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US DEPARTMENT OF STATE
OFFICE OF THE SPOKESMAN
TAKEN QUESTIONS AT PRESS BRIEFING OF NOVEMBER 3, 1993

1. SOMALIA:  US POLICY ON DISARMING FIGHTERS
Q.  How does the current U.S. policy of support for disarming the
    clans in Somalia square with the Administration's policy last
    spring that U.S. troops would not engage in disarmament
    actions?

A.  Our position on disarmament has not changed.  We have always
    recognized that disarmament should be part of Somalia's
    political reconciliation process.  We have consistently urged
    that the best way to achieve reconciliation is for the Somalis
    themselves to carry out the Addis Ababa Accords, where they
    agreed to disarm.


2. HUNGARY:  MEDIA TURMOIL
Q.  What is your comment on the current turmoil over control of
    Hungary's electronic media?

A.  The situation at Hungarian television and radio is very
    confusing right now with a number of charges and
    counter-charges.

    During Secretary Christopher's recent trip to Budapest, he
    stressed the importance of a free press to democratic societies. 
    He also noted the critical role of television and radio in the
    dissemination of objective information.

    As a matter of policy, we believe all segments of a society
    should have access to the electronic media and that citizens
    have a right to fair, balanced and uncensored news coverage.


3. HAITI:  MISSION OF U.S. SHIP AND TROOPS
Q.  What is the purpose of the U.S. Navy ship and the Marines aboard
    that ship near Haitian water?

A.  The U.S. Navy ship (USS Nassau) currently in international waters
    near Haiti serves as the command and control platform for the
    Joint Task Force Commander, Rear Admiral Gehman, in enforcing
    sanctions on Haiti.

    The approximately 600 U.S. Marines aboard that ship are the
    stand-by force for the mission directed by the President on
    October 16 to protect the lives of U.S. citizens in Haiti
    should the need arise.

4.  HAITI:  SANCTIONS
Q.  Last time there were sanctions against individual Haitians who the
     U.S. deemed to be blocking a return to democracy, there were more
     than the 41 people on the current list.  Why?

A.  The previous list was longer because it included officials of the
     de facto government which was then holding office.  Today’s situation
     is different -- the Haitian Government led by Prime Minister Malval 
     is legitimate and constitutional.  We do not place sanctions against
     him and his appointees.

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