Return to: Index of 1993 Daily Briefings || Electronic Research Collections Index || ERC Homepage

Note: This Electronic Research Collection is an archive site. For the most current information, please visit the US State Department Homepage.
1993 DAILY PRESS BRIEFING #22: FRIDAY, 2/12/93

Source:         State Department Spokesman Richard Boucher
Description:    Washington, DC
Date:           Feb 12, 1993
Category:       Briefings
Region:         Central Europe, MidEast/North Africa,
                East Asia, Europe, Eurasia, Central America,
                South Asia
Country:        Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia-Montenegro,
                Somalia, Israel, Iraq, Lebanon, Germany, Japan,
                China, Russia, Guatemala, Afghanistan
Subject:        Regional/Civil Unrest, Military Affairs,
                Development/Relief Aid, United Nations,
                Mideast Peace Process, Terrorism, Trade/Economics,
                Travel, Resource Management
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject                                                       Page

ANNOUNCEMENT
No Press Briefing on Feb. 15 Due to Holiday    ................. 1

ISRAEL/OCCUPIED TERRITORIES/LEBANON
Palestinian Deportees   .................................. 1-5,7-8
--  Israeli Foreign Minister's Meeting at UN  ................ 2-4
Report Iraq Desires to Sell Oil to Aid Palestinians ............ 9

MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS
U.S. Efforts to Reinvigorate Talks        .................... 3,5-7
Secretary's Trip to Region ............................. 2-3,6-7,9
Asst. Sec. Djerejian Meetings with Hanan Ashrawi ............. 5-7
U.S. Loan Guarantees/Conditions         .......................... 8

IRAQ
Report GoI Desire to Sell Oil for Palestinians ................. 9

FORMER YUGOSLAVIA
Fighting/Upsurge  ............................................. 10
--  French UNPROFOR Casualties           ................... 10-11
--  Prospects for Withdrawing UNPROFOR ..........  ............ 11
Humanitarian Airlift Resumes       ............................ 10
Radovan Karadzic  Departs U.S. ..........   ..................... 12
Distribution of Humanitarian Aid/Problems in
      East/U.S. Deplores Blocking      ....................... 12-14

GERMANY/TERRORISM
Hijacked Airliner Diverted to U.S./U.S. Contacts ...   ......... 14-15
--  No Take-Off Rule ...............................

JAPAN
Secretary's Meeting with FM Watanabe         ............... 15-16

DEPARTMENT
Agreement with Whistle Blower .............................. 16-17

SOMALIA
Ambassador Oakley's Tenure   .................................. 17

MISCELLANEOU.S.
Anwered "Taken" Questions from the Media
--  TOGO:  Further Aid Cut
--  JAPAN:  Readout on Christopher-Watanabe Bilateral
--  AFGHANISTAN:  Travel Warning
Department Statement
--  GUATEMALA:  Mack Verdict

-------------------------------------------------------------------
TEXT

-------------------------------------------------------------------

ANSWERED "TAKEN" QUESTIONS FROM THE MEDIA
As posted in the Press Office, U.S. Department of State
February 12, 1993

TOGO:  Further Aid Cut

Taken Question - 2/12/93

        Q:  The French and Germans have announced suspension of aid
to Togo.  Is the U.S. taking similar action?

        A:  YES.  THE UNITED STATES IS SU.S.PENDING ONGOING ASSISTANCE
PROJECTS WITH TOGO EXCEPT THOSE WHICH DIRECTLY BENEFIT PEOPLE MOST IN
NEED.

        Q:  How will the aid program be cut?

        A:  APPROXIMATELY $3.5 MILLION INTENDED FOR THE HEALTH SECTOR,
TRAINING, AND NEW SCHOLARSHIPS WILL BE SU.S.PENDED.  THE SU.S.PENSION
WILL
LAST UNTIL FURTHER REVIEW.

        HUMANITARIAN AND EMERGENCY RELIEF INCLUDING $4.1 MILLION IN
FOODSTUFFS UNDER THE PL-480 TITLE II PROGRAM WILL CONTINUE,
ADMINISTERED THROUGH PRIVATE AGENCIES SUCH AS CARE AND CATHOLIC RELIEF
SERVICES.  WE WILL MAINTAIN THE ESSENCE OF A HEALTH SECTOR PROJECT
ALTHOUGH NEW FUNDS WILL NOT BE ADDED.  ASSISTANCE TO SMALL FARMERS
THROUGH THE MEMBER-OWNED RURAL CREDIT UNION MOVEMENT WILL ALSO
CONTINUE.  SCHOLARSHIPS UNDER THE ATLAS PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS ALREADY IN
THE U.S. WILL NOT BE AFFECTED BUT NO NEW STUDENTS WILL BE SENT.

        Q:  Why is the United States suspending aid to Togo?

        A:  THE AID SU.S.PENSION IS A DIRECT RESPONSE TO RECENT ACTS OF
VIOLENCE BY TOGOLESE SECURITY FORCES AGAINST CIVILIANS, CONTINUED
EFFORTS BY THESE SAME FORCES TO INTIMIDATE THE OPPOSITION AND UNDERMINE
TOGO'S TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY AND, MOST RECENTLY, THE BREAKDOWN OF
FRANCO-GERMAN BROKERED NEGOTIATIONS IN COLMAR, FRANCE, BETWEEN
REPRESENTATIVES OF ALL INTERESTED PARTIES.  (###)

JAPAN:  Readout on Christopher-Watanabe Bilateral

Taken Question: 2/12/93

        Q:  Can you give us a read-out of the meeting between
Secretary Christopher and Japanese Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe?
Did the subject of a seat for Japan on the  U.N. Security Council come
up?

        A:  Secretary Christopher met with Japanese Foreign Minister
Watanabe for one hour and continued discussion over lunch.  National
Security Advisor Lake and U.S.TR Kantor also participated in the lunch.

Bilateral Relations

        The Secretary stressed the importance the U.S. attached to its
relationship with Japan and our commitment to enhancing our cooperation
on global as well as bilateral issues. Minister Watanabe welcomed this
reaffirmation and said his government was committed to Japan's alliance
with the U.S.  He called for continued close dialogue, and said that
long-term vision would ensure that the U.S.-Japan relationship would be
a
stable one.  The Secretary stressed the importance of the U.S.-Japan
security relationship as the foundation of our relationship.  With the
end of the Cold War and increasing regional instabilities, our
relationship has become more, not less important.  Both agreed that the
U.S. military presence is welcomed in Asia and agreed on the need to
maintain close consultations on security issues.

        On Russia, the Secretary reconfirmed U.S. support for Japan's
position on the Northern Territories issue.  The Minister explained it
is not Japan's policy to link an invitation to Yeltsin to attend the G-7
summit in Tokyo to the Northern Territories issue, and said that
inviting Yeltsin is not a matter for Japan alone to decide but rather
for the entire G-7.  Both sides agreed on the importance of continuing
to support reform in Russia, and agreed to consult closely on how best
to support the transition in the former Soviet Union.

        On China, the U.S. side said it did not intend to isolate China,
noting there had been significant progress in the economic area but
expressing our continued concern over China's performance on trade,
human rights and nonproliferation.  Both sides agreed on the need to do
what we can to help political reforms catch up with economic reforms and
to continue their dialogue on this issue.

        On trade, the Secretary expressed our strong concern about
Japan's growing global and bilateral imbalances, noting the growing
criticism from the American people on this issue.  The Minister
acknowledged this problem but said Japan's recession had contributed to
the deterioration of these imbalances. He said Japan would continue to
make efforts to stimulate its economy to help correct these imbalances.
The Secretary noted that the U.S. is taking steps to increase its
competitiveness, and called for Japan to open its markets further.  The
Secretary added while we would not want this one aspect of our
relationship to overshadow the many areas where we work together on
global, bilateral and regional issues, it was important that there be
urgent action on these economic issues.

        On the Uruguay Round, both sides agreed on the necessity to lead
the Uruguay Round to an early and successful conclusion.  Noting the
problems associated with the agricultural issue and the particular
sensitivity of rice in Japan, the Minister expressed his hope that any
solution on agriculture would be reached in conjunction with resolution
of the difficult issues.  The U.S. side urged Japan to become a full
partner in the Uruguay Round and noted that in the U.S. rice had become
a symbol of Japan's unwillingness to open its market.  The U.S. side 
noted
the President's decision to seek fast track authority and emphasized the
need for progress on market access and services.  With respect to
timing, the U.S. side said that a good agreement was more important than
a quick agreement.

        On civil aviation, the Secretary expressed concerns about the
position taken by Japan on restricting the rights of U.S. carriers to
carry passengers to and from third countries through Japan.  The
Minister responded that "beyond rights" was a fundamental issue that
should be dealt with through negotiations by the two governments.

        There was no discussion of the UN Security Council.  (###)


DEPARTMENT STATEMENTS
As posted in the Press Office, U.S. Department of State
February 12, 1993

GUATEMALA:  Mack Verdict

Statement by Richard Boucher, Spokesman
February 12, 1993

        We welcome the conclusion of the trail of Noel de Jesus Beteta,
Guatemalan senior sergeant, for two murders, including the 1990 murder
of anthropologist Myrna Mack Chang.  Beteta was sentenced to a total of
30 years in prison for the two murders.

        We are pleased that Guatemala's justice system acted vigorously
to prosecute and bring convictions for brutal human rights violations
involving a former member of the security forces.  We hope the
Guatemalan courts will demonstrate similar courage in other cases, such
as the murder of U.S. citizen Michael Devine.

        We deplore anonymous threats against witnesses in this case.
The international community is concerned about their welfare and will
continue to closely observe the situation.

        We salute Helen Mack Chang, Myrna's sister, and other members of
her family for the tenacious and courageous struggle they have waged for
justice in this case.  (###)

AFGHANISTAN:  Travel Warning

Travel Warning, 2/12/93
Bureau of Consular Affairs

        The Department of State warns all U.S. citizens against travel
to Afghanistan.  Westerners remain vulnerable to politically and
criminally-motivated attacks and violence, including robbery, kidnapping
and hostage-taking.  Land mines are still prevalent throughout the
countryside.  All U.S. personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul were
evacuated in 1989, and no other diplomatic mission represents U.S.
interests or provides consular services.  More information can be found
in the Department of State consular information sheet on Afghanistan.

No. 93-009

This replaces the Department of State Travel Warning of January 8, 1993
to clarify the status of the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan.   [For
recorded travel information, call 202-647-5225. To access the Consular
Affairs Bulletin Board (on computer), call 202-647-9225.](###)

___________________________________________________________________

The State Department does not guarantee the authenticity of electronic
documents.  If you require the original version of a document in hard
copy, please contact the Office of Public Communication, Bureau of
Public Affairs, Room 6805, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC
20520.  Telephone: 202-647-5760.  State Department information is not
copyrighted unless indicated and can be reproduced without consent.
Citation of source is appreciated. Permission to reproduce any
copyrighted material (including photos or graphics) must be obtained
from the original source.
_____________________________________________________________ (###)

To the top of this page