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1993 DAILY PRESS BRIEFING #23: TUESDAY, 2/16/93

Source:         State Department Spokesman Richard Boucher
Description:    Washington, DC
Date:           Feb 16, 1993
Category:       Briefings
Region:         Central Europe, MidEast/North Africa,
                Caribbean, Subsaharan Africa
Country:        Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia-Montenegro,
                Israel, Lebanon, Burma, Thailand,
                Marshall Islands, Haiti, Russia, Albania, Cuba,
                Rwanda, Liberia
Subject:        Regional/Civil Unrest, Military Affairs,
                Development/Relief Aid, United Nations,
                Mideast Peace Process, State Department,
                Arms Control, Travel
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Subject                                                        Page

ANNOUNCEMENT
    Secretary's Trip to Middle East/Europe ......          ...  1-2
    --  Itinerary/Preparation/Prior Trips/Role in
          Camp David Accords .............              ......  1-3
ARMS CONTROL
    U.S.-Russian Discussions on Arms Sales ....           ........  3
FORMER YUGOSLAVIA
    Possible Meeting between Secretary and President
      of Kosovo                     ............................  2
    Ambassador Bartholomew's Visit to Moscow/
      Briefing of U.S. Officials/UN Consultations           ....  3-5
    Vance-Owen Process/U.S. Role ...............................  4-6
    Fighting ...............................       .............  6
    Humanitarian Relief/U.S. Efforts/Aid Refusal             ..  6-11
    --  Flights Suspended           ......................  6,10-11
    --  Convoys Blocked ........................     .........  6-7
    Statement by Jacques Delors ........... .................  9-10
    U.S. Policy on Radovan Karadzic Visa .......  ............  14-15
MIDDLE EAST
    U.S. Contacts with Palestinians .............................  12
    --  Possible Meetings with Secretary before Trip             12
ISRAEL/OCCUPIED TERRITORIES/LEBANON
    Palestinian Deportees/U.S. Terminology ..    .............  12-13
MARSHALL ISLANDS
    Status of Chinese Passengers Aboard Eastwood ..           .  13

HAITI.....         ............................................  16

MISCELLANEOU.S.
    Answered "Taken" Questions from the Media
    --  BURMA/THAILAND:  Visit of Nobel Laureates (Correction)
    --  KOSOVO:  Meetting with Kosovo Albanian Leader
    --  SECRETARY:  Secreatry Christopher's Involvement in Camp David
    --  MIDDLE EAST:  Meetings with Palestinians
    --  ISRAEL:  Deportations
    --  LIBERIA:  Travel Warning and Consular Information Sheet
    --  RWANDA:  Travel Warning and Consular Information Sheet
    Department Statements
    --  CUBA:  Crackdown on Labor Union Leaders
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TEXT

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ANSWERED "TAKEN" QUESTIONS FROM THE MEDIA
As posted in the Press Office, U.S. Department of State
February 16, 1993

BURMA/THAILAND -- VISIT OF NOBEL LAUREATES/CORRECTION

Taken Question: 2/16/93

        Q:  Are there any Americans among the Nobel Peace Prize
laureates who are visiting Thailand as part of an effort to rally
international support for the release from house arrest of Burmese Nobel
Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi?

        A:  WE ARE AWARE OF A PRESS REPORT SAYING THAT "DONNA KYLE
ANDERTON, REPRESENTING THE QUAKER ORGANIZATION THE AMERICAN FRIENDS
SERVICE, WHICH WON THE NOBEL PRIZE IN 1947, CONFIRMED HER PARTICIPATION
(IN THE VISIT) AT THE LAST MINUTE ON MONDAY."

        WE HAVE NO INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATION OF THIS REPORT.  (###)

KOSOVO:  Meeting with Kosovo Albanian Leader Ibrahim Rugova

Taken Question:  2/16/93

        Q:  Is the Secretary meeting with the leader of the Kosovo
ethnic Albanians, Rugova?  If not, why not?

        A:  SECRETARY CHRISTOPHER IS NOT MEETING WITH KOSOVO LEADER
IBRAHIM RUGOVA DURING HIS TRIP TO WASHINGTON.  THE SECRETARY'S SCHEDULE,
GIVEN HIS IMMINENT DEPARTURE FOR THE MIDDLE EAST, IS PARTICULARLY FULL
AT THIS TIME.  DR. RUGOVA IS MEETING WITH ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE
FOR EUROPEAN AND CANADIAN AFFAIRS, THOMAS M.T. NILES, AT 4:30 PM THIS
AFTERNOON. DR. RUGOVA AND AMBASSADOR NILES WILL DISCU.S.S THE U.S.
APPROACH TO THE CONFLICT IN THE FORMER YUGOSLAVIA, AS WELL AS CURRENT
CONDITIONS IN KOSOVO.

        IT REMAINS THE U.S. POSITION THAT THE GOVERNMENT OF SERBIA
SHOULD RESTORE KOSOVO'S AUTONOMY AND THE INSTITUTIONS WHICH REFLECT THAT
AUTONOMY AND CEASE ALL FORMS OF REPRESSION AND U.S.E OF FORCE IN KOSOVO.
AS SECRETARY CHRISTOPHER SAID ON FEBRUARY 10 WHEN HE ANNOUNCED THE
ADMINISTRATION'S APPROACH REGARDING THE CONFLICT IN THE FORMER
YUGOSLAVIA "WE REMAIN PREPARED TO RESPOND AGAINST THE SERBIANS IN THE
EVENT OF A CONFLICT IN KOSOVO CAU.S.ED BY SERBIAN ACTION."  (###)

SECRETARY:  Involvement in Camp David

Taken Question:  2/16/93

        Q:  What was Secretary Christopher's involvement in the Camp
David negotiations and did he ever make a trip to the Middle East while
serving as Deputy Secretary?

        A:  SECRETARY CHRISTOPHER TRAVELLED TO EGYPT, SAUDI ARABIA, AND
AMMAN AS WELL AS SEVERAL EUROPEAN CAPITALS IN MARCH 1979 TO BRIEF THOSE
GOVERNMENTS ON THE CAMP DAVID AGREEMENTS.

        LATER HE TRAVELLED TO ALGERIA WHERE HE SUCCESSFULLY NEGOTIATED
THE RELEASE OF OUR HOSTAGES HELD IN TEHRAN.  (###)

MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS:  Meetings with Palestinians

Taken Question: 2/16/93

        Q:  Are there any other scheduled meetings with Palestinian
representatives before the Secretary departs on his trip?

        A:  No.

ISRAEL:  Israeli Deportations

Taken Question: 2/16/93

        Q:  Why does the United States use the term "Deportees" to
refer to the Palestinians forced by Israel from the Occupied
Territories?  Is there a legal reason not to call them "expellees?"

        A:  AS WE HAVE SAID PREVIOU.S.LY, ARTICLE 49 OF THE FOURTH
GENEVA
CONVENTION RELATING TO THE PROTECTION OF CIVILIAN PERSONS IN THE TIME OF
WAR, SECTION III, ENTITLED OCCUPIED TERRITORIES, COVERS "INDIVIDUAL OR
MASS FORCIBLE TRANSFERS, AS WELL AS DEPORTATIONS OF PROTECTED PERSONS."
IT IS CLEARLY MEANT TO COVER COMPULSORY MOVEMENT OF PROTECTED PERSONS
AND DOES NOT LIMIT ITS APPLICATION TO DEFINITIONS OF DEPORTATION IN THE
LAWS OF VARIOU.S. STATES.  (###)


DEPARTMENT STATEMENT
As posted in the Press Office, U.S. Department of State
February 16, 1993

CUBA:  Crackdown on Labor Union Leaders

Statement 2/16/93

        The United States is concerned about the Cuban Government's
treatment of Cuba's nascent free trade unions.  Free trade union leaders
Juan Guarino, Javier Troncoso, Jorge Bonet, Eduardo Rois, Roberto
Trobjo, Leonardo Varo, Omar Fernandex, and Lazaro Corp were detained by
police on February 5 while they met to discuss details of the merger of
the unions they represent.  Police reportedly threatened them if they
continued their free union activities.  All were issued a written
warning and released at 3 a.m. the following day.

        On February 6, Rafael Gutierrez Santos, head of the Labor Union
of Cuban Workers, was arrested by plainsclothes security agents.  He is
being held incomunicado, in violation of Cuban law, at state security
headquarters.

        Cuba has ignored International Labor Organization (ILO)
criticisms of its abuse of worker rights.  The ILO reminded Cuba in 1992
that arresting trade unionists without a warrant or when no grounds for
conviction exist is a violation of trade union rights; concluded that
Cuba violates ILO norms on freedom of association and the right to
organize; and found that Cuban Government restrictions on the freedom to
choose or change employment are incompatible with ILO conventions
prohibiting forced labor.

        We call on the Cuban Government to release Mr. Guitierrez
without delay, to comply with the conclusions of the ILO, and to permit
free trade unions to register legally and operate freely and
independently for the benefit of Cuban workers.  (###)

LIBERIA:  Travel Warning and Consular Information Sheet

Travel Warning (93-012) and Information Sheet No. 93-048
Bureau of Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State
Released 2/16/93

WARNING:  U.S. citizens are warned against travel to Liberia
because of the ongoing civil war.  In January 1993 a security buffer
around Monrovia was re-established by forces of the West African Peace
Monitoring Group.  Roads leading out from Monrovia are not open for
travel except for very limited pre-approved trips into Cape Mount and
Bomi counties.  Travelers to the interior of Liberia may be in danger of
being detained, harassed, delayed, injured or killed.  The Department of
State has removed the evacuation order for U.S. Embassy employees and
dependents.  (This replaces the Warning dated December 24, 1992, to
reflect the re-establishment of a security buffer around Monrovia and
the removal of evacuation status for U.S. Embassy employees and
dependents.)

EMBASSY LOCATION:  The U.S. Embassy is located in Monrovia at 111
United Nations Drive.  Telephone numbers are (231) 222991 through
222994.  The Embassy's mailing address is P.O. Box 10-0098, Mamba Point,
Monrovia, or APO AE 09813.

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:  Liberia is a developing west African
country which has suffered high internal strife for the past several
years.  Tourism facilities are poor, and in some cases non-existent.

AREAS OF INSTABILITY:  The current situation in Liberia changes
on almost a day-to-day basis. A security buffer around Monrovia was re-
established in January 1993; however, tensions are high throughout the
country and widespread hostilities exist.  The roads leading from
Monrovia are closed except for very limited pre-approved travel into
Cape Mount and Bomi counties.  U.S. Embassy employees are not allowed to
travel outside Monrovia or its immediate environs.  Travelers, including
U.S. citizens, have been detained, harassed and delayed by forces of the
National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL).   Five U.S. citizen nuns
were killed in Gardnersville by NPFL Troops in October 1992.  Roberts
International Airport outside of Monrovia is closed.  Limited air
service exists only between Spriggs Payne Field in Monrovia and Abidjan,
Cote D'Ivoire, and Freetown, Sierra Leone.  No major international air
carrier serves Spriggs Payne Field.  Overland routes to other West
African countries are not open.  A curfew is strictly enforced in
Monrovia.

COUNTRY INFRASTRUCTURE:  Lodging, water, electricity, fuel,
transportation, telephone and postal services continue to be disrupted
in Monrovia.  Such services are nonexistent or severely limited in rural
areas.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:  Travelers who, despite this warning,
continue to plan a trip to Liberia, are required to have a passport and
a visa obtained prior to arrival.  Evidence of cholera and yellow fever
vaccinations are required.  An exit permit must be obtained from
Liberian immigration authorities upon arrival. Further information on
entry requirements for Liberia can be obtained from the Embassy of the
Republic of Liberia, 5201 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20011.  The
telephone numbers are (202) 723-0437 to 723-0440.

MEDICAL FACILITIES:  Medical facilities have been disrupted.
Medicines are scarce.

INFORMATION ON CRIME:  Foreigners in Monrovia, including U.S.
citizens, have been targets of street crime.  Residential breaking and
entering is common.  The police are largely incapable of providing
effective protection.

MAIL SERVICE:  Mail delivery is erratic for both international
mail and when using APO.  Parcel delivery service is available to
Monrovia.

DRUG PENALTIES:  Penalties for possession, use and trafficking in
illegal drugs are strict, and convicted offenders can expect jail
sentences and fines.

TIPS FOR TRAVELERS:  General information on travel to the area
can be obtained from the Department of State Publication, "Tips for
Travelers To Sub-Saharan Africa."  It is available from the
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington
D.C.  20402.

REGISTRATION:  U.S. citizens who register at the U.S. Embassy in
Monrovia can obtain updated information on travel and security.   At the
present time, however, consular assistance is limited by unrest in the
country.

No. 93-048

This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated December 24, 1992, to
reflect the re-establishment of a security buffer around Monrovia and to
reflect the cancellation of evacuation status for U.S. Embassy employees
and dependents.  Additional information on areas of instability has also
been added.  (###)

[For recorded travel information, call 202-647-5225.  To access the
computerized Consular Affairs Bulletin Board, call 202-647-9225.]

RWANDA:  Travel Warning and Consular Information Sheet

Travel Warning (93-011) and Consular Information Sheet (93-047)
Bureau of Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State
Released 2/16/93

WARNING:  The Department of State warns all U.S. citizens against
travel to Rwanda because of intense fighting between political parties
and ethnic groups.  The civil unrest has resulted in demonstrations,
road blockages and violence, including bombings throughout Rwanda. (No.
93-011)

EMBASSY LOCATION:  The U.S. Embassy in Rwanda is located in the
capital city of Kigali at Boulevard de la Revolution, B.P. 28.  The
telephone number is (250) 75601/2/3.

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:  Rwanda is an east African country with a
developing economy.  Tourist facilities, except in the capital city of
Kigali and in game parks, may be limited.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:  A passport and a visa are required in order
to enter the country.  Visas can be obtained from any Rwandan Embassy or
Consulate.  A $15 fee is required for a multiple-entry visa with a stay
of up to three months in duration; two application forms, two photos and
evidence of yellow fever immunization also must be presented.  Further
information on entry requirements can be obtained at the Embassy of the
Republic of Rwanda at 1714 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. in Washington,
D.C. 20009, telephone (202) 232-2882.

AREAS OF INSTABILITY:  Rwanda has been engaged in hostilities
with an armed rebel force composed of Rwandan exiles from neighboring
Uganda since October 1990.  The situation in northern Rwanda, especially
in Ruhengeri and Byumba prefectures, is extremely hazardous due to
outbreaks of violence between political parties and ethnic groups.  Many
deaths have occurred as a result of this violence.  The area just east
of Volcano National Park, home of Rwanda's famed mountain gorillas,
eastward to the edge of Akagera Game Park, is not accessible to
tourists.  Travel to Akagera Game Park is also hazardous.

TERRORIST ACTIVITIES:  Terrorist acts have been committed in the
past using anti-personnel and anti-vehicle mines.  Bombs, including
timed explosives, have been placed in minibuses used for public
transportation, hotels and at least one night club.  These attacks have
not been directed at American citizens or installations and appear to be
the result of the increasingly volatile political situation in the
country.  The unpredictable nature and locale of the attacks places all
visitors in Rwanda at risk.

MEDICAL FACILITIES:  Medical facilities are limited.  Medicine is
often in short supply.  Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate
cash payment for health services.  U.S. medical insurance is not always
valid outside the United States.  Supplementary medical insurance with
specific overseas coverage has proved useful.  Questions on health
matters can be referred to the Centers for Disease Control's
International Travelers Hotline at (404) 332-4559.

INFORMATION ON CRIME:  There have been armed robberies and
attacks on residents of the capital city of Kigali in which guns,
machetes and hand grenades were used.  Petty street crimes also occur.
Useful information on safeguarding valuables and protecting personal
security while traveling abroad is provided in the pamphlet, "A Safe
Trip Abroad," and is available from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.

CURFEW:  A curfew is in effect in most of the country from 1:00
a.m. to 5:00 a.m.  The curfew in Ruhengeri and Gisenyi prefectures,
where the Volcano National Park is located, is from 8:00 p.m. to 5:00
a.m.  Additional curfews are declared in areas affected by fighting,
ethnic violence, or conflict between rival political groups.  Road
blocks and checkpoints controlled by the military are in effect in
Kigali and through the country.

DRUG PENALTIES:  Penalties for possession, use and trafficking in
illegal drugs are strict, and convicted offenders can expect lengthy
jail sentences and fines.

TIPS FOR TRAVELERS:  Further information on travel to the area is
available in the Department of State pamphlet, "Tips for Travelers to
Sub-Saharan Africa," which is available on this CD-ROM and in print from
the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402.

REGISTRATION:  U.S. citizens who cannot avoid travel to Rwanda
are strongly urged to contact the U.S. Embassy to register and obtain
updated information on travel and security within Rwanda.

No. 93-047:  This replaces the Consular Information Sheet issued January
29, 1993, to add the warning to U.S. citizens to avoid travel to Rwanda
due to intense fighting.  [For recorded travel information, call 202-
647-5225.  To access the computerized Consular Affairs Bulletin Board,
call 202-647-9225.]  (###)

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