very extensive 
discussions with Father Martin--the head of the Holy See's 
Delegation--and with others, and I think that the adolescence 
issue is well on the way toward being resolved.

Women's Reproductive Health Care Services.  The second issue 
is theŠrange of reproductive health care services available 
to women.  This issue is of concern to the European Union, 
which is floating a draft proposal on that front which picks 
up on the World Health Organization recommendations related 
to reproductive health care services, and we believe that 
that is well on its way toward being resolved.

Abortion.  The third issue upon which there probably will not 
be agreement at the Cairo Conference is how to deal with the 
abortion question.  Out of 189 countries who participate at 
the United Nations, 172 allow abortion in some form.  Some 
allow the full range of access to abortion.  Others do so 
when the health of the mother is in danger.  Others do so in 
the case only of rape and incest.  It varies all the way 
across the board.

It had been our proposal with Colombia in the spring of 1994 
that we deal with the abortion issue as part of the 
reproductive health care services package and say very 
clearly that reproductive health care services would, of 
course, be made available in any country based upon the 
framework of law, culture, and religion existing in that 
country.

The UN has no right or authority to impose anything on any 
country, and putting this in the context of the laws of each 
country we think is the way in which the abortion issue can 
be resolved to the point where we can end up with that issue 
also, we hope, close to agreement at the conference.

There is very good progress being made on our goals, and the 
remaining three issues--adolescence, reproductive health care 
services, and abortion--we think are also on the way to being 
resolved, especially the issues of adolescence and 
reproductive health-care services.

Security in Cairo
Finally, Mike McCurry released yesterday a statement by the 
United States on the issue of security in Cairo.  We have 
been working very closely with the United Nations and with 
the Egyptian Government on issues of security.  It is clear 
that the Egyptian Government has been anticipating this 
conference.

There was a successful, very large conference of tourism 
people from all over the world held there last spring.  There 
were, despite allegations of problems, no problems 
whatsoever.  The American embassy personnel in Cairo had no 
problems at all for a long period of time, unlike almost any 
other embassy in a large city any place else in the world.

The issues that have been illustrated on a security measure 
occurred south of Cairo--halfway between Cairo and Aswan--in 
an area that has been for 1,000 years the home of a number of 
more radical revolutionary groups. That is where the problem 
occurred the day before yesterday with the unfortunate 
killing of the young Spanish student.  We have advised all 
Americans not to travel through that area of Egypt.  We have 
put out very careful advisories to people on just being 
careful as you would be in any large city, and the United 
States has no intention of changing its plans, and we don't 
know of other delegations who, onŠthe basis of security, have 
made changes in their plans.

We are monitoring the question--the issue--obviously, very 
closely and are in very close touch with as many of the U.S. 
NGOs--citizen groups--that are going to Cairo that we know 
about, and have, again as I said, worked very closely with 
the UN and Egyptian authorities. 

 (###)



ARTICLE 4
Focus on Business

1994 World Summit on Trade Efficiency

World Summit and the Information Superhighway
Exciting business opportunities are likely to mushroom in 
markets around the world in the wake of the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade and North American Free Trade Agreement 
trade liberalizations, but how can entrepreneurs of small- 
and medium-sized businesses participate in the emerging new 
ventures?  Can state-of-the-art technology and the 
information superhighway bring new opportunity as close as 
your computer keyboard?  Where can U.S. entrepreneurs go to 
network with key international public and private decision-
makers with the power to influence marketing and information 
technology opportunities?

These questions--and more--will be answered at the World 
Summit on Trade Efficiency in Columbus, Ohio, October 17-21, 
1994.  It will focus on "trade efficiency"--the use of modern 
information technology to expand international trade.  Co-
sponsored by the UN Conference on Trade and Development 
(UNCTAD), the city of Columbus, and private sector business, 
this unique event will attract national ministers of trade 
and mayors, as well as 2,000 other public and private sector 
leaders from the around the world.

The symposium will consist of four separate but interlinked 
parts:

The UN International Symposium on Trade Efficiency will bring 
together trade ministers and other senior officials from 187 
UNCTAD member countries to discuss the application of new 
technology in inter- national trade.  This meeting will 
review practical measures which can  be taken in customs, 
business information, trade procedures, banking/insurance, 
transport, and telecommunications to facilitate world trade.

At the Global Summit for Mayors, 300 mayors from around the 
world will examine the new local government/private sector 
partnership for development.  Hosted by Columbus Mayor 
Gregory Lashutka, key topics will include municipal 
infrastructure for trade, cities and global competition, and 
the impact of international trade and electronic commerce on 
urban employment.

The Global Executive Trade Summit will concentrate on CEOs 
from small- and medium-sized businesses in assessing 
opportunities and requirements for global trade and building 
strategic advantages in a world of networks.  This summit 
will feature a variety of distinguished speakers and panels 
on such topics as global competition and the information 
revolution, global trade alliances for small- and medium-
sized companies, global payments systems, and restructuring 
business around trade efficiency.  Parallel to the summit 
will be regional focus sessions on business strategies for 
Europe, Africa, Asia, the Western Hemisphere, and the Middle 
East.

The World Trade Efficiency and Technology Exhibition will 
demonstrate a wide spectrum of technologies and applications 
for trade produced by many countries.  The emphasis will be 
on education, with "hands-on" opportunities to try out a 
variety of electronic commercial solutions for trade 
efficiency.  More than 150 prominent exhibitors--including 
the European Union and major multinational corporations--will 
attend.  

The Global Executive Trade Summit and World Trade Efficiency 
and Technology Exhibition are open to CEOs and other senior 
executives from the business community.  In addition, special 
plenary luncheons and receptions, open to all participants, 
will offer an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network with 
other key public and private sector leaders attending this 
unprecedented worldwide symposium.

Pioneering Project in Trade Efficiency
The symposium is linked to an innovative UNCTAD program 
designed to lower the costs of conducting international trade 
and to ease entry by small- and medium-sized businesses into 
global commerce by providing access to resources and 
information that previously may have been unavailable to 
them.  Trade efficiency will lower the cost of international 
trade deals by 10%--a savings of $100 billion each year in 
transaction costs.  This far exceeds the cost savings from 
more conventional tariff and non-tariff reductions.

What Is a "Trade Point"?
The new UNCTAD program uses Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) 
and other technologies to establish a network of Trade Points 
around the globe.  These Trade Points provide electronic 
access to representatives of all the participants needed to 
engage in a trade transaction--from customs to freight 
forwarders, bankers, insurers, and transportation companies.  
Through the network, companies can identify and compete in 
new markets for their products, source components, and raw 
materials, and advertise their goods electronically in a 
multi-media catalog.

In February 1992, UNCTAD authorized the establishment of a 
pilot program of 16 Trade Points.  In August 1992, Columbus, 
Ohio, was designated as the site of the North American Trade 
Point (NATP).  Today, there are 46 Trade Points on five 
continents, and UNCTAD estimates that the Global Trade Point 
network could number in the hundreds by the end of 1995.  The 
global network will be launched officially at the World 
Summit on Trade Efficiency and will be demonstrated at the 
Technology Exhibition.

Technology Simplifies Trade
Rather than search for new solutions or invent new 
technology, the Trade Point Network integrates existing 
resources.  It uses information technology employing the UN 
Electronic Data Inter- change for Administration, Commerce, 
and Transport (EDIFACT) standards, which allow the computers 
of domestic and international trading partners to communicate 
using a standard document format.

The UN estimates that a normal maritime carrier arrives at a 
port with nearly 500 pounds of paper relating to the cargo.  
EDI automates and simplifies the complex paperwork process 
currently required to conduct international trade.  More than 
20,000 U.S. businesses currently use EDI.

High-tech countries, such as the United States, primarily 
will provide their services on-line over computer networks 
and through existing trade assistance organizations.  But the 
Trade Point global network also will benefit developing 
countries--those who currently have limited access to 
information services and technology.  These countries will 
establish multiple Trade Points within their borders to offer 
"walk-in" access to international markets.  For example, 
Colombia's pilot program was so successful, that its leaders 
plan to open dozens of Trade Points, one in every important 
city in the country.

UNCTAD officials believe that the Global Trade Point Network 
creates a level playing field by allowing companies, which 
traditionally would not have the financial and human 
resources to engage in international trade, to do so--
inexpensively and efficiently.   Pilot centers initially were 
established in Bangkok, Thailand; Tunis, Tunisia; Cartagena, 
Colombia; and Columbus, Ohio.  Currently, about 60 countries-
-primarily in the developing world--are in the process of 
establishing Trade Points.  The summit will discuss ways in 
which Trade Points and other new information and technology 
mediums can help smaller firms tap business opportunities 
more efficiently in the expanding global marketplace.

U.S. Delegation
Commerce Secretary Ron Brown will lead the official U.S. 
delegation to the UN conference.  As host Trade Minister, 
Secretary Brown will make welcoming remarks during the 
opening plenary of the event.  Noting the great significance 
of this event for the U.S. business community, he said:  "By 
bringing trade efficiency to the doorstep of all nations, 
large and small, the symposium will open new avenues for 
commerce and development."

Other key speakers at the summit will include U.S. Customs 
Commissioner George Weise, UN Secretary General Boutros 
Boutros Ghali, and a variety of senior-level public and 
private sector leaders from around the world.  Key U.S. 
Government sponsors of the summit include the State 
Department, U.S. Agency for International Development, Small 
Business Administration, and Export-Import Bank.

Columbus:  Crossroads of Trade
Columbus, Ohio, was selected as the international conference 
site because of its prominence as a locus of some of the 
largest data bases, software companies, and computer networks 
in the world.  The city, in the words of Mayor Lashutka, "is 
becoming America's premier inland port city for international 
trade.  Mayors will want to see how we have combined our 
physical and electronic resources to become a key 
distribution point for goods and services in North America."

Further Information
As trade barriers fall and the use of electronic commerce 
grows, this event will be of special importance to CEOs and 
other senior business executives.  For further information, 
including registration costs for the private sector portion 
of the event, companies in the U.S. and elsewhere in the 
Western Hemisphere should contact:

Bannister & Associates
Tel:  614-895-1355
Fax:  614-895-3466

Companies with operations or affiliates overseas may contact:

Touchstone Exhibitions & Conferences Ltd. (London)
Tel:  44 (0) 332 0044
Fax:  44 (0) 81 332 0874.  

Global Trade Point Network
Algeria:  Algiers
Argentina:  Santa Fe
Bolivia:  Cochabamba
Brazil:  Brasilia, Campinas, Florianapolis, Porto Alegre
Cape Verde:  Praia
Chile:  Santiago
China:  Shanghai
Colombia:  Bogota, Cartagena
Cote d'Ivoire:  Abidjan
Ecuador:  Guayaquil
Egypt:  Cairo
Estonia:  Tallinn
Finland:  Helsinki
France:  Grenoble, Lille, Marseille
Gabon:  Libreville
Germany:  Rostock
Hungary:  Budapest
India:  New Delhi
Indonesia:  two Trade Points
Kenya:  Nairobi
South Korea:  Seoul
Mauritania:  Nouakchott
Morocco:  Casablanca
Mozambique:  Maputo
Philippines:  Manila
Portugal:  Lisbon, Porto
Russia:  Moscow
Sao Tome and Principe:  Sao Tome
Senegal:  Dakar
Singapore:  Singapore
Switzerland:  Lausanne
Tanzania:  Dar es Salaam
Thailand:  Bangkok
Tunisia:  Tunis
Ukraine:  Kiev
United Kingdom:  London
United States:  Columbus, Ohio
Zambia:  Lusaka    

(###)


END OF DISPATCH VOL 5, NO 36
                                                             
                                        U.S. Department of 
State 

___________________________________________________

The State Department does not guarantee the 

authenticity of documents on the Internet.  If for 

legal or other reasons you require the original 

version of a document in hard copy, please contact 

the Office of Public Communication, Bureau of Public 

Affairs.



Note that State Department information is not 

copyrighted unless indicated and can be reproduced 

without consent.  Citation of source is appreciated.  

Permission to reproduce any copyrighted material 

(including photos or graphics) must be obtained from 

the original source. 

__________________________________________________







US DEPARTMENT OF STATE DISPATCH

VOLUME 5, NUMBER 36, SEPTEMBER 5, 1994

PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS







ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:



1.  U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security 

Council Resolution 940--Acting Secretary Talbott, 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Deutch, Joint Statement, 

Fact Sheet 

2.  President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement  To 

End Violence in Northern Ireland  

3.  U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference--Timothy E. 

Wirth 

4.  Focus on Business:  1994 World Summit on Trade 

Efficiency  





ARTICLE 1



U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security Council 

Resolution 940

Acting Secretary Talbott, Deputy Secretary of 

Defense Deutch, Joint Statement, Fact Sheet



Acting Secretary Talbott and   Deputy Secretary 

Deutch

Opening remarks at a Department of State press 

briefing, Washington, DC, August 31, 1994 

(introductory remarks deleted).



Acting Secretary Talbott.  I know there was and 

continues to be quite a bit of interest, so we 

thought we would take this opportunity to give you a 

report on our one-day trip to Jamaica for the 

CARICOM joint ministerial meeting and to the 

Dominican Republic to meet with the leadership there 

and also to visit the base of the multilateral 

observer group that is going to be helping the 

Dominicans enforce the sanctions along the 

Dominican-Haitian border.



Let me just say a word or two by way of introduction 

of Secretary Deutch.  There has been a lot in the 

commentary as well as the news articles about our 

Haiti policy--about signals and messages, and those 

two words appeared in a couple of the pieces that 

reported on our trip yesterday.  We make no bones 

about the fact that we are, indeed, trying to send a 

very clear signal and a very clear message, 

primarily to the leadership in Port-au-Prince, and 

we welcome the chance, quite candidly, to reinforce 

that signal and that message again today.



UN Security Council Resolution 940 authorizes the 

international community--the member states of the 

United Nations--to use all necessary means to bring 

about the departure of the dictators from Haiti and 

to establish the conditions that allow the 

restoration of democracy in Haiti.



What was significant about yesterday's meeting in 

Jamaica was that the CARICOM countries committed 

themselves as a group to support  Resolution 940 

and, very specifically,  to the "all necessary 

means" provision.  Four of the seven member states 

of CARICOM that have military forces committed 

themselves to contribute and participate in what we 

are calling the Multinational Force, or MNF.  This 

would be the force that would go into Haiti--either 

under permissive or hostile circumstances--in order 

to carry out the will of the international 

community.



The four states that have committed to participate 

are Jamaica, Barbados, Belize, and Trinidad and 

Tobago.  The other three--Antigua, Bahamas, and 

Guyana--are involved in discussions with our 

government, and we think it is quite possible--

indeed likely--that some of them also will 

contribute.  But the point I want to stress here is 

that CARICOM, as a group, unanimously endorsed the 

action in the next step.



Also, several of the CARICOM states that do not have 

military forces are prepared, we believe, to 

contribute police.  Police will be an extremely 

important part of the international effort in Haiti 

after the departure of the dictators and the 

restoration of democracy.



Deputy Secretary Deutch.  My purpose here in 

appearing with Secretary Talbott--our trip yesterday 

was to make sure that everybody knew, both within 

our government and especially in Haiti, that the 

Defense Department and the State Department are 

together on the policy that we are following.  That 

is a very important point, and it is true in all 

particulars.



The second is the question of the message.  Strobe 

has said it very clearly.  The way I say it is that 

the Multinational Force is going to Haiti.  The 

issue is the circumstances under which that force 

enters Haiti.  It could be under a permissive 

circumstance at the request of the legitimate 

government with the authority of the UN Resolution, 

or it can be under contested circumstances if the de 

facto government--the illegal government--in Haiti 

does not come to its senses and realize that the 

world is determined to see a change in that 

government-- back to the democratically elected 

Government of Haiti.



Our interest in this purpose is very simple.  The 

reason this message is so important is that we would 

like that intervention to take place with the 

minimum number of casualties possible, both for the 

Multinational Force and for the people of Haiti.  It 

is impossible to assure that there will be no 

casualties, of course, in any venture of this kind.  

We want to stress that the intervention--the 

Multinational Force intervention--will have 

overwhelming force associated with it so as to try 

to minimize casualties, should it be needed.  But 

the best of all circumstances will be if the "de 

factos" leave and the legitimate Government of Haiti 

is able to come in with the Multinational Force and 

have this transition to the legitimate government as 

rapidly as possible.



The last point that I would like to make to you is 

that our planning is in place.  As Strobe has 

described, we will integrate in our training, 

beginning immediately at Roosevelt Roads in Puerto 

Rico, the contingents which are coming from the 

CARICOM nations and other contingents as they 

arrive.  That training will include planning 

logistical support, command, control, and 

communications--all the things which are required to 

have an effective integrated force.  But planning 

also, importantly, includes a procedure for turning 

over the responsibilities of the Multinational Force 

to the subsequent phase of a United Nations Mission 

in Haiti, the so-called UNMIH.  So we believe that 

we are ready, when the circumstances warrant, to 

return the legitimate government to Haiti, and we 

will do so as promptly and as effectively as we can-

-once again, with a minimum number of casualties and 

hopefully in the absence of the de facto government 

in that country. 



Joint Statement



Text of a statement issued by CARICOM member 

countries and representatives of the U.S. Government 

at the conclusion of the meeting of CARICOM 

policymakers and heads of the military and police 

personnel, Kingston, Jamaica, August 30, 1994.



CARICOM countries and the United States met here 

today and agreed to coordinate their efforts in 

support of the implementation of United Nations 

Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 940 designed to 

facilitate the departure from Haiti of the military 

leadership consistent with the Governors Island 

Agreement, the prompt return of the legitimately 

elected President and the restoration of the 

legitimate authorities of the Government of Haiti, 

and to establish and maintain a secure and stable 

environment that will permit implementation of the 

Governors Island Agreement.  We anticipate that 

other governments will be joining in this effort.



Staff officers from CARICOM countries will soon join 

with their U.S. counterparts to finalise and 

coordinate arrangements related to their 

participation in the implementation of UNSCR 940.



Argentina and the United Kingdom have also agreed to 

participate in this multinational coalition.  

Argentina has already dispatched a staff officer to 

Atlantic Command headquarters and United Kingdom 

military personnel will assist in the training 

programme for the Multinational Force (MNF).



We were briefed by United Nations personnel 

attending the meeting on the current efforts by 

United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros 

Ghali to seek, through diplomatic means, to secure 

the peaceful implementation of this resolution.



Even as the MNF is established and preparations 

undertaken to participate in the United Nations 

Mission in Haiti (UNMIH), our governments are united 

in the hope that these latest efforts by the UN 

Secretary General will succeed.  However if, once 

again, these efforts fail, then our governments are 

equally united in their determination to take all 

necessary means to carry out the Security Council 

mandate to restore the democratic process in Haiti.



The meeting also discussed preparations for 

deployment of the UNMIH which, in accordance with 

UNSCR 940, will replace the Multinational Force once 

a stable and secure environment has been 

established.  Twelve nations have already expressed 

interest in participating in this operation, 

including many of us represented here today.  All of 

us will continue to work with the United Nations, 

and the Secretary General's Special Representative 

both with respect to the UN peacekeeping role and to 

the UNMIH.



The construction of viable democratic institutions 

and support for acceptable economic and social 

conditions for the Haitian people are tasks to which 

we are fully committed and will make every effort to 

achieve.  Regrettably, these cannot be effectively 

pursued until the political crisis in Haiti is 

resolved.



UNSCR 940 represents the only remaining avenue in 

the process of achieving the objectives of the 

Governors Island Agreement, all others having 

failed.  We remain committed to working for the 

success of that resolution.



We have just learnt that the Haitian military has 

rejected the initiative of the United Nations 

Secretary General.



We condemn the negative response of the Haitian 

military to this latest diplomatic initiative by the 

UN Secretary General and consider the murder of Fr. 

Jean-Marie Vincent, well-known political activist 

and supporter of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, 

as one more unwelcome and painful reminder of the 

total unacceptability of the prevailing situation in 

Haiti and of the need for urgent and decisive action 

as set out in UNSCR 940. 



Fact Sheet:  Caribbean Community



The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is an association 

of 12 independent English-speaking countries and 1 

U.K. dependency.  It was created under the Treaty of 

Chaguaramas in 1973 to increase the economic and 

eventual political integration of these states.



Through CARICOM, Caribbean leaders aim to develop 

common political  and economic positions in order to 

make their countries a more effective regional unit.  

CARICOM strongly supported UN Security Resolution 

940 on Haiti in an August 12, 1994, statement.  It 

also is concerned about the role of Cuba in the 

hemisphere and the future for the region in a post-

Castro era. 



Divergent economic interests, however, have made it 

difficult to implement coordinated policies.   For 

example, CARICOM has faced difficulties in having 

its members implement the agreed-upon Common 

External Tariff.  Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago 

are moving toward liberal trade policies, while the 

smaller countries favor protectionist policies to 

support domestic industries.



In July 1994, CARICOM created the Association of 

Caribbean States (ACS), which includes CARICOM 

members plus the non-English-speaking Caribbean 

islands (including Cuba) and Central American 

countries as well as Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba) and 

Central American countries Venezuela.  Key issues 

such as the location of the Secretariat and funding 

have not been resolved.



In its July 1994 Heads of Government Meeting in 

Bridgetown, Barbados, CARICOM agreed to pursue a 

trade arrangement such as the North American Free 

Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  It also agreed that 

individual members could work bilaterally toward 

such an agreement with the United States.  



CARICOM members are concerned that NAFTA will divert 

investment and trade toward Mexico, particularly in 

the textile and apparel sector.   In response, the 

United States has proposed the Caribbean Basin 

Interim Trade Program to give beneficiaries of the 

Caribbean Basin Initiative essentially the same 

treatment that Mexico receives under NAFTA on 

textile and apparel products.  In return, 

beneficiaries would be asked to join the World Trade 

Organization and agree to improve treatment of 

investment, intellectual property rights, worker 

rights, and the environment.  The program is 

designed to help countries in the region prepare for 

the obligations of closer and fully reciprocal trade 

relations with the United States.   



CARICOM

Secretary General:  Edwin Carrington  (Trinidad and 

Tobago)

Location of Secretariat:  Georgetown, Guyana

Members:   Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, 

Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana

Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, St. 

Vincent and the Grenadines,Trinidad and Tobago 



(###)







ARTICLE 2



President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement To End 

Violence in Northern Ireland



Statement by President Clinton released by the White 

House, Office of the Press Secretary, Washington, 

DC, August 31, 1994.



I welcome today's watershed announcement by the IRA 

that it has decided to end the 25-year campaign of 

violence and pursue the path of peace.  While much 

work remains to be done, the IRA's decision to join 

the political process can mark the beginning of a 

new era that holds the promise of peace for all the 

people of Northern Ireland.



I have just spoken with Prime Minister Albert 

Reynolds of Ireland and Prime Minister John Major of 

the United Kingdom to congratulate them for their 

persistent efforts to bring this day about.  Their 

joint resolve to end the violence and pursue a 

negotiated settlement has been crucial to the 

progress made to date.  Their historic Joint 

Declaration last December, together with the Anglo-

Irish agreement of 1985, have built the foundation 

for the new hope we have today.  I am pleased that 

the United States has been able to contribute to 

this process of reconciliation.



We join with the Governments of Ireland and the 

United Kingdom in the hope and expectation that 

today's step will help bring a lasting and just 

peace to Northern Ireland.  I urge the IRA and all 

who have supported it to fulfill the promise of 

today's announcement to end the use and support of 

violence, just as we continue to call on all parties 

who have sought to achieve political goals through 

violence to cease to do so.  There must be a 

permanent end to the violence.



The United States continues to stand ready to assist 

in advancing the process of peace in Northern 

Ireland.  We hope that both traditions--Unionist and 

Nationalist--will support the only real avenue to 

peace, that of a negotiated settlement to the 

conflict.  



(###)







ARTICLE 3



U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference 

Timothy E. Wirth, Under Secretary for Global Affairs



Opening remarks at a Department of State press 

briefing, Washington, DC, August 31, 1994



The goals of the United States at the Cairo 

Conference are three-fold.  In other words, we would 

like to come out with three results.



A Program of Action

First is a broad, comprehensive program of action.  

The world is sharing in Cairo a sense of urgency 

about the population situation--a sense of urgency 

about the fact that we will not beŠable to reach 

economic development, maintain political stability, 

or sustain ecological structures in the world 

without population stabilization.  This is a sense 

of urgency felt by countries all over the world--

East-West, North-South, rich-poor--and the program 

of action is the template that will come out of 

Cairo outlining what effective population 

stabilization programs can be.  



That program of action--product number one or 

outcome number one--of Cairo has been more than 92% 

agreed to.  For those of you who are into UN 

documentation, UN documents are done by consensus.  

And going into the final negotiations, if areas of a 

document are not agreed upon, they have brackets 

around them.  Going into the Rio Conference in 1992-

-the Earth Summit on Environment--nearly 50% of the 

document was bracketed.  Going into the Human Rights 

Conference in the spring of 1993, nearly 30% of that 

document was bracketed.  Less than 8% of this Cairo 

document is bracketed.  So there has been an 

enormous amount of work done and consensus reached 

on just about every issue.  I will come back to the 

remaining issues.



Funding

The second outcome is funding.  One of the goals of 

the Cairo Conference is to make family planning 

information and services available shortly after the 

turn of the century to every woman and family in the 

world who wants them.  That will be an expensive 

proposition.



Currently, spending is somewhere around $5 to $6 

billion a year in the world on family planning.  The 

cost of making sure that family planning is 

available to all individuals in the world who wish 

to have it will be in the neighborhood of $15 

billion.  So there must be an increase around the 

world.



The United States has begun to work very hard on 

that.  We have increased our own contribution to 

close to $600 million per year directly into family 

planning.  The U.S. is the largest contributor in 

the world.  We have persuaded the Japanese to 

increase their contribution from $40 million a year 

to more than $400 million a year for population and 

AIDS.  The Canadians, the Australians, the European 

Union, the British, the Nordics--have all increased 

their contributions.



The World Bank has made population the number-one 

agenda for them in 1994, and it was the lead issue 

that Lou Preston, the President of the World Bank, 

spoke about at the time of the 50th anniversary of 

the Bretton Woods institutions.  Mr. Preston will be 

one of the opening speakers at the Cairo Conference.



We think we are making very significant progress on 

our second goal, which is the development of the 

financial resources necessary to provide family 

planning to everybody in the world who wants it.



Program Delivery Mechanism

The third goal is the follow-up mechanism--the 

delivery mechanism--for the program of action and 

the funding, and a very ambitious program of 

predominantly women-centered programs around the 

world, focused not only on family planning but on 

the full range of women's reproductive health care 

services.  Child mortality programs, the education 

of children, and the role of women in economic 

development are all part of that follow-up mechanism 

which is being developed in each country.  Some 

countries, such as Indonesia, Egypt, and Bangladesh, 

have very aggressive programs now.  Others want to 

learn from the successes of countries that have done 

very well.



So there are three goals in Cairo--the program of 

action, the funding, and the follow-up mechanism--

and we think that we are very close to achieving 

very, very good results in all three.



Issues in the Program of Action

Finally, in the program of action, those items that 

are bracketed or still in disagreement are 

threefold:  the issue of adolescence, the issue of 

women's reproductive health care services, and the 

issue of abortion.



Adolescence.  On the issue of adolescence, I would 

remind all of you that by the year 2000 there will 

be more than 1 billion teenagers in the world--1 

billion teenagers--moving into their reproductive 

health care years.  And it is because of the very 

rapid growth of this group of people that there is a 

sense of urgency.



While the world's rate of population increase has in 

fact gone down from where it had been at a high 

point, it is still well above the replacement rate, 

and having so many people moving into the 

childbearing years means that there is potentially a 

very sharp increase in the rise of population--world 

population.  Today, it is increasing by almost 100 

million per year.  That is the equivalent of a 

Mexico every year or a China every 10 years or, to 

put it in our terms, a New York City every month.



The adolescence issue is very important.  There has 

been controversy surrounding the availability of 

family planning information and services to 

adolescents.  The Canadians have been working on and 

in the lead on language to sort through the 

adolescence issue.  We have had very extensive 

discussions with Father Martin--the head of the Holy 

See's Delegation--and with others, and I think that 

the adolescence issue is well on the way toward 

being resolved.



Women's Reproductive Health Care Services.  The 

second issue is theŠrange of reproductive health 

care services available to women.  This issue is of 

concern to the European Union, which is floating a 

draft proposal on that front which picks up on the 

World Health Organization recommendations related to 

reproductive health care services, and we believe 

that that is well on its way toward being resolved.



Abortion.  The third issue upon which there probably 

will not be agreement at the Cairo Conference is how 

to deal with the abortion question.  Out of 189 

countries who participate at the United Nations, 172 

allow abortion in some form.  Some allow the full 

range of access to abortion.  Others do so when the 

health of the mother is in danger.  Others do so in 

the case only of rape and incest.  It varies all the 

way across the board.



It had been our proposal with Colombia in the spring 

of 1994 that we deal with the abortion issue as part 

of the reproductive health care services package and 

say very clearly that reproductive health care 

services would, of course, be made available in any 

country based upon the framework of law, culture, 

and religion existing in that country.



The UN has no right or authority to impose anything 

on any country, and putting this in the context of 

the laws of each country we think is the way in 

which the abortion issue can be resolved to the 

point where we can end up with that issue also, we 

hope, close to agreement at the conference.



There is very good progress being made on our goals, 

and the remaining three issues--adolescence, 

reproductive health care services, and abortion--we 

think are also on the way to being resolved, 

especially the issues of adolescence and 

reproductive health-care services.



Security in Cairo

Finally, Mike McCurry released yesterday a statement 

by the United States on the issue of security in 

Cairo.  We have been working very closely with the 

United Nations and with the Egyptian Government on 

issues of security.  It is clear that the Egyptian 

Government has been anticipating this conference.



There was a successful, very large conference of 

tourism people from all over the world held there 

last spring.  There were, despite allegations of 

problems, no problems whatsoever.  The American 

embassy personnel in Cairo had no problems at all 

for a long period of time, unlike almost any other 

embassy in a large city any place else in the world.



The issues that have been illustrated on a security 

measure occurred south of Cairo--halfway between 

Cairo and Aswan--in an area that has been for 1,000 

years the home of a number of more radical 

revolutionary groups. That is where the problem 

occurred the day before yesterday with the 

unfortunate killing of the young Spanish student.  

We have advised all Americans not to travel through 

that area of Egypt.  We have put out very careful 

advisories to people on just being careful as you 

would be in any large city, and the United States 

has no intention of changing its plans, and we don't 

know of other delegations who, onŠthe basis of 

security, have made changes in their plans.



We are monitoring the question--the issue--

obviously, very closely and are in very close touch 

with as many of the U.S. NGOs--citizen groups--that 

are going to Cairo that we know about, and have, 

again as I said, worked very closely with the UN and 

Egyptian authorities. 



 (###)







ARTICLE 4

Focus on Business



1994 World Summit on Trade Efficiency



World Summit and the Information Superhighway

Exciting business opportunities are likely to 

mushroom in markets around the world in the wake of 

the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and North 

American Free Trade Agreement trade liberalizations, 

but how can entrepreneurs of small- and medium-sized 

businesses participate in the emerging new ventures?  

Can state-of-the-art technology and the information 

superhighway bring new opportunity as close as your 

computer keyboard?  Where can U.S. entrepreneurs go 

to network with key international public and private 

decision-makers with the power to influence 

marketing and information technology opportunities?



These questions--and more--will be answered at the 

World Summit on Trade Efficiency in Columbus, Ohio, 

October 17-21, 1994.  It will focus on "trade 

efficiency"--the use of modern information 

technology to expand international trade.  Co-

sponsored by the UN Conference on Trade and 

Development (UNCTAD), the city of Columbus, and 

private sector business, this unique event will 

attract national ministers of trade and mayors, as 

well as 2,000 other public and private sector 

leaders from the around the world.



The symposium will consist of four separate but 

interlinked parts:



The UN International Symposium on Trade Efficiency 

will bring together trade ministers and other senior 

officials from 187 UNCTAD member countries to 

discuss the application of new technology in inter- 

national trade.  This meeting will review practical 

measures which can  be taken in customs, business 

information, trade procedures, banking/insurance, 

transport, and telecommunications to facilitate 

world trade.



At the Global Summit for Mayors, 300 mayors from 

around the world will examine the new local 

government/private sector partnership for 

development.  Hosted by Columbus Mayor Gregory 

Lashutka, key topics will include municipal 

infrastructure for trade, cities and global 

competition, and the impact of international trade 

and electronic commerce on urban employment.



The Global Executive Trade Summit will concentrate 

on CEOs from small- and medium-sized businesses in 

assessing opportunities and requirements for global 

trade and building strategic advantages in a world 

of networks.  This summit will feature a variety of 

distinguished speakers and panels on such topics as 

global competition and the information revolution, 

global trade alliances for small- and medium-sized 

companies, global payments systems, and 

restructuring business around trade efficiency.  

Parallel to the summit will be regional focus 

sessions on business strategies for Europe, Africa, 

Asia, the Western Hemisphere, and the Middle East.



The World Trade Efficiency and Technology Exhibition 

will demonstrate a wide spectrum of technologies and 

applications for trade produced by many countries.  

The emphasis will be on education, with "hands-on" 

opportunities to try out a variety of electronic 

commercial solutions for trade efficiency.  More 

than 150 prominent exhibitors--including the 

European Union and major multinational corporations-

-will attend.  



The Global Executive Trade Summit and World Trade 

Efficiency and Technology Exhibition are open to 

CEOs and other senior executives from the business 

community.  In addition, special plenary luncheons 

and receptions, open to all participants, will offer 

an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network with 

other key public and private sector leaders 

attending this unprecedented worldwide symposium.



Pioneering Project in Trade Efficiency

The symposium is linked to an innovative UNCTAD 

program designed to lower the costs of conducting 

international trade and to ease entry by small- and 

medium-sized businesses into global commerce by 

providing access to resources and information that 

previously may have been unavailable to them.  Trade 

efficiency will lower the cost of international 

trade deals by 10%--a savings of $100 billion each 

year in transaction costs.  This far exceeds the 

cost savings from more conventional tariff and non-

tariff reductions.



What Is a "Trade Point"?



The new UNCTAD program uses Electronic Data 

Interchange (EDI) and other technologies to 

establish a network of Trade Points around the 

globe.  These Trade Points provide electronic access 

to representatives of all the participants needed to 

engage in a trade transaction--from customs to 

freight forwarders, bankers, insurers, and 

transportation companies.  Through the network, 

companies can identify and compete in new markets 

for their products, source components, and raw 

materials, and advertise their goods electronically 

in a multi-media catalog.



In February 1992, UNCTAD authorized the 

establishment of a pilot program of 16 Trade Points.  

In August 1992, Columbus, Ohio, was designated as 

the site of the North American Trade Point (NATP).  

Today, there are 46 Trade Points on five continents, 

and UNCTAD estimates that the Global Trade Point 

network could number in the hundreds by the end of 

1995.  The global network will be launched 

officially at the World Summit on Trade Efficiency 

and will be demonstrated at the Technology 

Exhibition.



Technology Simplifies Trade



Rather than search for new solutions or invent new 

technology, the Trade Point Network integrates 

existing resources.  It uses information technology 

employing the UN Electronic Data Inter- change for 

Administration, Commerce, and Transport (EDIFACT) 

standards, which allow the computers of domestic and 

international trading partners to communicate using 

a standard document format.



The UN estimates that a normal maritime carrier 

arrives at a port with nearly 500 pounds of paper 

relating to the cargo.  EDI automates and simplifies 

the complex paperwork process currently required to 

conduct international trade.  More than 20,000 U.S. 

businesses currently use EDI.



High-tech countries, such as the United States, 

primarily will provide their services on-line over 

computer networks and through existing trade 

assistance organizations.  But the Trade Point 

global network also will benefit developing 

countries--those who currently have limited access 

to information services and technology.  These 

countries will establish multiple Trade Points 

within their borders to offer "walk-in" access to 

international markets.  For example, Colombia's 

pilot program was so successful, that its leaders 

plan to open dozens of Trade Points, one in every 

important city in the country.



UNCTAD officials believe that the Global Trade Point 

Network creates a level playing field by allowing 

companies, which traditionally would not have the 

financial and human resources to engage in 

international trade, to do so--inexpensively and 

efficiently.   Pilot centers initially were 

established in Bangkok, Thailand; Tunis, Tunisia; 

Cartagena, Colombia; and Columbus, Ohio.  Currently, 

about 60 countries--primarily in the developing 

world--are in the process of establishing Trade 

Points.  The summit will discuss ways in which Trade 

Points and other new information and technology 

mediums can help smaller firms tap business 

opportunities more efficiently in the expanding 

global marketplace.



U.S. Delegation



Commerce Secretary Ron Brown will lead the official 

U.S. delegation to the UN conference.  As host Trade 

Minister, Secretary Brown will make welcoming 

remarks during the opening plenary of the event.  

Noting the great significance of this event for the 

U.S. business community, he said:  "By bringing 

trade efficiency to the doorstep of all nations, 

large and small, the symposium will open new avenues 

for commerce and development."



Other key speakers at the summit will include U.S. 

Customs Commissioner George Weise, UN Secretary 

General Boutros Boutros Ghali, and a variety of 

senior-level public and private sector leaders from 

around the world.  Key U.S. Government sponsors of 

the summit include the State Department, U.S. Agency 

for International Development, Small Business 

Administration, and Export-Import Bank.



Columbus:  Crossroads of Trade



Columbus, Ohio, was selected as the international 

conference site because of its prominence as a locus 

of some of the largest data bases, software 

companies, and computer networks in the world.  The 

city, in the words of Mayor Lashutka, "is becoming 

America's premier inland port city for international 

trade.  Mayors will want to see how we have combined 

our physical and electronic resources to become a 

key distribution point for goods and services in 

North America."



Further Information



As trade barriers fall and the use of electronic 

commerce grows, this event will be of special 

importance to CEOs and other senior business 

executives.  For further information, including 

registration costs for the private sector portion of 

the event, companies in the U.S. and elsewhere in 

the Western Hemisphere should contact:



Bannister & Associates

Tel:  614-895-1355

Fax:  614-895-3466



Companies with operations or affiliates overseas may 

contact:



Touchstone Exhibitions & Conferences Ltd. (London)

Tel:  44 (0) 332 0044

Fax:  44 (0) 81 332 0874.  



Global Trade Point Network

Algeria:  Algiers

Argentina:  Santa Fe

Bolivia:  Cochabamba

Brazil:  Brasilia, Campinas, Florianapolis, Porto 

Alegre

Cape Verde:  Praia

Chile:  Santiago

China:  Shanghai

Colombia:  Bogota, Cartagena

Cote d'Ivoire:  Abidjan

Ecuador:  Guayaquil

Egypt:  Cairo

Estonia:  Tallinn

Finland:  Helsinki

France:  Grenoble, Lille, Marseille

Gabon:  Libreville

Germany:  Rostock

Hungary:  Budapest

India:  New Delhi

Indonesia:  two Trade Points

Kenya:  Nairobi

South Korea:  Seoul

Mauritania:  Nouakchott

Morocco:  Casablanca

Mozambique:  Maputo

Philippines:  Manila

Portugal:  Lisbon, Porto

Russia:  Moscow

Sao Tome and Principe:  Sao Tome

Senegal:  Dakar

Singapore:  Singapore

Switzerland:  Lausanne

Tanzania:  Dar es Salaam

Thailand:  Bangkok

Tunisia:  Tunis

Ukraine:  Kiev

United Kingdom:  London

United States:  Columbus, Ohio

Zambia:  Lusaka    



(###)





[END OF DISPATCH VOL 5, NO 36]

                 U.S. Department of State 

___________________________________________________

The State Department does not guarantee the 

authenticity of documents on the Internet.  If for 

legal or other reasons you require the original 

version of a document in hard copy, please contact 

the Office of Public Communication, Bureau of Public 

Affairs.



Note that State Department information is not 

copyrighted unless indicated and can be reproduced 

without consent.  Citation of source is appreciated.  

Permission to reproduce any copyrighted material 

(including photos or graphics) must be obtained from 

the original source. 

__________________________________________________







US DEPARTMENT OF STATE DISPATCH

VOLUME 5, NUMBER 36, SEPTEMBER 5, 1994

PUBLISHED BY THE BUREAU OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS







ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:



1.  U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security 

Council Resolution 940--Acting Secretary Talbott, 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Deutch, Joint Statement, 

Fact Sheet 

2.  President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement  To 

End Violence in Northern Ireland  

3.  U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference--Timothy E. 

Wirth 

4.  Focus on Business:  1994 World Summit on Trade 

Efficiency  





ARTICLE 1



U.S.-CARICOM Efforts To Support UN Security Council 

Resolution 940

Acting Secretary Talbott, Deputy Secretary of 

Defense Deutch, Joint Statement, Fact Sheet



Acting Secretary Talbott and   Deputy Secretary 

Deutch

Opening remarks at a Department of State press 

briefing, Washington, DC, August 31, 1994 

(introductory remarks deleted).



Acting Secretary Talbott.  I know there was and 

continues to be quite a bit of interest, so we 

thought we would take this opportunity to give you a 

report on our one-day trip to Jamaica for the 

CARICOM joint ministerial meeting and to the 

Dominican Republic to meet with the leadership there 

and also to visit the base of the multilateral 

observer group that is going to be helping the 

Dominicans enforce the sanctions along the 

Dominican-Haitian border.



Let me just say a word or two by way of introduction 

of Secretary Deutch.  There has been a lot in the 

commentary as well as the news articles about our 

Haiti policy--about signals and messages, and those 

two words appeared in a couple of the pieces that 

reported on our trip yesterday.  We make no bones 

about the fact that we are, indeed, trying to send a 

very clear signal and a very clear message, 

primarily to the leadership in Port-au-Prince, and 

we welcome the chance, quite candidly, to reinforce 

that signal and that message again today.



UN Security Council Resolution 940 authorizes the 

international community--the member states of the 

United Nations--to use all necessary means to bring 

about the departure of the dictators from Haiti and 

to establish the conditions that allow the 

restoration of democracy in Haiti.



What was significant about yesterday's meeting in 

Jamaica was that the CARICOM countries committed 

themselves as a group to support  Resolution 940 

and, very specifically,  to the "all necessary 

means" provision.  Four of the seven member states 

of CARICOM that have military forces committed 

themselves to contribute and participate in what we 

are calling the Multinational Force, or MNF.  This 

would be the force that would go into Haiti--either 

under permissive or hostile circumstances--in order 

to carry out the will of the international 

community.



The four states that have committed to participate 

are Jamaica, Barbados, Belize, and Trinidad and 

Tobago.  The other three--Antigua, Bahamas, and 

Guyana--are involved in discussions with our 

government, and we think it is quite possible--

indeed likely--that some of them also will 

contribute.  But the point I want to stress here is 

that CARICOM, as a group, unanimously endorsed the 

action in the next step.



Also, several of the CARICOM states that do not have 

military forces are prepared, we believe, to 

contribute police.  Police will be an extremely 

important part of the international effort in Haiti 

after the departure of the dictators and the 

restoration of democracy.



Deputy Secretary Deutch.  My purpose here in 

appearing with Secretary Talbott--our trip yesterday 

was to make sure that everybody knew, both within 

our government and especially in Haiti, that the 

Defense Department and the State Department are 

together on the policy that we are following.  That 

is a very important point, and it is true in all 

particulars.



The second is the question of the message.  Strobe 

has said it very clearly.  The way I say it is that 

the Multinational Force is going to Haiti.  The 

issue is the circumstances under which that force 

enters Haiti.  It could be under a permissive 

circumstance at the request of the legitimate 

government with the authority of the UN Resolution, 

or it can be under contested circumstances if the de 

facto government--the illegal government--in Haiti 

does not come to its senses and realize that the 

world is determined to see a change in that 

government-- back to the democratically elected 

Government of Haiti.



Our interest in this purpose is very simple.  The 

reason this message is so important is that we would 

like that intervention to take place with the 

minimum number of casualties possible, both for the 

Multinational Force and for the people of Haiti.  It 

is impossible to assure that there will be no 

casualties, of course, in any venture of this kind.  

We want to stress that the intervention--the 

Multinational Force intervention--will have 

overwhelming force associated with it so as to try 

to minimize casualties, should it be needed.  But 

the best of all circumstances will be if the "de 

factos" leave and the legitimate Government of Haiti 

is able to come in with the Multinational Force and 

have this transition to the legitimate government as 

rapidly as possible.



The last point that I would like to make to you is 

that our planning is in place.  As Strobe has 

described, we will integrate in our training, 

beginning immediately at Roosevelt Roads in Puerto 

Rico, the contingents which are coming from the 

CARICOM nations and other contingents as they 

arrive.  That training will include planning 

logistical support, command, control, and 

communications--all the things which are required to 

have an effective integrated force.  But planning 

also, importantly, includes a procedure for turning 

over the responsibilities of the Multinational Force 

to the subsequent phase of a United Nations Mission 

in Haiti, the so-called UNMIH.  So we believe that 

we are ready, when the circumstances warrant, to 

return the legitimate government to Haiti, and we 

will do so as promptly and as effectively as we can-

-once again, with a minimum number of casualties and 

hopefully in the absence of the de facto government 

in that country. 



Joint Statement



Text of a statement issued by CARICOM member 

countries and representatives of the U.S. Government 

at the conclusion of the meeting of CARICOM 

policymakers and heads of the military and police 

personnel, Kingston, Jamaica, August 30, 1994.



CARICOM countries and the United States met here 

today and agreed to coordinate their efforts in 

support of the implementation of United Nations 

Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 940 designed to 

facilitate the departure from Haiti of the military 

leadership consistent with the Governors Island 

Agreement, the prompt return of the legitimately 

elected President and the restoration of the 

legitimate authorities of the Government of Haiti, 

and to establish and maintain a secure and stable 

environment that will permit implementation of the 

Governors Island Agreement.  We anticipate that 

other governments will be joining in this effort.



Staff officers from CARICOM countries will soon join 

with their U.S. counterparts to finalise and 

coordinate arrangements related to their 

participation in the implementation of UNSCR 940.



Argentina and the United Kingdom have also agreed to 

participate in this multinational coalition.  

Argentina has already dispatched a staff officer to 

Atlantic Command headquarters and United Kingdom 

military personnel will assist in the training 

programme for the Multinational Force (MNF).



We were briefed by United Nations personnel 

attending the meeting on the current efforts by 

United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros 

Ghali to seek, through diplomatic means, to secure 

the peaceful implementation of this resolution.



Even as the MNF is established and preparations 

undertaken to participate in the United Nations 

Mission in Haiti (UNMIH), our governments are united 

in the hope that these latest efforts by the UN 

Secretary General will succeed.  However if, once 

again, these efforts fail, then our governments are 

equally united in their determination to take all 

necessary means to carry out the Security Council 

mandate to restore the democratic process in Haiti.



The meeting also discussed preparations for 

deployment of the UNMIH which, in accordance with 

UNSCR 940, will replace the Multinational Force once 

a stable and secure environment has been 

established.  Twelve nations have already expressed 

interest in participating in this operation, 

including many of us represented here today.  All of 

us will continue to work with the United Nations, 

and the Secretary General's Special Representative 

both with respect to the UN peacekeeping role and to 

the UNMIH.



The construction of viable democratic institutions 

and support for acceptable economic and social 

conditions for the Haitian people are tasks to which 

we are fully committed and will make every effort to 

achieve.  Regrettably, these cannot be effectively 

pursued until the political crisis in Haiti is 

resolved.



UNSCR 940 represents the only remaining avenue in 

the process of achieving the objectives of the 

Governors Island Agreement, all others having 

failed.  We remain committed to working for the 

success of that resolution.



We have just learnt that the Haitian military has 

rejected the initiative of the United Nations 

Secretary General.



We condemn the negative response of the Haitian 

military to this latest diplomatic initiative by the 

UN Secretary General and consider the murder of Fr. 

Jean-Marie Vincent, well-known political activist 

and supporter of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, 

as one more unwelcome and painful reminder of the 

total unacceptability of the prevailing situation in 

Haiti and of the need for urgent and decisive action 

as set out in UNSCR 940. 



Fact Sheet:  Caribbean Community



The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is an association 

of 12 independent English-speaking countries and 1 

U.K. dependency.  It was created under the Treaty of 

Chaguaramas in 1973 to increase the economic and 

eventual political integration of these states.



Through CARICOM, Caribbean leaders aim to develop 

common political  and economic positions in order to 

make their countries a more effective regional unit.  

CARICOM strongly supported UN Security Resolution 

940 on Haiti in an August 12, 1994, statement.  It 

also is concerned about the role of Cuba in the 

hemisphere and the future for the region in a post-

Castro era. 



Divergent economic interests, however, have made it 

difficult to implement coordinated policies.   For 

example, CARICOM has faced difficulties in having 

its members implement the agreed-upon Common 

External Tariff.  Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago 

are moving toward liberal trade policies, while the 

smaller countries favor protectionist policies to 

support domestic industries.



In July 1994, CARICOM created the Association of 

Caribbean States (ACS), which includes CARICOM 

members plus the non-English-speaking Caribbean 

islands (including Cuba) and Central American 

countries as well as Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba) and 

Central American countries Venezuela.  Key issues 

such as the location of the Secretariat and funding 

have not been resolved.



In its July 1994 Heads of Government Meeting in 

Bridgetown, Barbados, CARICOM agreed to pursue a 

trade arrangement such as the North American Free 

Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  It also agreed that 

individual members could work bilaterally toward 

such an agreement with the United States.  



CARICOM members are concerned that NAFTA will divert 

investment and trade toward Mexico, particularly in 

the textile and apparel sector.   In response, the 

United States has proposed the Caribbean Basin 

Interim Trade Program to give beneficiaries of the 

Caribbean Basin Initiative essentially the same 

treatment that Mexico receives under NAFTA on 

textile and apparel products.  In return, 

beneficiaries would be asked to join the World Trade 

Organization and agree to improve treatment of 

investment, intellectual property rights, worker 

rights, and the environment.  The program is 

designed to help countries in the region prepare for 

the obligations of closer and fully reciprocal trade 

relations with the United States.   



CARICOM

Secretary General:  Edwin Carrington  (Trinidad and 

Tobago)

Location of Secretariat:  Georgetown, Guyana

Members:   Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, 

Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana

Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, St. 

Vincent and the Grenadines,Trinidad and Tobago 



(###)







ARTICLE 2



President Clinton Welcomes IRA Announcement To End 

Violence in Northern Ireland



Statement by President Clinton released by the White 

House, Office of the Press Secretary, Washington, 

DC, August 31, 1994.



I welcome today's watershed announcement by the IRA 

that it has decided to end the 25-year campaign of 

violence and pursue the path of peace.  While much 

work remains to be done, the IRA's decision to join 

the political process can mark the beginning of a 

new era that holds the promise of peace for all the 

people of Northern Ireland.



I have just spoken with Prime Minister Albert 

Reynolds of Ireland and Prime Minister John Major of 

the United Kingdom to congratulate them for their 

persistent efforts to bring this day about.  Their 

joint resolve to end the violence and pursue a 

negotiated settlement has been crucial to the 

progress made to date.  Their historic Joint 

Declaration last December, together with the Anglo-

Irish agreement of 1985, have built the foundation 

for the new hope we have today.  I am pleased that 

the United States has been able to contribute to 

this process of reconciliation.



We join with the Governments of Ireland and the 

United Kingdom in the hope and expectation that 

today's step will help bring a lasting and just 

peace to Northern Ireland.  I urge the IRA and all 

who have supported it to fulfill the promise of 

today's announcement to end the use and support of 

violence, just as we continue to call on all parties 

who have sought to achieve political goals through 

violence to cease to do so.  There must be a 

permanent end to the violence.



The United States continues to stand ready to assist 

in advancing the process of peace in Northern 

Ireland.  We hope that both traditions--Unionist and 

Nationalist--will support the only real avenue to 

peace, that of a negotiated settlement to the 

conflict.  



(###)







ARTICLE 3



U.S. Goals at the Cairo Conference 

Timothy E. Wirth, Under Secretary for Global Affairs



Opening remarks at a Department of State press 

briefing, Washington, DC, August 31, 1994



The goals of the United States at the Cairo 

Conference are three-fold.  In other words, we would 

like to come out with three results.



A Program of Action

First is a broad, comprehensive program of action.  

The world is sharing in Cairo a sense of urgency 

about the population situation--a sense of urgency 

about the fact that we will not beŠable to reach 

economic development, maintain political stability, 

or sustain ecological structures in the world 

without population stabilization.  This is a sense 

of urgency felt by countries all over the world--

East-West, North-South, rich-poor--and the program 

of action is the template that will come out of 

Cairo outlining what effective population 

stabilization programs can be.  



That program of action--product number one or 

outcome number one--of Cairo has been more than 92% 

agreed to.  For those of you who are into UN 

documentation, UN documents are done by consensus.  

And going into the final negotiations, if areas of a 

document are not agreed upon, they have brackets 

around them.  Going into the Rio Conference in 1992-

-the Earth Summit on Environment--nearly 50% of the 

document was bracketed.  Going into the Human Rights 

Conference in the spring of 1993, nearly 30% of that 

document was bracketed.  Less than 8% of this Cairo 

document is bracketed.  So there has been an 

enormous amount of work done and consensus reached 

on just about every issue.  I will come back to the 

remaining issues.



Funding

The second outcome is funding.  One of the goals of 

the Cairo Conference is to make family planning 

information and services available shortly after the 

turn of the century to every woman and family in the 

world who wants them.  That will be an expensive 

proposition.



Currently, spending is somewhere around $5 to $6 

billion a year in the world on family planning.  The 

cost of making sure that family planning is 

available to all individuals in the world who wish 

to have it will be in the neighborhood of $15 

billion.  So there must be an increase around the 

world.



The United States has begun to work very hard on 

that.  We have increased our own contribution to 

close to $600 million per year directly into family 

planning.  The U.S. is the largest contributor in 

the world.  We have persuaded the Japanese to 

increase their contribution from $40 million a year 

to more than $400 million a year for population and 

AIDS.  The Canadians, the Australians, the European 

Union, the British, the Nordics--have all increased 

their contributions.



The World Bank has made population the number-one 

agenda for them in 1994, and it was the lead issue 

that Lou Preston, the President of the World Bank, 

spoke about at the time of the 50th anniversary of 

the Bretton Woods institutions.  Mr. Preston will be 

one of the opening speakers at the Cairo Conference.



We think we are making very significant progress on 

our second goal, which is the development of the 

financial resources necessary to provide family 

planning to everybody in the world who wants it.



Program Delivery Mechanism

The third goal is the follow-up mechanism--the 

delivery mechanism--for the program of action and 

the funding, and a very ambitious program of 

predominantly women-centered programs around the 

world, focused not only on family planning but on 

the full range of women's reproductive health care 

services.  Child mortality programs, the education 

of children, and the role of women in economic 

development are all part of that follow-up mechanism 

which is being developed in each country.  Some 

countries, such as Indonesia, Egypt, and Bangladesh, 

have very aggressive programs now.  Others want to 

learn from the successes of countries that have done 

very well.



So there are three goals in Cairo--the program of 

action, the funding, and the follow-up mechanism--

and we think that we are very close to achieving 

very, very good results in all three.



Issues in the Program of Action

Finally, in the program of action, those items that 

are bracketed or still in disagreement are 

threefold:  the issue of adolescence, the issue of 

women's reproductive health care services, and the 

issue of abortion.



Adolescence.  On the issue of adolescence, I would 

remind all of you that by the year 2000 there will 

be more than 1 billion teenagers in the world--1 

billion teenagers--moving into their reproductive 

health care years.  And it is because of the very 

rapid growth of this group of people that there is a 

sense of urgency.



While the world's rate of population increase has in 

fact gone down from where it had been at a high 

point, it is still well above the replacement rate, 

and having so many people moving into the 

childbearing years means that there is potentially a 

very sharp increase in the rise of population--world 

population.  Today, it is increasing by almost 100 

million per year.  That is the equivalent of a 

Mexico every year or a China every 10 years or, to 

put it in our terms, a New York City every month.



The adolescence issue is very important.  There has 

been controversy surrounding the availability of 

family planning information and services to 

adolescents.  The Canadians have been working on and 

in the lead on language to sort through the 

adolescence issue.  We have had very extensive 

discussions with Father Martin--the head of the Holy 

See's Delegation--and with others, and I think that 

the adolescence issue is well on the way toward 

being resolved.



Women's Reproductive Health Care Services.  The 

second issue is theŠrange of reproductive health 

care services available to women.  This issue is of 

concern to the European Union, which is floating a 

draft proposal on that front which picks up on the 

World Health Organization recommendations related to 

reproductive health care services, and we believe 

that that is well on its way toward being resolved.



Abortion.  The third issue upon which there probably 

will not be agreement at the Cairo Conference is how 

to deal with the abortion question.  Out of 189 

countries who participate at the United Nations, 172 

allow abortion in some form.  Some allow the full 

range of access to abortion.  Others do so when the 

health of the mother is in danger.  Others do so in 

the case only of rape and incest.  It varies all the 

way across the board.



It had been our proposal with Colombia in the spring 

of 1994 that we deal with the abortion issue as part 

of the reproductive health care services package and 

say very clearly that reproductive health care 

services would, of course, be made available in any 

country based upon the framework of law, culture, 

and religion existing in that country.



The UN has no right or authority to impose anything 

on any country, and putting this in the context of 

the laws of each country we think is the way in 

which the abortion issue can be resolved to the 

point where we can end up with that issue also, we 

hope, close to agreement at the conference.



There is very good progress being made on our goals, 

and the remaining three issues--adolescence, 

reproductive health care services, and abortion--we 

think are also on the way to being resolved, 

especially the issues of adolescence and 

reproductive health-care services.



Security in Cairo

Finally, Mike McCurry released yesterday a statement 

by the United States on the issue of security in 

Cairo.  We have been working very closely with the 

United Nations and with the Egyptian Government on 

issues of security.  It is clear that the Egyptian 

Government has been anticipating this conference.



There was a successful, very large conference of 

tourism people from all over the world held there 

last spring.  There were, despite allegations of 

problems, no problems whatsoever.  The American 

embassy personnel in Cairo had no problems at all 

for a long period of time, unlike almost any other 

embassy in a large city any place else in the world.



The issues that have been illustrated on a security 

measure occurred south of Cairo--halfway between 

Cairo and Aswan--in an area that has been for 1,000 

years the home of a number of more radical 

revolutionary groups. That is where the problem 

occurred the day before yesterday with the 

unfortunate killing of the young Spanish student.  

We have advised all Americans not to travel through 

that area of Egypt.  We have put out very careful 

advisories to people on just being careful as you 

would be in any large city, and the United States 

has no intention of changing its plans, and we don't 

know of other delegations who, onŠthe basis of 

security, have made changes in their plans.



We are monitoring the question--the issue--

obviously, very closely and are in very close touch 

with as many of the U.S. NGOs--citizen groups--that 

are going to Cairo that we know about, and have, 

again as I said, worked very closely with the UN and 

Egyptian authorities. 



 (###)







ARTICLE 4

Focus on Business



1994 World Summit on Trade Efficiency



World Summit and the Information Superhighway

Exciting business opportunities are likely to 

mushroom in markets around the world in the wake of 

the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and North 

American Free Trade Agreement trade liberalizations, 

but how can entrepreneurs of small- and medium-sized 

businesses participate in the emerging new ventures?  

Can state-of-the-art technology and the information 

superhighway bring new opportunity as close as your 

computer keyboard?  Where can U.S. entrepreneurs go 

to network with key international public and private 

decision-makers with the power to influence 

marketing and information technology opportunities?



These questions--and more--will be answered at the 

World Summit on Trade Efficiency in Columbus, Ohio, 

October 17-21, 1994.  It will focus on "trade 

efficiency"--the use of modern information 

technology to expand international trade.  Co-

sponsored by the UN Conference on Trade and 

Development (UNCTAD), the city of Columbus, and 

private sector business, this unique event will 

attract national ministers of trade and mayors, as 

well as 2,000 other public and private sector 

leaders from the around the world.



The symposium will consist of four separate but 

interlinked parts:



The UN International Symposium on Trade Efficiency 

will bring together trade ministers and other senior 

officials from 187 UNCTAD member countries to 

discuss the application of new technology in inter- 

national trade.  This meeting will review practical 

measures which can  be taken in customs, business 

information, trade procedures, banking/insurance, 

transport, and telecommunications to facilitate 

world trade.



At the Global Summit for Mayors, 300 mayors from 

around the world will examine the new local 

government/private sector partnership for 

development.  Hosted by Columbus Mayor Gregory 

Lashutka, key topics will include municipal 

infrastructure for trade, cities and global 

competition, and the impact of international trade 

and electronic commerce on urban employment.



The Global Executive Trade Summit will concentrate 

on CEOs from small- and medium-sized businesses in 

assessing opportunities and requirements for global 

trade and building strategic advantages in a world 

of networks.  This summit will feature a variety of 

distinguished speakers and panels on such topics as 

global competition and the information revolution, 

global trade alliances for small- and medium-sized 

companies, global payments systems, and 

restructuring business around trade efficiency.  

Parallel to the summit will be regional focus 

sessions on business strategies for Europe, Africa, 

Asia, the Western Hemisphere, and the Middle East.



The World Trade Efficiency and Technology Exhibition 

will demonstrate a wide spectrum of technologies and 

applications for trade produced by many countries.  

The emphasis will be on education, with "hands-on" 

opportunities to try out a variety of electronic 

commercial solutions for trade efficiency.  More 

than 150 prominent exhibitors--including the 

European Union and major multinational corporations-

-will attend.  



The Global Executive Trade Summit and World Trade 

Efficiency and Technology Exhibition are open to 

CEOs and other senior executives from the business 

community.  In addition, special plenary luncheons 

and receptions, open to all participants, will offer 

an opportunity for entrepreneurs to network with 

other key public and private sector leaders 

attending this unprecedented worldwide symposium.



Pioneering Project in Trade Efficiency

The symposium is linked to an innovative UNCTAD 

program designed to lower the costs of conducting 

international trade and to ease entry by small- and 

medium-sized businesses into global commerce by 

providing access to resources and information that 

previously may have been unavailable to them.  Trade 

efficiency will lower the cost of international 

trade deals by 10%--a savings of $100 billion each 

year in transaction costs.  This far exceeds the 

cost savings from more conventional tariff and non-

tariff reductions.



What Is a "Trade Point"?



The new UNCTAD program uses Electronic Data 

Interchange (EDI) and other technologies to 

establish a network of Trade Points around the 

globe.  These Trade Points provide electronic access 

to representatives of all the participants needed to 

engage in a trade transaction--from customs to 

freight forwarders, bankers, insurers, and 

transportation companies.  Through the network, 

companies can identify and compete in new markets 

for their products, source components, and raw 

materials, and advertise their goods electronically 

in a multi-media catalog.



In February 1992, UNCTAD authorized the 

establishment of a pilot program of 16 Trade Points.  

In August 1992, Columbus, Ohio, was designated as 

the site of the North American Trade Point (NATP).  

Today, there are 46 Trade Points on five continents, 

and UNCTAD estimates that the Global Trade Point 

network could number in the hundreds by the end of 

1995.  The global network will be launched 

officially at the World Summit on Trade Efficiency 

and will be demonstrated at the Technology 

Exhibition.



Technology Simplifies Trade



Rather than search for new solutions or invent new 

technology, the Trade Point Network integrates 

existing resources.  It uses information technology 

employing the UN Electronic Data Inter- change for 

Administration, Commerce, and Transport (EDIFACT) 

standards, which allow the computers of domestic and 

international trading partners to communicate using 

a standard document format.



The UN estimates that a normal maritime carrier 

arrives at a port with nearly 500 pounds of paper 

relating to the cargo.  EDI automates and simplifies 

the complex paperwork process currently required to 

conduct international trade.  More than 20,000 U.S. 

businesses currently use EDI.



High-tech countries, such as the United States, 

primarily will provide their services on-line over 

computer networks and through existing trade 

assistance organizations.  But the Trade Point 

global network also will benefit developing 

countries--those who currently have limited access 

to information services and technology.  These 

countries will establish multiple Trade Points 

within their borders to offer "walk-in" access to 

international markets.  For example, Colombia's 

pilot program was so successful, that its leaders 

plan to open dozens of Trade Points, one in every 

important city in the country.



UNCTAD officials believe that the Global Trade Point 

Network creates a level playing field by allowing 

companies, which traditionally would not have the 

financial and human resources to engage in 

international trade, to do so--inexpensively and 

efficiently.   Pilot centers initially were 

established in Bangkok, Thailand; Tunis, Tunisia; 

Cartagena, Colombia; and Columbus, Ohio.  Currently, 

about 60 countries--primarily in the developing 

world--are in the process of establishing Trade 

Points.  The summit will discuss ways in which Trade 

Points and other new information and technology 

mediums can help smaller firms tap business 

opportunities more efficiently in the expanding 

global marketplace.



U.S. Delegation



Commerce Secretary Ron Brown will lead the official 

U.S. delegation to the UN conference.  As host Trade 

Minister, Secretary Brown will make welcoming 

remarks during the opening plenary of the event.  

Noting the great significance of this event for the 

U.S. business community, he said:  "By bringing 

trade efficiency to the doorstep of all nations, 

large and small, the symposium will open new avenues 

for commerce and development."



Other key speakers at the summit will include U.S. 

Customs Commissioner George Weise, UN Secretary 

General Boutros Boutros Ghali, and a variety of 

senior-level public and private sector leaders from 

around the world.  Key U.S. Government sponsors of 

the summit include the State Department, U.S. Agency 

for International Development, Small Business 

Administration, and Export-Import Bank.



Columbus:  Crossroads of Trade



Columbus, Ohio, was selected as the international 

conference site because of its prominence as a locus 

of some of the largest data bases, software 

companies, and computer networks in the world.  The 

city, in the words of Mayor Lashutka, "is becoming 

America's premier inland port city for international 

trade.  Mayors will want to see how we have combined 

our physical and electronic resources to become a 

key distribution point for goods and services in 

North America."



Further Information



As trade barriers fall and the use of electronic 

commerce grows, this event will be of special 

importance to CEOs and other senior business 

executives.  For further information, including 

registration costs for the private sector portion of 

the event, companies in the U.S. and elsewhere in 

the Western Hemisphere should contact:



Bannister & Associates

Tel:  614-895-1355

Fax:  614-895-3466



Companies with operations or affiliates overseas may 

contact:



Touchstone Exhibitions & Conferences Ltd. (London)

Tel:  44 (0) 332 0044

Fax:  44 (0) 81 332 0874.  



Global Trade Point Network

Algeria:  Algiers

Argentina:  Santa Fe

Bolivia:  Cochabamba

Brazil:  Brasilia, Campinas, Florianapolis, Porto 

Alegre

Cape Verde:  Praia

Chile:  Santiago

China:  Shanghai

Colombia:  Bogota, Cartagena

Cote d'Ivoire:  Abidjan

Ecuador:  Guayaquil

Egypt:  Cairo

Estonia:  Tallinn

Finland:  Helsinki

France:  Grenoble, Lille, Marseille

Gabon:  Libreville

Germany:  Rostock

Hungary:  Budapest

India:  New Delhi

Indonesia:  two Trade Points

Kenya:  Nairobi

South Korea:  Seoul

Mauritania:  Nouakchott

Morocco:  Casablanca

Mozambique:  Maputo

Philippines:  Manila

Portugal:  Lisbon, Porto

Russia:  Moscow

Sao Tome and Principe:  Sao Tome

Senegal:  Dakar

Singapore:  Singapore

Switzerland:  Lausanne

Tanzania:  Dar es Salaam

Thailand:  Bangkok

Tunisia:  Tunis

Ukraine:  Kiev

United Kingdom:  London

United States:  Columbus, Ohio

Zambia:  Lusaka    



(###)





[END OF DISPATCH VOL 5, NO 36]

To the top of this page


Index of Dispatch Magazine Archives 1994 Issues|| Index of Dispatch Magazine Archives|| Index of "Briefings and Statements"
Index of Electronic Research Collections ERC Reference Desk || Alphabetic Index || Sitemap || ERC Homepage
Last modified: Jun. 8, 1999