Defense Trade News, v.4 n. 01-02  Return to: Index of Defense Trade News Archives || Electronic Research Collections Index || ERC Homepage


US DEPARTMENT OF STATE
DEFENSE TRADE NEWS
THE BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR DEFENSE TRADE
Volume 4, Numbers 1 and 2
January and April 1993

CONTENTS:
Features
1.  DTAG Holds Meetings -- Defense Trade Advisory Group Discusses Coming 
Year's Activities
2.  New  Defense Trade Policies -- Sudan, Cyprus, South Africa's 
"Homelands", Somalia, Yemen, Liberia and Anti-Personnel Mines 
Subject to U.S. Policy 
3.  Notifying Congress -- Update on the Congressional Notification 
Process and Special Handling of "Hill" Cases
4.  NATO E-3A Related License Applications -- Special Procedures 
for NATO AEW Program
5.  Rolled Bars and Ammunition Penetrator Blanks -- Differences 
Defined and Legislation Discussed
6.  DOS Reorganizes Export Control -- Department of State to 
Consolidfate Export Control Policy and Operations in One Bureau
7.  Advisory Opinions -- Procedure to Determine Likelihood of 
Export Approval
8.  Your Current License Status -- DTC Licensing Division Staff 
Aides Provide Information
9.  OMB Approves Revised Munitions Application Forms -- Less 
Paperwork, Easier to Prepare
10.  A Guide to Visiting DTC-- Dining and Lodging in the Rosslyn 
Area
11.  Where in the World Is It?-- Using DOS Geographic Regions to 
Speed Licensing

Departments
12.  US Customs at DTC - The Automated Export System
13.  Commodity Jurisdictions
14.  Personnel Updates & Category Assignments
15.  Tips and Tidbits
16.  Publications for Exporters - Cross Reference of Countries and 
Bureaus
17.  Reader Questionnaire & Training Form 

ARTICLE 1:
DTAG Holds  Meetings
Defense Trade Advisory Group Discusses Coming Year's Activities

Ed's Note:   For additional information on the DTAG, see 3 related 
articles in the October 1992 issue; "Defense Trade Advisory 
Group", "Partnership of Concerns", and "DTAG Leadership".

DTAG holds two meetings.  The Defense Trade Advisory Group  
(DTAG), a formal State Department advisory committee established 
in February 1992, recently held two meetings.  The fall meeting 
was the second one for the advisory group, and the winter one, the 
third meeting.   

The Fall Meeting
The DTAG held its second meeting on October 14, 1992 , at the 
National Defense University in Washington, DC.  Attendees included 
private sector DTAG members as well as observers from the 
Departments of Commerce, Defense, Justice, the Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency  (ACDA), U.S.  Customs, and numerous U.S. 
defense firms.

Assistant Secretary of State for Political Military Affairs Robert 
L. Gallucci gave the opening address.  He urged industry to 
support the State Department's efforts to reduce proliferation, 
prevent arms diversions, and lower armaments levels to enhance 
worldwide and regional stability.  Recognizing that the defense 
industry must remain competitive in order to sustain a strong U.S. 
defense industrial base, the Department will continue to support 
arms sales which advance our security and foreign policy 
interests.  

After the opening remarks, DTAG members adjourned into the Policy, 
Regulatory, and Technical Working Groups.  DTAG Chairman William 
Schneider encouraged committee members to develop recommendations 
in time for the FY94 budget authorization.  Each working group 
focussed on activities for the coming year.

The Policy Working Group (PWG).  Led by Schneider, the PWG offered 
a number of recommendations which it asked the U.S. Government to 
consider.  The following suggestions were considered to be among 
the most important:

  --  Foreign availability should be considered when reviewing 
export requests.
  --  The Foreign Commercial  Service (FCS) should be utilized 
more to  facilitate U.S. arms sales abroad.
  --  The cable on support for defense companies issued by then 
Deputy Secretary Eagleburger in July 1990, should be revised and 
retransmitted.
  --  The U.S. Government should review its policy on weapons 
upgrades and releasability of US technology to Eastern Europe.

Longer term issues that the PWG intends to consider include:

  --  Retransfers.
  --  Globalization of the defense industry.
  --  Defense export financing.
  --  Offsets.
  --  Reducing national market barriers to US munitions exports.
  --  Expediting Congressional notification of non-controversial 
arms sales.
  --  Determining appropriate support for international trade 
shows.

The Regulatory Working Group (RWG).  This committee established a 
number of task forces to consider subjects for the next one and 
two years.  Each task force will provide background  papers.  RWG  
consensus  is needed before a background paper can be passed to 
the DTAG Secretariat for dissemination to the entire DTAG 
membership.  The following subjects will be considered over the 
next year:

  --  The Commodity jurisdiction process.
  --  Third country transfers.
  --  Compliance procedures.
  --  Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) Day in Court 
procedures.

The following items made up the RWG Two-Year Work Plan:

  --  Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms multiple licensing 
activities.
  --  Revising ITAR detention and seizure procedures.
  --  Reviewing various ITAR exemptions for proscribed countries.
  --  Upgrading DTC administrative functions.

The Technical Working Group  (TWG).  This group focussed on six 
commodities to determine whether they should be on the U.S. 
Munitions List (USML) or on the Commerce Department's  Commodity  
Control  List (CCL).   The specific items were:

  --  Hot sections.
  --  Commercial development aircraft.
  --  Encryption devices.
  --  Satellite technology.
  --  Software source codes.
  --  Space items.

The TWG agreed to defer discussing commercial development aircraft 
until it made recommendations on the hot sections issue.  As 
government studies are underway on encryption, software source 
codes and  satellites, the group will wait for results to be 
reported before making recommendations on these items.  John 
Walsh, chairman of the TWG, asked several committee members to 
prepare studies on hot sections and software source codes.

The Winter Meeting
The third meeting of the Defense Trade Advisory Group (DTAG) took 
place on February 2, 1993,  in the State Department's Loy 
Henderson Auditorium.   Robert L. Gallucci, Assistant Secretary of 
State for Political Military Affairs, introduced Under Secretary  
Designate Lynn Davis.  PM Deputy Assistant Secretary Rand Beers 
and Office of Defense Trade Policy  (DTP) Director Michael Newlin 
were also present.  In his keynote address, Mr. Gallucci commented 
on USG assistance to the U.S. defense industry and the non-
proliferation goals of the Clinton Administration.  After the 
keynote speakers,  DTAG members  adjourned into Working Groups and 
reviewed their progress to date and made recommendations.

The Policy Working Group (PWG).  This committee established 
subcommittees on Arms Control, New Initiatives, and Globalization 
of the Defense Industry.  It asked for publication of the new ITAR 
and a reaffirmation of the 1990 Eagleburger directive on 
facilitating legitimate U.S. defense exports.

The Regulatory Working Group (RWG).  This working group has task 
forces on Automation of the Licensing Process, a DTC Day-in-Court, 
Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), Commodity Jurisdiction 
(CJ), Third Country Transfers, and Compliance.  RWG 
recommendations included expanding the capabilities of the Remote 
On-line Bulletin Board (ROBB); making licensing forms more user-
friendly; instituting a DTC appeals process for disapproved 
license applications; establishing a review process for MTCR 
cases; working towards greater transparency regarding DTC CJ 
decisions; clarifying the definition of an empowered/delegated 
official; and reviewing State's policy towards persons indicted or 
ineligible to conduct business with the U.S. Government.

The Technical Working Group (TWG).   This group is examining 
whether specific technologies, including jet engine hot sections 
and software source code, should be under State or Commerce 
control. 

Point of Contact.  To receive additional information about the 
DTAG and its upcoming meetings, contact Linda Lum at the Office of  
Defense Trade Policy (DTP) at (202) 647-4231, datafax (202) 647-
4232. (###)


ARTICLE 2:

New Defense Trade Policies
Sudan, Cyprus, South Africa's "Homelands", Somalia, Yemen, Liberia  
and Anti-Personnel Mines Subject to U.S. Policy

Exports to Sudan Suspended
In a Federal Register Notice, Vol. 57, Page 4974, November 3, 
1992, it was noticed that all Department of State licenses and 
other approvals to export or otherwise transfer defense articles 
or defense services to Sudan are suspended until further notice.  
Effective October 8, 1992, it is the policy of the Department of 
State to deny all applications for licenses and other approvals to 
export or otherwise transfer defense articles or defense services 
to Sudan.  This action also precludes using any exemptions from 
licensing or other approval requirements included in the ITAR in 
connection with Sudan.  Also, foreign assistance to Sudan other 
than humanitarian assistance, was suspended pursuant to  513 of 
the Foreign Operations Authorization Act which mandates suspension 
of assistance following a military coup.  Exceptions to this 
policy, particularly for non-lethal items will be considered on a 
case-by-case basis.

Exports to Cyprus Denied 
Effective November 18, 1992, it is the policy of the U.S. 
Government to deny all Department of State applications for 
licenses and other approvals to export or otherwise transfer 
defense articles or defense services to any of the armed forces on 
Cyprus, with the exception of the United Nations Forces in Cyprus 
(UNFICYP).   Such exports are opposed because of their ability to 
contribute to an arms race on the island and hinder United Nations 
and U.S.  efforts to reach a fair and permanent settlement of the 
Cyprus dispute.  This action does not affect exports of defense 
articles or services for civilian end-users on Cyprus. This action 
also precludes any exemptions from licensing or other approval 
requirements included in the ITAR  for Cyprus [Vol. 57 Federal 
Register, page 60265 (December 18, 1992)].

South   Africa's  "Independent" Homelands Not Recognized
The U.S.  Government does not recognize South Africa's so called 
"independent" homelands of Bophuthatswana, Ciskei, Transkei and 
Venda.  These entities are considered to be part of the Republic 
of South Africa.   As a consequence, exports to any of these areas 
are subject to the arms embargo imposed against South Africa by 
the UN Security Council in resolution 418 on November 4, 1977.  
Exports destined for the homelands should reflect South Africa as 
the 'country of ultimate destination'.

Exports to Somalia Suspended
In a  Federal Register Notice, Vol. 57,  Page 59851, December 16, 
1992, it was noticed that all Department of State licenses and 
other approvals to export or otherwise transfer defense articles 
or defense services to Somalia are suspended until further notice. 
Effective December 16, 1992, it is the policy of the Department of 
State to deny all applications for licenses and other approvals to 
export or otherwise transfer defense articles or defense services 
to Somalia.  This action has  been taken in accordance with UN 
Security Council Resolution 733 instituting a general complete 
embargo on all deliveries of weapons and military equipment to 
Somalia.  

This action also precludes using any exemptions from licensing or 
other ITAR approval requirements in connection with Somalia. 

Exports to Yemen
In a  Federal Register Notice,  Vol. 57,  Page 59852, December 16, 
1992, it was noticed that effective November 16, 1992, all 
Department of State license applications and other written 
requests for approvals to export or otherwise transfer defense 
articles or defense services to Yemen are being reviewed on a more 
scrutinized case-by-case basis, with a presumption of denial for 
lethal articles or items supporting such articles.  Approvals for 
export of defense articles or defense services bound for Yemen 
will be considered primarily for non-lethal defense articles or 
defense services.

For the purposes of this policy, "nonlethal defense articles" 
means an article that is not a weapon, ammunition, or other 
equipment or material that is designed to inflict serious bodily 
harm or death (see e.g., 10 U.S.C.  2547).

Exports to Liberia Suspended
In a  Federal Register Notice, Vol. 57,  Page 60265, December 18, 
1992, it was noticed that all Department of State licenses and 
other approvals to export or otherwise transfer defense articles 
or defense services to Liberia,  other than articles or services 
destined for the sole  use of  the peace-keeping forces of ECOWAS, 
are suspended until further notice.

Effective December 18, 1992, it is the policy of the Department of 
State to deny all applications for licenses and other approvals to 
export or otherwise transfer defense articles or defense services 
to Liberia. This action has been taken in accordance with UN 
Security Council Resolution 788 instituting a general complete 
embargo on all deliveries of weapons and military equipment to 
Liberia. This action does not apply to weapons and military 
equipment destined for the sole use of the peace-keeping forces of 
ECOWAS  in Liberia, including weapons and military equipment 
destined for constituent members of the ECOWAS peace-keeping 
forces. This action also precludes using any exemptions from 
licensing or other approval  requirements included in the ITAR for 
Liberia.

Moratorium on Anti-Personnel Mines
On October 23, 1992, the President signed into law the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 (Public Law 102-
484).  Section 1365 of that Act contains a statutory moratorium on 
transfers of anti-personnel landmines to foreign nations.  
Effective with the signing of the Act, it is the policy of the 
U.S. Government to deny all applications for licenses and other 
approvals to export or otherwise transfer anti-personnel landmines 
to foreign persons or foreign nations. In addition, all previously 
issued licenses and other approvals for the export, sale, or other 
transfer of anti-personnel landmines have been revoked or 
suspended.  This prohibition remains in effect until further 
notice. 

Point of Contact.  For further information contact:  Clyde G. 
Bryant, Jr., Chief, Compliance Analysis Division, Office of 
Defense Trade Controls, Bureau of Political Military Affairs, U.S. 
Department of State, Washington, D.C.  20522-0602, Phone (703) 
875-6650.  (###)


ARTICLE 3:

Notifying Congress
Update on the Congressional Notification Process and Special 
Handling of "Hill" Cases

The Arms Export Control Act (AECA) of 1976 requires the President 
to notify the Congress of certain commercial defense trade export 
applications  prior to their  approval.  The President's authority 
has been delegated to the Secretary of State.  Sections 36(c) and 
36(d) of the AECA specifically delineate which cases submitted to 
the Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) require Congressional 
notification.

36(c) cases. Section 36(c) generally covers the following two 
types of license applications:

  --  All exports of defense articles or services sold under a 
contract in the amount of $50 million or more; and

  --  All exports of Major Defense Equipment (MDE) sold under a 
contract in the amount of $14 million or more.

AECA Section 47(6) defines MDE as Significant Military Equipment 
(SME) having a one-time research and development cost to the U.S. 
Government of $50 million or more, or a total U.S. Government 
procurement cost of $200 million or more.  [The Defense Security 
Assistance Agency (DSAA) at the Department of Defense maintains a 
list of the defense articles categorized as MDE.] This definition 
will also be added to part 120 of the revised International 
Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) when the final rule change is 
published in the Federal Register.  [For completeness, it should 
be noted some retransfers - e.g., sale of U.S. defense articles by 
the 	licensed recipient country to another country of MDE valued 
at $14 million or more, or of defense articles or defense services 
valued at $50 million or more must also be notified to the 
Congress for 30 calendar days prior to DTC approval, pursuant to 
AECA Section 3(d)(3).]

36(d) cases. Section 36(d) covers the following cases received by 
DTC:

  --  All applications for Technical Assistance Agreements (TAAs) 
and Manufacturing License Agreements (MLAs) involving the 
manufacture of SME for or in a non-NATO country.

SME is defined in part 120 of the ITAR as articles for which 
special export controls are warranted because of their capacity 
for substantial military utility or capability.  Articles 
designated as SME are preceded by an asterisk on the U.S.  
Munitions List (USML, ITAR Section 121.1).  Additionally, all 
classified defense articles are designated as SME.

The role of Congress.  The AECA requires that Congress be notified 
at least 30 calendar days before the issuance of any license or 
approval covered by Section 36(c).  Though not required by the 
AECA, DTC will also not issue any agreement notified pursuant to 
Section 36(d) until 30 calendar days have elapsed since the date 
of notification.  This provides Congress with an opportunity to 
review these specific commercial defense transactions.  The 
authority to issue licenses and grant approvals, and the 
responsibility to notify Congress when required, have been 
delegated to the Director of DTC.

The AECA provides that licenses for proposed exports covered by 
Section 36(c) may generally not be issued if,  within the 30-day 
notification period, Congress enacts a joint resolution 
prohibiting the proposed export.  It  should be noted that while 
the 30-day notification is still required, a joint resolution may 
not be enacted to prohibit issuance of licenses notified under  
Section 36(c)  for export  to NATO, any member country of NATO, 
Japan, Australia or New Zealand.  In such cases, a law 
specifically prohibiting the export would be required.  Similarly, 
a law would be required to prohibit approval of a case notified 
under Section 36(d).

The review process for  Hill cases.   DTC is making a concerted 
effort, especially in light of the difficult economic situation, 
to be more responsive to the needs of industry in order to enhance 
U.S.  competitiveness abroad.  As a result, DTC is focusing on 
improvements in the timeliness of the licensing review process 
while still taking into full account U.S. national security and 
foreign policy interests.  These efforts certainly apply as well 
to the Congressional notification process.  Clearly, this is 
important since while only 60 of the 92,641 applications received 
in FY91 and FY92 were notified to the Congress, those 60 cases 
represented approximately $6 billion in U.S. defense trade.  
Moreover, although only 30 companies submitted those  60 Hill 
cases, those cases affect hundreds of U.S. subcontractors and 
vendors.

Despite DTC's best efforts, however, exporters still need to plan 
on a lengthy review process for cases requiring Congressional 
notification.  Applications that require Congressional 
notification represent some of DTC's lengthiest cases for three 
main reasons.

First, they are often complicated or controversial cases that 
require extensive interagency review.  Second, these cases are 
sometimes submitted before the final contract is completed and 
signed, resulting in DTC having to hold the case after interagency 
review until the contract is provided.  And third, the review 
process for these cases involves two additional stages not 
included in the review process for other cases.
Congressional notification cases  move through three stages in the 
license review process: (1) DTC and interagency review of the 
case; (2) interagency review of the Congressional notification 
letter; and (3) Congressional notification and related handling. 

Stage one: DTC and interagency case review. The first stage is 
identical to that for all "staffed" cases (i.e., cases referred 
outside of DTC for more detailed technical or policy review).  
This stage involves (a) initial review in DTC, (b) forwarding for 
interagency review, with recommendations sent to DTC by all 
reviewing offices, and (c) final review in DTC, including making a 
final decision based   on the interagency recommendations and 
preparing the final decision letter as required.

For the 27% of DTC's cases that are staffed, the license review 
process ordinarily ends at this point with either the issuance or 
denial of the application.  For Hill cases, however, the process 
is only one-third complete. 

Stage two: interagency notification review. In the second stage of 
the review process, DTC prepares the Congressional notification 
letter and obtains interagency approval of the text of this 
letter.  To save time, the notification letter is drafted while 
the case is undergoing interagency review in stage one.  However, 
since the letter is dependent upon the outcome of stage one, DTC 
does not begin seeking interagency approval of this letter until a 
final decision has been made in stage one.

DTC seeks interagency approval of the draft notification letter 
from four offices: the National Security Council (NSC) and the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) at the White House, and the 
Office of the Legal Advisor (L/PM) and the Office of the Under 
Secretary for International Security Affairs (T) in the State 
Department.  After obtaining interagency approval of the 
Congressional notification letter, DTC prepares the final package 
to be sent to Congress.

Stage three: Congressional notification. In the third stage of the 
review process, DTC forwards the Congressional notification 
package to the State Department's Bureau of Legislative Affairs 
(H), which is responsible for sending the package to the 
appropriate members of Congress.  Once the package is sent to the 
Congress, DTC waits 30 calendar days.  Provided a joint resolution 
prohibiting the export is not enacted by Congress, DTC may issue 
the license on the 31st day.

Special tracking of Hill cases.  In August 1990, DTC created a 
special tracking system for all Hill cases.  Upon arrival in DTC 
and receipt by the appropriate licensing officer, all applications 
are immediately examined to see if they require Congressional 
notification.  If so, a copy of the case is given to the Special 
Projects Licensing Officer (SPLO) in DTC's Arms Licensing Division 
(DTC/ALD), who will then send a letter to the company informing 
them that the case requires Congressional notification.  The  SPLO 
is responsible for tracking Hill cases throughout all three stages 
of the review process to ensure that no case is unnecessarily 
delayed at any point.  As necessary, the SPLO acts to facilitate 
the handling of these cases.

Time frames for each review stage.  For each stage in the review 
process, DTC has set time guidelines.  For the first stage, DTC 
seeks to adhere to the time frames established for all staffed 
cases, whether Hill cases or not.  The first stage deadlines, 
therefore, are not more than 10 business days for initial DTC 
review, not  more than 20 business days for interagency review, 
and 10 business days for final DTC  review.   In stage two, DTC 
has set a deadline of 10 business days for interagency review of 
the draft Congressional notification letter, and five business 
days for preparation of the final Hill package.  In stage three,  
the Bureau of Legislative Affairs (H) handles each case as quickly 
as the individual case and the legislative environment permits.  
DTC then ordinarily issues the license or approves the agreement 
on the first business day after completion of the 30 (calendar) 
day notification period.

A joint effort for further gains.  In an effort to further reduce 
the licensing time, DTC is identifying areas in each stage where 
it can expedite the processing of Hill cases.  Likewise, industry 
can also help facilitate the review of Hill cases.  In addition to 
providing the required information normally submitted with any 
application, it is recommended that applicants provide a cover 
letter stating that they believe the attached case requires 
Congressional notification and why.  This letter should also 
explain the scope of the entire program involved, even if the 
application is only for phase one of a multiple phase program.    
Moreover, it should note delivery schedules, relevant contractual 
obligations, and any other information that might be useful in the 
DTC and interagency review process.  DTC is considering publishing 
a suggested cover letter format in a future issue of Defense Trade 
News.  

Point of contact.  If you have any questions concerning the 
progress of one of your pending DTC cases that requires 
Congressional notification, call the SPLO, at (703) 875-6641.  If 
your question, however, pertains to specific details in the case 
itself, please contact the licensing officer handling the case. 
(###)


ARTICLE 4:

NATO E-3A Related License Applications
Special Procedures for NATO AEW Program

Submit all applications for export licenses for technical data 
and/or hardware that are related to the  NATO E-3A Airborne Early 
Warning (AEW) program directly to:

ESC/INF-B
The Boeing Company
PO Box 3707, Mail Stop 3F-30
Seattle, WA 98124-2207
(NOTE:  This is an address for a U.S. Air Force office located at 
the Boeing Company.

ESC/INF-B will promptly review all license applications received, 
and forward comments and a recommendation regarding approval and 
provisos to the Office of Defense Trade Controls for further 
review and final action.

Please direct  questions to Ms. Melodie  Campbell at  (206) 657-
3030.  (###)


ARTICLE 5:

Rolled Bars And Ammunition Penetrator Blanks 
Differences Defined and Legislation Discussed

Rolled Bars.   A rolled bar is a cylindrical piece of metal with 
no distinguishing marks, indentations  or protrusions which would 
identify it as an ammunition penetrator blank.  Rolled bars 
containing depleted uranium are under the export licensing 
jurisdiction of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 C.F.R. 110), 
even if they are being exported to be manufactured abroad into 
ammunition penetrators.  Rolled bars not containing depleated 
uranium are under the export licensing jurisdiction of the 
Department of Commerce, even if they are being exported to be 
manufactured abroad into ammunition penetrators.

Ammunition Penetrator Blanks.  An ammunition penetrator blank is a 
cylindrical piece of metal with distinguishing marks, indentations 
or protrusions that make it clearly identifiable as a defense 
article.  Ammunition penetrator blanks, including those containing 
depleted uranium, are under the export licensing jurisdiction of 
the Department of State (22 C.F.R. 121.10).

Laws Affecting Export.  Section 551 of Public Law 102-391, dated 
October 6, 1992, a law making appropriations for foreign 
operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 1993, contains the following language 
affecting the export of ammunition and penetrators containing 
depleted uranium:

"None of the funds provided in this or any other Act may be made 
available to facilitate in any way the sale of M-833 antitank 
shells or any comparable antitank shells containing a depleted 
uranium component to any country other than (1) countries which  
are members of  NATO,  (2)   countries which have been designated 
as a major non-NATO ally for purposes of section 1105 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1987 or, (3) 
Taiwan:  Provided, that funds may be made available to facilitate 
the sale of such shells notwithstanding the limitations of this 
section if the President determines that to do so is in the 
national security interest of the United States." 

The following is interpretational guidance for this legislation:

The "funds" referred to in the legislation include not only 
Foreign Military Sales (FMS) credits, but the salaries of U.S. 
Government employees who review commercial export license 
applications.  The legislation applies, therefore, to both 
commercial and government-to-government sales.

The legislation applies only to antitank shells of equal or 
greater performance than the M-833 containing a depleted uranium 
penetrator and to  individual depleted uranium penetrators.  It 
does not apply to antitank shells with a depleted uranium 
penetrator of lesser performance than the M-833, nor does it apply 
to rolled  bars containing depleted uranium, even if they are 
being exported to be manufactured abroad into ammunition 
penetrators.

It is permissible to approve the demonstration of M-833 or 
comparable antitank shells containing a depleted uranium 
penetrator (under the auspices of the appropriate exception to the 
National Disclosure Policy) to a country ineligible to purchase 
such rounds if thedemonstration is for the sole purpose of 
illustrating the suitability of other rounds, such as tungsten, as 
a substitute for M-833 rounds.  Such a demonstration is 
interpreted as furthering rather than defeating the purpose of the 
legislation.

Countries eligible  to receive the M-833 or comparable antitank 
shells containing a depleted uranium penetrator or individual 
depleted uranium penetrators are:

  --  NATO  (Belgium,  Canada,  Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, 
Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, 
Turkey,  and the United Kingdom). 

  --  Major  non-NATO allies for purposes of Section 1105 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1987 
(Australia, Egypt, Israel, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan).

Points of Contact.  For additional information relating to the 
export of these items, contact the appropriate agency and 
individual from the following list:

  --  Department of State
Peter Dade
(703) 875-5677

  --  Department of Defense
Nancy Hindman
(703) 614-7761

  --  Department of Commerce
Jeff Tripp
(202) 482-1309

  --  Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Betty Wright
(301) 504-2342

The point of contact for the contents of this article is Nancy 
Hindman, Department of Defense, (703) 614-7761.   (###)



ARTICLE 6

DOS Reorganizes Export Control Functions
Department of State to Consolidate Export Control Policy and 
Operations in One Bureau

The Department of State (DOS) is closely reviewing export control 
activities and examining alternative ways of organizing these 
functions.  A single bureau, the Bureau of Political Military 
Affairs (PM), may be given responsibility for most of State's 
export control policy and operations.  The functions of the 
Economic Bureau (EB) and the Bureau of Oceans, Environment and 
Science (OES) for nuclear, dual-use, and other export controls 
will be combined with PM's current responsibilities for arms 
exports and non-proliferation.  As the major processor of 
exportlicenses within the Government  [50,000 munitions licenses 
per annum versus 26,000 licenses at  the Department of Commerce 
(DOC)],  PM already exercises export broad control functions.  
After the reorganization, PM would be responsible for:

  --  Licensing the export of defense articles and services,
  --  Coordinating reviews of licenses from DOC and the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission (NRC), and for
  --  Establishing related bilateral and multilateral export 
control policy.

The reorganization is prompted by current unwieldy diffusion of 
export control activities within DOS.  Responsibility for export 
controls is spread across several bureaus, including PM.  
Integration is the key to efficient management of this 
increasingly complex area.  Under the proposed change, State 
Department structure will  be adjusted to reflect the 
reorientation in export controls priorities for strategic trade, 
from the old NATO-Warsaw Pact focus to the new emphasis on 
regional security and nonproliferation.

The State Department's interest is both to prevent exports that 
might contribute to proliferation and to promote legitimate 
exports that help U.S. industry and the economy.  In centralizing 
responsibility for export controls in one bureau, the Department 
hopes to:

  --  Improve the coherence, consistency and efficiency of the 
Department's s export control activities.
  --  Achieve economies of scale and streamline operations in the 
export control field and focus management responsibility for 
export controls within State.
  --  Strengthen efforts at harmonization both in U.S. control 
regimes and in multilateral control arrangements such as the 
Coordinating Committee for Multi-Lateral Export Controls (COCOM), 
the Australia Group, or the Missle Technology Control Regime 
(MTCR).
  --  Develop and maintain a consensus about export controls among 
the business community, Congress and other U.S. agencies.  (###)


ARTICLE 7:

Advisory Opinions
Procedure to Determine Likelihood of Export Approval

Persons desiring information as to whether or not the Office of 
Defense Trade Controls  (DTC) would be likely to approve the 
export of specific defense articles or services to a particular 
country (or countries) are encouraged to use DTC's "Advisory 
Opinion" procedure.

A request for an advisory opinion must be submitted by letter.  It 
must outline in detail the equipment or service, its intended 
usage/application, security classification (if any) of the 
articles or technical data, and the country or countries involved.  
Submit an original and seven copies of the request for advisory 
opinion letter, along with seven copies of descriptive information 
about the defense article, technical data, or defense service.

Applicants are reminded that opinions DTC renders in response to 
requests for advisory opinions are not binding and carry no 
permission to export.  Additionally, these opinions may be revoked 
as international developments occur.

Ed's note:  For additional information on Advisory Opinions, see 
the related article, "Identifying Defense Trade Opportunities:  
Use of Advisory Opinions, Technical Data License and Demonstration 
License" on page 14 of Vol. 2, No. 3, July 1991.   (###)


ARTICLE 8:

Your Current License Status
DTC Licensing Division Staff Aides Provide Information

Applicants wishing to obtain the status of license applications or 
other requests for approval from the Office of Defense Trade 
Controls have a number of options.  Status information can be 
obtained automatically through the Automated License Information 
Status System (ALISS ) from a Touch-Tone phone, or the Remote On-
Line Bulletin Board (ROBB)  via computer and modem.  (See the 
inside back cover of this issue for the telephone numbers to use 
for either of these systems.)  Before accessing  ALISS,  you must 
first obtain your license application number from the License 
Status Staff. 

Additionally, the  DTC License Status Staff can provide 
information on the current status of your license.  

License Status Staff Members are:
--  Shirley C. Shields
--  Anne P. Diemer
--  Beverly A. Parker

Telephone hours for this section are 9 am to 12 noon and 2 to 5 pm 
Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except Federal 
holidays).  The telephone number for the License Status Staff is 
(703) 875-6652. (###)


ARTICLE 9:

OMB Approves Revised Munitions Application Forms
Less Paperwork, Easier to Prepare

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved revised 
munitions license application forms on December 22, 1992. The 
revised forms are the result of extensive government-industry 
consultations and should result in a reduced burden on industry  
while also facilitating the government's role in the regulation of 
defense trade.

The New Line-up. The revised forms are currently being prepared 
for distribution, and should generally be available to applicants 
by the end of April.  The new forms are:

  --  DSP-5 - Application/License for Permanent Export of 
Unclassified Defense Articles and Related Unclassified Technical 
Data. 
  --  DSP-61 - Application/License for Temporary Import of 
Unclassified Defense Articles 
  --  DSP-73 - Application/License for Temporary Export of 
Unclassified Defense Articles.
  --  DSP-85 - Application/License for Permanent/Temporary Export 
or Temporary Import of Classified Defense Articles and Related 
Classified Technical Data. 

In addition to the above revisions of existing forms, OMB has 
approved distribution of a new form:

  --  DSP-119 - Application for Amendment to License for Export or 
Import of Classified or Unclassified Defense Articles and Related 
Technical Data. 

The DSP-119 establishes a uniform procedure for requesting 
amendments to licenses, which should reduce the amount of time 
currently spent by defense firms in preparing amendment requests. 
It will also enable the Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) to 
maintain better control over the processing of amendment requests.

Instructions Clarified. A major improvement of the new forms over 
their predecessors is that instructions have been completely 
rewritten to remove ambiguity and expandedto cover areas that have 
been problems in the past.  Beginning in November 1991, a  
government-industry group conducted a line-by-line analysis of the 
instructions, reviewing them for clarity, completeness and 
uniformity from form to form. The instructions were then revised 
with two major objectives in mind: 

. -- Anticipate questions and problem areas and address them in 
the instructions, and 
  -- Keep the forms simple so that a first-time exporter will be 
able to complete the form without the assistance of an attorney.

Less Paperwork Required. Another objective of the government-
industry consultations was to reduce the paperwork burden on 
applicants wherever it could be done without compromising foreign 
policy or national security considerations. There are a number of 
breakthroughs in this area.

  --  The certification required under Section 126.13 of the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) has been made a 
part of the application (see page 15). 

Although this means that forms must now be signed by empowered 
officials of the applicant, this incorporation eliminates the need 
to submit a separate Section 126.13 certification letter with each 
application. For applicants with a high volume of exporting this 
should result in significant savings.

  -- The certification required under Part 130 of  the ITAR 
regarding political contributions, commissions and fees, when it 
is negative, is also now a part of the application.  If there have 
been contributions, commissions or fees, a separate report must 
still be submitted.

Both of the above certifications can be accomplished on the new 
forms by simply checking the appropriate box the reverse side of 
Copy 1 of the form.

Good-bye Carbon Paper. The new forms will be printed on chemically 
treated carbonless paper, eliminating the messy job of inserting 
the legal size carbon sheets. Applicants will now only have to 
remove  the  instruction sheet,  insert  the form in a typewriter, 
fill it out, sign it, and turn Copy 1 over to check the 
appropriate box on the back before sending it to DTC.

Some Other Changes.  Some design changes were made on the face of 
forms to enable collection of all the information about a proposed  
transaction required to adequately evaluate it from a foreign 
policy and national security standpoint.  At the same time, 
efforts were made to:

   --  Standardize block content and placement on all application 
forms,
  --  Minimize the completion time, and to 
  --  Reduce paperwork to the minimum required.

For the first few months after the forms are made available to the 
public, DTC will continue to supply forms to all requestors. Plans 
are underway, however, to transfer this function to the Government 
Printing Office (GPO).  The tentative date for the change over is 
August 1, 1993, after which applicants must purchase bulk forms 
from one of the 24 GPO. bookstores nation-wide.  DTC will continue 
to provide limited quantities (up to 5 copies) to applicants 
requesting them. Forms ordering information will be provided in a 
future issue of Defense Trade News.  Old versions of the forms can 
continue to be used until they are exhausted.

DTC welcomes user comments on the forms. Written comments can be 
sent to the Executive Editor of Defense Trade News, at the address 
shown on the inside back cover of this issue, or can be datafaxed 
to (703) 875-6647.(###)

Checklist for Using New Munitions Applications Forms

1. Remove the instruction sheet before placing the form in the 
typewriter.  Read the instructions carefully before beginning to 
complete the form.
2. Assemble all required documentation.
3. Type carefully, checking names, descriptions, prices, 
destinations, categories, addresses, etc., for correctness.
4. Complete the face of the form, checking  it for correctness.  
Check the appropriate boxes and sign the certification in the 
lower right hand portion of the form.  The form must be signed by 
an Empowered Official of the Applicant.
5. Turn Copy 1 of the form over to the reverse and check the 
appropriate boxes.

Applications submitted without checkmarks in the appropriate boxes 
on the reverse of Copy 1 will be returned without action to 
applicant.  The signaturor on the face of the form is also 
verifying the information on the reverse.

[NOTE:  The application form mentioned above is not included in 
this electronic version of the Defense Trade News.  Please obtain 
a hard copy of this publication for the application form.] 

ARTICLE 10:

A Guide to Visiting DTC
Dining and Lodging in the Rosslyn Area

Increased Industry presence at DTC.  In response to the DTC 
training seminar program (see Training Form, page 42) offered by 
the Office Of Defense Trade Controls (DTC)  , more out-of-town 
industry personnel are now visiting DTC offices  in Rosslyn, VA.  
To aid these representatives in their lodging and dining needs 
while in the area, DTC contacted the Arlington County Convention 
and Visitors Service.  The following information on restaurants 
and hotels is reprinted from their 1992 Visitors Information 
Package.   Prior to traveling you may receive additional 
information  about attractions and calendar of upcoming events by 
contacting them directly at:

Arlington County Convention & Visitors Service
#1 Courthouse Plaza, Suite 608
2100 Clarendon Blvd.
Arlington, VA 22201
(703) 358-3520

When in town, interested parties may also stop by their offices 
at:

Visitors Center
735 S 18th StreetArlington, VA  22202
(703) 358-5720

Although DTC provides this information for your convenience, we 
assume no responsi-bility for the contents which were provided by 
Arlington County.

The Restaurant Guide
For  the visitor's convenience, the restaurants listed are located 
in the immediate area of the Rosslyn Metrorail station on the 
orange and blue lines, and are all within walking distance of DTC.  
While prices are not listed, a cost guide is given based on the 
purchase of an average entree.   The price ranges  are:  

--  Economical = less than $6; 
-- Moderate = $ 6 - $15; 
--  Higher = greater than $15.

APPETIZER PLUS
1117  N. 19th St
Japanese
Moderate
525-3171

ARLINGTON GRILL
1713  Wilson Blvd.
American/Deli
Economical
527-1508

BELLA VISTA RISTORANTE
1000  Wilson Blvd.   (in USA Today Bldg.)
Northern Italian	
Higher
528-2600

BRASSERIE & COFFEE SHOP
1700  N. Moore St.
American
Moderate
521-1900

GARDEN RESTAURANT
1900  N. Moore St.
Cantonese Chinese
Moderate-Higher
525-5317

COMMONWEALTH CARRYOUT
1300  Wilson Blvd.
Luncheon carryout
Economical
528-1123

DOMINO'S PIZZA
1401  Wilson Blvd.
Moderate
276-1400

FAR EAST RESTAURANT
1401  Wilson Blvd.  (entrance on N. Oak St.)
Chinese
Economical
525-3366

GENERAL'S CLUB  (in Quality Inn Iwo Jima)
1501 Arlington Blvd.
American/Continental
Moderate
841-0391

HOLIDAY INN RESTAURANT (in Holiday Inn Key Bridge)
1850  N. Ft. Myer Dr.
American/Continental
Moderate
522-0400

HUGO'S  (in Hyatt Arlington)
1325  Wilson Blvd.
Italian American
Moderate-Higher
525-1234

HUNAN PALACE
1812  N. Moore St.
Chinese
Moderate
528-8I88

JACKIE'S COOKIE CONNECTION
1700  N. Moore St.
Cookies, muffins, rolls
Economical
276-9404

JON'S COFFEE SHOP
18OO  N. Kent St.
American
Economical
528-4324

KABUL CARAVAN
1725 Wilson Blvd.
Afghan
Moderate
522-8394

LA GROCERIA
1901 N. Moore St., 2nd Floor
Deli & Carryout
Economical
527-8628

LA PIAZZA
1819  N. Lynn St.
Italian/Mexican 
Moderate
528-1323

LA ROSE RESTAURANT
1515  Wilson Blvd.
Cafeteria
Economical-Moderate
525-2900

COPACABANA
1401  Wilson Blvd. 
Mexican/Salvadorian/American
Economical
276-7672

LONE STAR GRILL
1819  N. Lynn St
Tex Mex
Moderate
528-1323

LUCKY PEARL CAFE & CARRYOUT
1111  N. 19th St.
Chinese
Economical-Moderate 
522-9620

LUNCH CORNER
1810  N. Moore St.
Cafeteria
Economical
528-0770

LYNN STREET CAFE
1735  N. Lynn St.
Deli Sandwiches/Carryout 
Economical
525-0384

MANHATTAN DELI
1655  N. Ft Myer Dr.
New York Style Deli
Moderate
527-0066

MARRIOTT CAFE   (in Key Bridge Marriott)
1401  Lee Hwy. 
American/Continental
Moderate
524-6400

MCDONALD'S
1823  N. Moore St.
American Fast food
Economical
528-1259

ORESTE CAFE
1813  N.  Lynn St.
Deli/Subs & Sandwiches 
Economical
522-4455

ORIENT EXPRESS
1700  N. Moore St., 2nd Floor
Chinese-Vietnamese Luncheon Cafeteria
Economical
527-5022

PASTA NOSTRA
1721  Wilson Blvd.
Italian
Moderate
527-5515

PHO 75 RESTAURANT
1711  Wilson Blvd.
Vietnamese
Economical-Moderate
525-7355

QUARTERDECK
1200  N. Ft Myer Dr.
Seafood Crabs/Pizza
Moderate
528-CRAB

RED HOT & BLUE
1600  Wilson Blvd.
American BBQ
Economical-Moderate
276-7427

ROSSLYN CAFETERIA
1701 N. Ft. Myer Dr.
International
Economical
841-0042

ROSSLYN GOURMET
1611  N. Kent St.
New York-Style Deli
Economical
276-0372

ROSSLYN GOURMET DELI
1525  Wilson Blvd.
Carry out sandwiches
Economical
525-1187

ROSSLYN SUBWAY SANDWICH SHOP
1550  Wilson Blvd.
Subs & Salads
Economical
243-3663

ROY ROGERS
1801  N. Moore St.
American Fast Food
Economical
243-4354
SANTA FE CAFE
1500 Wilson Blvd.
Southwest American-Mexican
Moderate
276-0361

SPOUTS RUN (in Hyatt Arlington)
1325  Wilson Blvd.
French Bistro
Moderate
525-1234

STAR OF SIAM OF ROSSLYN 
1735  N. Lynn St.
Thai 
Moderate
524-1207

SZECHUAN GOURMET
1812  N. Moore St.
Hunan & Sechuan Chinese
Moderate
528-8188

THAI HOUSE RESTAURANT
1731-1733  Wilson Blvd.
Thai
Moderate
527-5772

THAI TREAT
1401  Wilson Blvd.
Thai/Oriental
Economical
525-2969

THE CAMBOIAN RESTAURANT
1727  Wilson Blvd.
Cambodian
Moderate
522-3832

THE FAIRFIELD INN (in Key Bridge Marriott)
1401  Lee Hwy.
American
Moderate-Higher
524-6400

THE GREAT EATERY
1000  Wilson Blvd. 
Chinese/ltalian/Deli
Economical
527-2110

THE PAWNSHOP ROSSLYN RESTAURANT
1911  N. Ft. Myer Dr.
American TexMex/Raw Bar
Moderate
522-7400

THE ROSSLYN ROOM RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (in Holiday Inn Key Bridge)
1850  N Ft. Myer Dr.
Continental
Moderate
522-0400

THE VIEW RESTAURANT/LOUNGE (in Key Bridge Marriott)
1401  Lee Hwy.
Continental/American	
Higher
524-6400

TIVOLI RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
1700  N. Moore St.
Italian Evolutionary
Higher
524-8900

TIVOLI GOURMET DELI & PASTRY SHOP
1700  N Moore St.
Deli Sandwiches, Salads & Pastries
Economical-Moderate
524-8904

TOM SARRIS' ORLEANS HOUSE
1213  Wilson Blvd.
American/Prime Rib/Salad Bar
Moderate
524-2929

VANTAGE POINT  (in Rosslyn Westpark)
1900  N. Ft. Myer Dr.
American/Continental
Moderate-Higher	
527-4814

VERANDA LOUNGE (in Key Bridge Marriott)
1401  Lee Hwy.
Sandwiches
Moderate
524-6400

VIET CAMBODIAN RESTAURANT
1727 Wilson Blvd.
Cambodian
Economical
522-3832

VILLAGE BISTRO
1723  Wilson Blvd.
American/Continental
Moderate
522-0284

WEST PARK CAFE  (in Rosslyn Westpark)
1900 N. Ft. Myer Dr.
Economical
527-4814

WHY NOT BOB'S DELI
1401  Wilson Blvd.
Sandwiches
Economical
524-6337

The Hotel Guide

The listed accommodations are located in the immediate vicinity of 
DTC's Rosslyn office, Washington National Airport, the Rosslyn and 
Ballston Metrorail stations, and the Pentagon City and Crystal 
City central business districts.  For current pricing information, 
airport and downtown Rosslyn shuttle services,  and parking 
arrangements, contact the hotel directly.

BED AND BREAKFAST FACILITIES
CRYSTAL BED & BREAKFAST 	
2620   S. Fern Street 
Arlington, Virginia  22202
(703) 548-7652 Phone

MEMORY HOUSE 
6404   N. Washington Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 22205
(703) 534-4607 Phone

BUDGET HOTELS 
AMERICANA HOTEL 
1400   Jefferson Davis Hwy.
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 979-3772 Phone 
(703) 979-0547 Fax 
100 Rooms

CHERRY BLOSSOM TRAVELODGE
3030 Columbia Pike 
Arlington, Virginia 22204
(703) 521-5570 Phone
(703) 271-0081 Fax
76 Rooms

CRYSTAL CITY MOTOR INN
901   S. Clark Street
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 979-1900 Phone
(703) 486-3530 Fax 
46 Rooms

DAYS INN ARLINGTON/ROSSLYN 
2201   Arlington Blvd. 
Arlington, Virginia 22201
(703) 525-0300 Phone
(703) 525-5671 Fax 
129 Rooms

ECONO-LODGE
3335   Lee Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22207
(703) 524-9800 Phone 
55 Rooms

ECONO-LODGE ARLINGTON WEST
6800   Lee Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22213
(703) 538-5300 Phone 
47 Rooms

ECONO-LODGE NAT'L. AIRPORT 
2485 S. Glebe Road 
Arlington,  Virginia 22206
(703) 979-4100 Phone
(703) 979-6120 Fax 
161 Rooms

HIGHLANDER MOTOR INN
3336   Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 22201
(703) 524-4300 Phone
46 Rooms

MOTEL FIFTY
1601 Arlington Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 22209
(703) 524-3400 Phone
38 Rooms

MID-RANGE HOTELS
BEST WESTERN ARLINGTON
2480   S. Glebe Road
Arlington, Virginia 22206
(703) 979-4400 Phone
(703) 685-0051 Fax
325 Rooms

COMFORT INN ARLINGTON/BALLSTON
1211   N. Glebe Road
Arlington, Virginia 22201
(703 )247-3399 Phone
(703) 524-8739 Fax 
126 Rooms

COURTYARD by  MARRIOTT CRYSTAL CITY
2899   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 549-3434 Phone
(703) 549-0320 Fax
272 Rooms

COURTYARD by MARRIOTT  ROSSLYN 
1533  Clarendon Blvd. 
Arlington, Virginia 22209
(703) 528-2222 Phone
(703) 528-1027 Fax 
162 Rooms

DAYS HOTEL CRYSTAL CITY 
2000   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 920-8600 Phone
(703) 920-2840 Fax 
47 Rooms

HOLIDAY INN ARLINGTON at BALLSTON 
4610   N. Fairfax Drive 
Arlington,  Virginia 22203
(703) 243-9800 Phone
(703) 527-2677 Fax 
221 Rooms

HOLIDAY INN KEY BRIDGE 
1850   N. Ft. Myer Drive 
Arlington, Virginia 22209
(703) 522-0400 Phone
(703) 524-5275 Fax 
177 Rooms

HOLIDAY INN NAT'L. AIRPORT 
1489   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 521-1600 Phone
(703) 920-1236 Fax 
308 Rooms

HOWARD JOHNSON NAT'L. AIRPORT
2650   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 684-7200 Phone
(703) 684-3217 Fax 
276 Rooms

QUALITY HOTEL ARLINGTON 
1200    N. Courthouse Road 
Arlington, Virginia 22201
(703) 524-4000 Phone
(703) 524-1046 Fax 
400 Rooms

QUALITY INN IWO JIMA 
1501   Arlington Blvd. 
Arlington, Virginia 22209
(703) 524-5000 Phone
(703) 522-5484 Fax
150 Rooms

ROSSLYN WESTPARK 
1900    N. Ft. Myer Drive 
Arlington, Virginia22209
(703) 527-4814 Phone
(703) 522-7480 Fax 
308 Rooms

SHERATON NATIONAL 
Columbia Pike at Washington Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 22204
(703) 521-1900 Phone
(703) 521-2122 Fax 
431 Rooms

DELUXE HOTELS 
CRYSTAL CITY MARRIOTT 
1999   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia22202
(703) 413-5500 Phone
(703) 413-0185 Fax 
340 Rooms

CRYSTAL GATEWAY MARRIOTT 
1700   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington,  Virginia 22202
(703) 920-3230 Phone
(703) 979-6332 Fax 
700 Rooms

DOUBLETREE HOTEL NAT'L. AIRPORT 
300   Army-Navy Drive 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 892-4100 Phone
(703) 521-0286 Fax 
635 Rooms

EMBASSY SUITES 
1300   Jefferson Davis Hwy.
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 979-9799 Phone
(703) 920-5947 Fax
267 Rooms

HYATT ARLINGTON 
1325   Wilson Blvd.
Arlington,  Virginia 22209
(703) 525-1234 Phone
(703) 525-1476 Fax 
303 Rooms

HYATT REGENCY CRYSTAL CITY 
2799   Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 418-1234 Phone
(703) 418-1233 Fax 
685 Rooms

KEY BRIDGE MARRIOTT HOTEL 
1401   Lee Hwy. 
Arlington,  Virginia 22209
(703) 524- 6400 Phone
(703) 243-3280 Fax 
678 Rooms

RENAISSANCE  HOTEL  - ARLINGTON at BALLSTON METRO CENTER 
950   N. Stafford Street 
Arlington, Virginia 22203
(703) 528-6000 Phone
(703) 528-4386 Fax 
209 Rooms

THE  RITZ CARLTON  - PENTAGON CITY 
1250   S. Hayes Street 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 415-5000 Phone
(703) 41 -5060 Fax 
345 Rooms

SHERATON CRYSTAL CITY 
1800 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 486-1111  Phone
(703) 979-3556 Fax 
197 Rooms

STOUFFER CONCOURSE HOTEL at NAT'L. AIRPORT 
2399 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(703) 418-6800 Phone
(703) 418-3762 Fax 
386 Rooms (###)


ARTICLE 11:


Where in the World Is It?
Using DOS Geographic Regions to Speed Licensing

License applications for some exports (i.e. temporary exports of 
defense articles, and exports of technical data) can contain more  
than  one country  in the block  indicating 'country of ultimate 
destination.'  In order to facilitate the processing of 
applications, however, the Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) 
asks that a separate application be submitted for each major 
geographical region. 

Grouping reduces work load.  To submit a DSP -73 for Temporary 
Export, or a DSP- 5 for Permanent Export of Technical Data for the 
same item to several countries on the same application, 
consolidate these requests onto  a single application.  This  
significantly reduces the work load of  both the applicant and the 
reviewing Bureau.  A service to our readers, we provide the 
following listing of countries and territories, grouped by 
Department of State regional bureau, or geographic region.    (See 
the related listing by country  in "Publications for Exporters".)

Africa - Bureau of African Affairs (AF)
Angola 
Benin
Botswana
British Indian Ocean Territory
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Central African 
Chad Republic
Comoros
Congo
Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast)
Djibouti
Equatorial Guinea
Ethiopia
Gabon
Gambia
Ghana
Guinea-Bissau
Guinea
Kenya
Lesotho
Liberia
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali, Republic of
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mozambique
Namibia
Niger
Nigeria
Rwanda
Sao Tome and Principe
Senegal
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Somalia
South Africa,  Republic of
Sudan
Swaziland
Tanzania
Togo
Uganda
Zaire, Republic of
Zambia
Zimbabwe

East Asia and Pacific Region - Bureau  of East  Asian and Pacific 
Affairs (EAP)
Australia
Brunei
Burma
Cambodia
China, People's 
Cook Islands Republic of
Fiji
French Polynesia
Hong Kong
Indonesia
Japan
Kiribati
Korea, North 
Korea, South
Laos
Macau
Malaysia
Marshall Islands
Micronesia
Mongolia
Nauru
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Pacific Islands, Trust Territory of
Palau
Papua New  Guinea
Philippines
Singapore
Solomon Islands
Taiwan
Thailand
Tonga
Tuvalu
Vanuatu
Vietnam
Western Samoa

Europe and Canada - Bureau of European and Canadian Affairs (EUR)
Albania
Andorra
Armenia +
Austria
Azerbaijan +
Belgium
Bermuda
Bosnia and  Herzegovina *
Bulgaria
Belarus  +
Canada
Croatia *
Cyprus
Czechoslovakia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Georgia +
Germany
Gibraltar
Greece
Greenland
Hungary
Iceland
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Moldova  +
Monaco
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Romania
Russia  +
San Marino
Serbia
Slovak Republic
Slovenia*
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Tajikistan +
Turkey
Turkmenistan +
Ukraine  +
United Kingdom
Uzbekistan +
Vatican
*  formerly Yugoslavia
+ formerly USSR	

The Americas - Bureau of Inter-American Affairs (ARA)
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Columbia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
French Antilles
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Jamaica
Martinique
Mexico
Netherlands Antilles
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Suriname
Trinidad and Tobago
Uruguay
Venezuela

The Near East - Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs (NEA)
Algeria
Egypt
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libya
Morocco
Oman
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Syria
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
Yemen

South Asia - Bureau of South Asian Affairs (SA)
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
Bhutan
India
Maldives
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka  (###)



DEPARTMENTS

ARTICLE 12:

US Customs at DTC
The Automated Export System 


Ed's note:  The following article first appeared in The Exporter, 
January 1992, and is reprinted here in its entirety with 
permission of the publisher.  The  U.S. Customs point of contact 
has been updated to reflect current personnel.

Customs has outlined a program for automating the export process-
in part to collect and admitted $18 million in under-collected 
Harbor Use Fees and to keep in line with their stated goal of 
replacing paper with the electronic transmission of trade data.

Stewart Hauser, representative of the  National Council of Brokers 
and Freight Association (NCBFA), said that "forwarders will play a 
major part in developing the system which will enhance the 
forwarder's role" in the export process.  He commented that all of 
the players are cooperating.  (In fact, the hallmark of U.S. 
Customs Commissioner Hallet's tenure is cooperation between 
Customs and industry.)

Outline of Automated System
Provided by U.S. Customs
In cooperation with other government agencies and the trade 
community, Customs is in the process of developing an automated 
system for electronically collecting export documentation.  This 
documentation includes manifests,  Shippers  Export  Declarations 
(SEDs) , and licenses subject to export controls.

The system, which will be called AES, will eliminate many of the 
current labor intensive manual  processes involved in producing, 
transporting, reviewing and storing export documents.

When all parties to the export shipment transaction are automated, 
Customs envisions the following system flow:

The exporter/shipper will prepare the information for the SED and 
will then transmit that information directly to Customs or Census, 
or will provide the data to his freight forwarder.  If the 
exporter is contracting directly with the carrier, the carrier may 
provide the information through AES or the Census monthly filer 
program if the exporter does not have an automated interface.

The freight forwarder will supply the information needed on the 
house/subhouse bills of lading for each shipment on a specific 
vessel, plane or train.  This information will be added to the SED 
data in the Customs AES system and will form the basis for 
construction the full manifest. 

The carrier will provide the remaining bill of lading information 
including the date and time of  departure for those shipments for 
which  previous information has been received.  In some cases, the 
carrier will provide all the manifest and SED data when the other 
parties to the transaction do not have an automated interface.

The Customs computer system will, using one of the currently 
accepted electronic data interchange standards (EDIFACT, ANSI 
X.12, ARINC, Customs ABI type messages), accumulate data as it 
comes in from various sources, make it immediately available to 
interested government agencies, and eventually build an electronic 
outbound manifest with the associated SED data, including the 
automated decrementing of export licenses for any agency which 
currently imposes export controls, or may do so in the future.

Basic edits and validations will take place to ensure the accuracy 
of data for developing trade statistics; however the goal of the 
system is to expedite, not delay the movement of exported cargo.

The customs inspector will be able, from a central location, to 
review export documentation on a terminal connected to the AES 
system.  Data will be sorted to allow the most efficient use of 
the inspector's time, i.e. licensable commodities will appear 
first, followed by shipments which have not been previously 
reviewed.  The inspector will be able to electronically notify the 
carrier, freight forwarder or exporter of any shipment which needs 
to be inspected.  Exported merchandise will be presumed to be 
released unless one of the parties to the transaction is notified 
differently.

Periodically, Customs will transmit to the Bureau of Census all 
the SED data collected in AES.  Census will use this data as an 
input to their automated system to compile trade statistics for 
exports.

As export licenses are fully decremented through AES, other 
agencies such as the State Department, the Bureau of Export 
Administration (BXA) or the Drug Enforcement Agency will receive 
electronic notification of the transactions which were applied to 
a particular license.

All the data that is collected electronically will be stored in a 
central database which will be available for access by government 
agencies involved in exports.  This database will provide a 
mechanism for assessing trade patterns, validating drawback claims 
and harbor maintenance  fees,  and  establishing time frames for 
the clearance of exported cargo.

For more information, contact Charles Armstrong, U.S. Customs, at 
(202) 376-7000. (###)


ARTICLE 13:

Commodity Jurisdiction Determinations
The following chart provides selected commodity jurisdiction (CJ) 
determinations.  The commodity descriptions are intentionally 
general to ensure the confidentiality of all proprietary 
information related to individual cases. These determinations 
apply only to the specific commodity reviewed in the CJ process.  
If you believe one of your products is  similar to one of those 
listed as having been placed on the Commerce Department's Commerce 
Control List (CCL), please submit a CJ request letter (ITAR 
120.5).  Please refer to the articles "Guidelines for Preparing CJ 
Requests" and "CJs for Mass Market Software" (Vol. 3, No. 4, Oct 
1992) and "Class and Multiple CJ Requests" (Vol. 3, No. 1, Jan 
1992)  for guidance in preparing the CJ request letter.

COMMODITY
JURISDICTION

Ablative Material, Designed for Military and Space Application
USML IV(f)

Accelerometer, Designed for the Oil Industry in Downhole Drilling
CCL 7A94F

Aircraft Engines, Rotary
CCL**

Air Speed Data System, Designed for Military Aircraft
USML VIII(j)

Air Traffic Control Radar, Portable, Ground-Based, Designed for 
Military Application 
USML XI(a)(3)

Airbag Inflators and Seat Belt Tensioners 
CCL 9A96G

Aircraft Engine and Auxiliary Systems Monitoring System 
CCL 7A94F

Algorithm, for Data Encryption, not Incorporated into a  Finished 
Software Product 
USML XIII(b)(1)

Aluminum Alloys Specifically Designed as Armor for Defense 
Articles
USML XIII(d)
In the Form of Plates, Forgings, Castings, Welding Consumables, 
and Rolled and Extruded Shapes That Have Been Specifically 
Designed or  Modified for Defense Articles
USML XIII(d)
Otherwise CCL **

Aluminum Powder, Containing Spherical Particles of 60 Micrometers 
or Less Manufactured from Material with Aluminum Content of  99% 
or More  [See 121.12 (a) (1)]
USML V(a)

Ammunition, Non-Lethal, for Training Purposes 
USML III(a)

Angular Rate Sensor, Designed for Military Application
USML XII(d)

Antennas and Accessories, Commercial
CCL 5A02A

Armor, for Ballistic Protection of Vehicles, Aircraft, & Ships
USML XIII(d)

Automated Teller Machine
CCL Category 5

Automated Voice System, for Use in Banking Applications
CCL 5D13A

Automotive Yaw Sensor
CCL **

Banking Equipment, containing DES for PIN Encryption 
In Object Code
CCL **
In Source Code 
USML XIII(b)(1)

Black Powder, Made with Potassium Nitrate or Sodium Nitrate
CCL **

Bore Sighter
CCL **

Calcium Resinate
CCL **

Compensators, for Firearms
CCL **

Cellular Telephone Monitoring System
USML XI(b)

Ceramic Fiber, Specifically Designed for Military Applications 
USML IV(f)

Circulator, Specifically Designed for Use in an Air-to-Air Missile 
USML IV(h)

Command, Control, Communication, and Intelligence System 
USML XI(a)(5)

Compensators, for Firearms 
CCL **

Computer Programs and Services Related to Naval Vessel Maintenance 
and Logistics 
USML VI(f)

Computer Workstation, Ruggedized and meeting TEMPEST standards 
USML XI(b)(3)

Computer Workstations and Monitors, Ruggedized and Modified for 
Military Application
USML XI(a)

Control Unit, Hand-held, for Industrial Applications 
CCL **

Cooling Unit Not Specifically Designed for Military Use
CCL 2A96G
When Specifically Modified for Use in USML Articles or 
Incorporated into USML Articles
USML Note 1

Countermeasures System, Designed to Detect Eavesdropping Devices
CCL 5A96G

Dehydrator, Designed for a Naval Vessel 
USML VI(b)

Drive Shaft, Designed for Civil and Military Helicopters
CCL 9A94F

Electric Generator Set, Diesel Engine Powered not Designed, 
Modified, or Configured for Military Application
CCL 2A94F

Engines and Their Components, Vehicle 
Those Engines and Their Components That are Not Specifically 
Designed, Modified, or Configured for Military Application
CCL *
Those Engines That are Specifically Designed, Modified, or 
Configured for Military Application
USML VII(g)
Components That are Specifically Designed, Modified, or Configured 
for Military Application
USML VII(h)
Engines That Contain Components That are Specifically Designed, 
Modified, or Configured for Military Application
USML VII(g)

Evaluation Board, for DES chips 
USML XIII(b)(5)

Ferrite Switches, Circulators, and Isolators Specifically 
Designed, Modified, or Configured for Military or Space 
Application 
USML Note 1
Radiation Hardened to Meet or Exceed All of the Following 
Radiation Hardening Levels:
      Total Dose     5 X 10 EXP 5 Rads (SI )
      Dose Rate Upset     5 X 10 EXP 8 Rads (SI)/Sec.
      Single-Event Upset     1 X 10 EXP 7 Error/Bit/Day
      Neutron     1 X 10 EXP 14 N/cm2
      Latch-Up     Latch-up Free
Otherwise
CCL 3A96

Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Chip, Not Designed for Military Application 
CCL **

Frequency Agile Magnetron Tubes & Components
USML XI(d)

Frequency Agile Signal Simulator
USML XI(b)

Fuel cell Power Plant, Specifically Designed for the Space Shuttle 
USML VIII(i)

Related Technical Data
USML VIII(k)

Fuel cell Power System, for Manned Submersible 
CCL 8A02A

Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits 
(MMICs) in the 2-25 GHz Range Utilizing 0.5 Micron Ion-Implanted 
MESFET and  PIN Diode Technologies
CCL **

Technical Data Relating to the Manufacture and Production of These 
GaAs MMICs 
USML XI(e)

Glass, Designed for Nuclear Weapons Applications 
USML XVI(a)

Gloves Designed to Protect Against Chemical and Biological Warfare 
Agents 
USML X(c)

Designed for Commercial Industrial Use
CCL OA96G

GPS Receiver Engine, C/A Code, Designed for Use by Commercial 
Airlines 
CCL 7A94F

Ground Station for Remote Sensing Satellite
USML VIII(j)

Gyro Stabilizers and Accessories, Designed for Commercial 
Application
CCL Category 7

Gyro, Designed for Military Application 
USML XII(d)

Hardware, Employing Encryption for Access Control and Copy 
Protection Only
CCL 5AllA

Headsets, Modified for Military Aircraft Applications
USML X(a)

Ignitors, Specifically Designed for Fireworks
CCL **

Image Generator, Part of a Training Simulator System
CCL **

Infrared Imaging Systems, Configured for Military Use
USML XII(c)

Initiators, Electrical, Designed for Automotive Airbag Restraint 
Systems
CCL **

Integrated Circuits, Specifically Designed for a Military Radio
USML XI(d)

Kevlar In fiber, fabric, or yarn form
CCL lC96G

Kevlar products specifically designed, modified, or configured for 
military application
USML Note 1

Kevlar products not specifically designed, modified, or configured 
for military application
CCL **

Klystrons, Specifically Designed for Medical Application
CCL 3A96G

Lead Styphnate
CCL **

Lens, Specifically Designed for Gen II and Gen III Image 
Intensification Tubes
USML XII(f)

Liner, for Military and Commercial Helmets
CCL **

Magnetometers, Not Designed for Military Application 
CCL 6A06A

Magnetrons, Designed for Commercial Weather Radar  Applications 
CCL 3A96G

Measurement Device, Vibration/Shock, Not Designed for Military 
Application 
CCL 3A96G

Miniature Incandescent Lamps
CCL OA96G

Monitors, Ruggedized and Meeting TEMPEST Standards
USML XI (b)(3)

MOSFETS, Radiation-Hardened, Designed for Civil Space Applications
USML XI(d)

Navigation and Test Equipment, Designed for Naval Vessels
USML VI(b)

Night Vision Viewer, Using a Gen 1 Image Intensifier Tube
CCL 6A96G

Oceanographic Research Vessel
CCL **

Photo-multiplier Tubes Specifically Designed for Military 
Application
USML XII(f
Not Specifically Designed for Military Application 
CCL 6A96G

PIN Selection System, for Use in Banking Applications 
CCL 5AllA

Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (KTP) Crystals Unfinished or Rough 
Finished Crystals
CCL 6A96G
Finished Crystals not Specifically Designed for Military 
Application 
CCL 6A96G
Finished Crystals Specifically Designed for Military Application 
USML Note 1

Potentiometer, Not Designed for Military Application 
CCL 3A96G

Power Amplifier, Designed for Use in Missile Development
USML XI(a)(7)

Power Conditioner, Allowing Military Headsets to Operate Within 
TEMPEST Standards
USML XI(b)(3)

Propellant Test and Production Equipment
CCL **

Radar Coolant, Designed for use in Military Radars
USML XI(d)

Radar Simulator, Designed for Military Training
USML IX(a)

Radar Video Mapper
CCL 6A96G

RF and Microwave Filters Specifically Designed, Modified, or 
Configured for Military or Space Application
USML Note 1
Radiation Hardened to Meet or Exceed All of the Following 
Radiation Hardening Levels:
        Total Dose     5 X 10 EXP 5 Rads (SI )
        Dose Rate Upset     5 X 10 EXP 8 Rads (SI)/Sec.
        Single-Event Upset     1 X 10 EXP 7 Error/Bit/Day
        Neutron     1 X 10 EXP 14 N/cm2
        Latch-Up     Latch-up Free
Otherwise
CCL **

Receiver System for Ground Station, for Remote Sensing Satellite
USML VIII(j)

Recoil Reduction Spring Systems, for Firearms 
USML I(a)

Refrigeration Technology, Not Designed for Military Application
 CCL **

Satellite Video Receivers, containing Descrambler Modules Without 
Digital Encryption and Where Digital Decryption is Limited to 
Video, Audio,  and Management Functions
CCL Category 5

Sealant, not Specifically Designed for Military Application
CCL  lC96G

Services, Relating to Data Encryption  and Key Management
USML XIII(k) 

Shelter and Shelter Vans Not Incorporating USML Articles or 
Features
CCL **

Shipboard Combustion Control Systems, Parts and Components  
Specifically Designed, Modified, or Configured for Naval Vessels
USML VI(b)
Not Specifically Designed, Modified, or Configured for Naval 
Vessels  
CCL  8A18A & 8A94F

Simple Analog Scrambler 
CCL 5AllA

Smokeless Powder
USML V(c)
Software Development System, Targeted for Military Computers
USML XI(d)

Software, Atmospheric Modeling
CCL 4D96G

Software, Designed for Military Data Collection and Analysis
USML XXI(b)

Software, Designed for Military Training Applications 
USML IX(c)

Software, Designed for Radar Tracking, Command and Control, and 
Battlefield Communications
USML XI(e)

Software, Designed for the Development of Stealth Technology 
USML XIII(k)

Software, Electronic Mail
CCL **

Software, Employing Encryption for Access Control and 
Authentication only 
CCL **

Software, for Analysis of Impact Dynamics
CCL 4D96G

Software, for Field Repairs, with Data Encryption 
In Object Code
CCL **
In Source Code
USML XIII(b)(1)

Software, Photogrammetric, for Civil Application
CCL  4D96G

Software, Precision Signal Generator 
USML XI(b)

Software, Radar Simulator
USML XI(b)

Software, Used in Counseling & Training Programs 
CCL 5D13A

Software, Using DES for Data Encryption
USML XIII(b)(1)

Software, Using DES for Password Encryption In Object Code
CCL **
In Source Code
USML XIII(b)(1)

Software, Using Encryption for Access Control only
CCL **

Sonar, Not Specifically Designed for Military Application
CCL Category 6

Steel, Scrap, Cut from Submarine Hulls
CCL lC96G

Strategic Military Telecommunications System, Designed to be 
Secure and Survivable
USML XI(a)(5)

Surface Effect Ship (SES) Vessel
CCL **

TACAN Beacon Simulators
CCL **

Technical Data Related to a Military Helicopter
USML VIII(k)

Television Broadcast System with Data Encryption Capability 
USML XIII(b)(1)

Test Equipment, for Voltage Measurement
CCL 3A93F

Testing Programs, Related to the Space Shuttle
USML VIII(k)

Trainer, Specifically Designed to Simulate Navy Frigates
USML IX(c)

Transmitter and Receiver System, Designed for Commercial Air-
Traffic Control Applications 
CCL **

Unexploded Ordnance Detection System
USML IV(c)

Uniforms, Designed to Protect Against Chemical Warfare Agents 
USML X(c)

Videographic Reader, for Verification of Seals/Anti-Tampering
CCL **

Workstation, Designed for the Analysis of Environmental Data
CCL **

Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate
CCL lC96G

Zirconium Potassium Perchlorate
USML V(a)

Note 1: USML category is the same as the item for which this part 
or component was designed.
**  A specific Export Commodity Classification Number (ECCN) was 
not provided by the Department of Commerce.  For the ECCN number, 
please file a commodity classification request with the Bureau of 
Export Administration (BXA), Department of Commerce, P.O. Box 273, 
Washington, DC 20044. (###)


ARTICLE 14:

Personnel Updates
Michael H. Newlin is currently the acting Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Export Control in the Bureau of Political Military 
Affairs, and also the acting director of the Office of Defense 
Trade Policy.   Prior  to coming  on  board, Ambassador Newlin 
served as Deputy Executive Chairman of the UN Special Commission 
on Iraq. He has also been Ambassador to several UN agencies in 
Vienna, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the State 
Department Bureau of Consular Affairs, and ambassador to Algeria. 
He joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 1952, and has served atposts  
in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Washington, and at the UN in 
New York.

LCDR Glenn E. Smith reported to the Office of Defense Trade 
Controls (DTC) in November 1992,   replacing   LCDR  Will  Massie.  
LCDR Smith recently completed a tour as the Commissioning First 
Lieutenant aboard the USS RUSHMORE (LSD-47). LCDR Smith has also 
served a board  USS FORD (FFG-54), USS  CURTIS   (FFG-38), and USS 
BELLEAU-WOOD (LHA-3).  As a licensing officer in the Arms 
Licensing Division (ALD), he is responsible for reviewing 
Technical Assistance Agreements (TAAs) and Manufacturing Licensing 
Agreements (MLAs).

MAJ Robert S. Kovac reported to DTC  in February 1993 after 
serving as the Inspector General  at Ft.  Buchanan, Puerto Rico.  
A Command and General Staff College graduate and Infantry Officer 
with a specialty in Operations, MAJ Kovac has served at Ft. Lewis, 
WA, Ft. Bragg, NC, and also in Germany and Korea.  In ALD, MAJ 
Kovac responsible for TAAs  and MLAs.  (###)


Category Assignments
Aerospace & Ordnance Branch Update

The October 1992 issue of  Defense Trade News contained an article 
"All About Contacting DTC: Principle Sections and Phone Numbers of 
the Office of Defense Trade Controls".  The information which 
follows updates the information on pages 27-28 in regards to USML 
Category  assignments.   The Licensing Officers also handle 
applications for both technical data and components of the 
equipment in their assigned categories. Phone numbers remain as 
previously published.

Carolyn  Lancaster
Companies A - L
  Cat. VIII(a) - Fixed Wing Aircraft 
  Cat. VIII(d) - Launching & Recovery Equipment 
  Cat. VIII(f) - Developmental Aircraft 

Companies D, I, U
  Cat. I(a)-(d) 
  Cat. III(a)-(e) 

Terry  Hunter 
Companies M - Z
  Cat. VIII(a) - Fixed Wing Aircraft 
  Cat. VIII(d) - Launching & Recovery Equipment 
  Cat. VIII(f) - Developmental Aircraft 

Companies G, H
  Cat. I(a)-(d) 
  Cat. III(a)-(e)

Suzanne Palmer 
Companies A - Z
  Cat.IV(a) - Torpedoes 
  Cat.V (a)-(f) - Explosives, Fuel Thickeners,  Propellants, 
Pyrotechnics, Compounds 
  Cat.VIII(e) - Inertial Navigation Systems 
  Cat.XII(d) - Inertial Platforms & Sensors,
    Astrocompasses, Star Trackers, 
    Accelerometers, Gyros

Companies C
  Cat.I(a)-(d) 
  Cat.III(a)-(e) 

Ken Peoples 
Companies A - L
  Cat. IV (a)-(g) - Rockets, Grenades, Depth Charges, Missile 
Launchers, Demolition Blocks, Blasting Caps, Missile & Anti-
missile Systems, Excavating Devices, Ablative Materials 
  Cat. XV(a)-(f) - Spacecraft, Remote Sensing Satellite Systems, 
Communications Satellites, Global Positioning Systems

Companies S, T
  Cat. I(a)-(d) 
  Cat. III(a)-(e)

Terry  Davis
Companies M - Z
  Cat. IV (a)-(g) - Rockets, Grenades, Depth Charges, Missile 
Launchers, Demolition Blocks, Blasting Caps, Missile & Anti-
missile Systems, Excavating Devices, Ablative Materials 
  Cat. XV(a)-(f) - Spacecraft, Remote Sensing Satellite Systems, 
Communications Satellites, Global Positioning Systems

Companies A, B, F
  Cat. I(a)-(d)
  Cat. III(a)-(e)

Sue Clark
Companies A - Z
  Cat.II(a)-(d) - Guns over .50 Cal.., Howitzers, Mortars, 
Recoilless Rifles, Flamethrowers, Projectors 
  Cat.IV(a) - Mines, Bombs 
  Cat.X(a)-(e) - Body Armor, Helmets, Partial Pressure Suits, 
Liquid Oxygen Converters, Protective Apparel & Equipment 
  Cat. XIV(a)-(f) - Chemical Agents, Tear Gas, Biological Agents, 
Dissemination &  Detection Equipment, Nuclear Radiation Detection 
& Measuring Equipment 
  Cat.XVI(a)-(c) - Nuclear Weapons & Nuclear Explosive Related 
Articles

Companies E, V, W, X, Y, Z
  Cat.I(a)-(d) 
  Cat.III(a)-(e)

Carol Basden
Companies A - L
  Cat.VIII(a) - Helicopters, Non-expansive Balloons, Drones
  Cat.VIII(b) - Aircraft Engines
  Cat.VIII(c) - Cartridge Actuated Devices
  Cat.VIII(g) - Ground Effect Machines

Companies J, K, L, M
  Cat.I(a)-(d) 
  Cat.III(a)-(e) 

Peter Dade
Companies M - Z
  Cat.VIII(a) - Helicopters, Non-expansive Balloons, Drones
  Cat.VIII(b) - Aircraft Engines
  Cat.VIII(c) - Cartridge Actuated Devices
  Cat.VIII(g) - Ground Effect Machines

Companies N, O, P, Q, R
  Cat.I(a)-(d) 
  Cat.III(a)-(e)        (###)


ARTICLE 15:

Tips and Tidbits

Additional Electronic Distribution
Defense Trade News is now available on the Federal Bulletin Board 
(BBS) from the U.S. Government Printing Office.  BBS is a low-cost 
service which is easy to access and use.  Defense Trade News  is 
located in the Library File DOS MISC.   To browse the BBS at no 
charge, dial (202) 512-1387.  For additional information about 
this GPO service, contact the Office of Electronic Information 
Dissemination Services on (202) 512-1524.  To open a GPO Deposit 
Account, call (202) 512-1530 or FAX (202) 512-1262.

Extra Copies of Attachments Needed
In an effort to expedite processing of license applications, the 
Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) has instituted new 
procedures to process incoming applications and get them into the 
hands of licensing officers faster. In order to successfully 
implement the new procedures, however, applicants will be required 
to submit an original and three copies of ALL attachments such as 
commodities, foreign consignees and freight forwarders. DTC still 
requires seven copies of all technical data and brochures. When 
the new processing system is fully implemented, applications 
without the required number of attachments will be returned to 
applicants without further processing. DTC offers apologies for 
any inconvenience caused by the new procedure, but asks every 
applicant's cooperation and understanding. The new system should 
result in faster turn around time for the vast majority of 
applications.

Enhancements to ROBB
DTC's Remote On-Line Bulletin Board (ROBB) has some new 
enhancements.  In addition to the license status information, a 
message board has been added.  It features Federal Register 
Notices, announcements, and advisories of interest to exporters.   
Reference tables have also been added.  They include lists of 
license officers and agencies to which cases are staffed.

CJ's
If an exporter believes that an item is covered by  both the 
Commerce Control List (CCL) and the USML, please check with the 
the Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) to see if those 
commodities have been reviewed through a commodity jurisdiction 
process.  Seeking this information is preferrable to waiting for 
U.S. Customs to officially inquire while products are held in 
detention.

Note from the Editor
Since March 1990,  Defense Trade News  has been written and edited 
by personnel of the Bureau of Political Military Affairs, with 
layout and printing done outside the bureau. Last year, we decided 
to enter the ranks of desktop publishers and do all except the 
printing in-house. The new equipment arrived in December, and we 
have been busy since that time setting up and learning how to 
operate it.  This took a bit longer than we anticipated, thus the 
January issue was delayed.  Rather than skip an issue, we decided 
to go with a larger combined January-April issue.  The editorial 
staff apologizes for the delay, but hope that the volume you are 
currently reading was worth the wait.   (###)


ARTICLE 16:

Publications for Exporters
Cross Reference of Countries and Bureaus

In conjunction with the centerfold  article "Where in the World is 
It?", the following list of countries, country codes, and 
geographic bureaus will prove to be a valuable tool for exporters.  
This section is perforated for easy tear-out, perhaps to be added 
to your ITAR  and ROBB notebooks.

Grouping reduces work load.  To submit a DSP -73 for Temporary 
Export of Equipment, or a DSP- 5 for Permanent Export of Technical 
Data to several countries on the same application, applicants may 
prepare one application for each Department of State (DOS) Bureau.  
Consolidating these requests onto  a single application 
significantly reduces the work load of both the applicant and the 
reviewing Bureau.

Submitting multiple-country licenses. Look up each country on the 
alphabetical list on this and the following pages.  Group 
countries by the geographic region.  List all countries by the 
official name (do not use Country Codes) in Block 3 of the DSP-5 
for Permanent Export of Technical Data, or Block 4 of the DSP-73 
for Temporary Export of Equipment. 

Other-than-Country Information.  As you scan the list, you will 
notice that areas not recognized as countries may, in fact, have 
both a Country Code and an assignment to a DOS Bureau.  For 
example, Puerto Rico (RQ) is under the purview of the Bureau of 
Inter-American Affairs (ARA).  Although Puerto Rico is a U.S. 
territory and, therefore, requires no license for export issues in 
Puerto Rico can effect regional affairs.  Consider the British 
Virgin Islands (VI), also assigned to ARA.  Although, a British 
territory, exports to the Vigin Islands are not reviewed by the 
Bureau of European Affairs (EUR),. but by ARA.  These cases 
usually occur when the area, although an official part of a 
specific country, is located in a geographic region other than 
that of the country itself.

Use of the Country Code.  Registrants who electronically access 
the current status of their license applications on DTC's Remote 
	On-Line Bulletin Board (ROBB) will find the Country Codes 
useful.  Whenever you query the database, you may query for all 
licenses to a specific country.  

COUNTRY NAME     COUTRY CODE     DOS BUREAU
Afghanistan     AF     SA
Albania (1)     AL     EUR
Algeria         AG     NEA
American Samoa  AQ     EAP
Andorra         AN     EUR
Angola (1)      AO     AF
Anguilla        AV     ARA
Antarctica      AY     EAP
Antigua and Barbuda     AC     ARA
Argentina       AR     ARA
Armenia (former USSR) (1)     AM     EUR
Australia       AS     EAP
Austria         AU     EUR
Azerbaijan (former USSR) (1)     AJ     EUR
Bahamas, The    BF     ARA
Bahrain         BA     NEA
Bangladesh      BG     SA
Barbados        BB     ARA
Belarus (former USSR) (1)     BO     EUR
Belgium         BE     EUR
Belize          BH     ARA
Benin           BN     AF
Bermuda         BD     EUR
Bhutan          BT     SA
Bolivia         BL     ARA
Bosnia and Herzegovina (former Yugoslavia)     BK     EUR
Botswana        BC     AF
Brazil          BR     ARA
British Indian Ocean Territory     IO     AF
Brunei          BX     EAP
Bulgaria (1)    BU     EUR
Burkina Faso    UV     AF
Burma           BM     EAP
Burundi         BY     AF
Cambodia (1)    CB     EAP
Cameroon        CM     AF
Canada          CA     EUR
Cape Verde      CV     AF
Cayman Islands  CJ     ARA
Central African Republic     CT     AF
Chad            CD     AF
Chile           CI     ARA
China, People's Republic of     CH     EAP
Christmas Island     KT     EAP
Cocos (Keeling) Islands     CK     EAP
Columbia        CO     ARA
Comoros         CN     AF
Congo           CF     AF
Cook Islands    CW     EAP
Costa Rica      CS     ARA
Cote d'Ivoire (see Ivory Coast)     IV     AF
Croatia (former Yugoslavia)     HR     EUR
Cuba (1)(3)     CU     ARA
Cyprus          CY     EUR
Czech Republic  EZ     EUR
Czechoslovakia  CZ     EUR
Denmark         DA     EUR
Djibouti, Republic of     DJ     AF
Dominica        DO     ARA
Dominican Republic     DR     ARA
Ecuador         EC     ARA
Egypt           EG     NEA
El Salvador     ES     ARA
Equatorial Guinea     EK     AF
Estonia (1)     UR     EUR
Ethiopia        ET     AF
Falkland Islands     FA     ARA
Faroe Islands   FO     EUR
Federated States of Micronesia (see Micronesia)     FM     EAP
Fiji            FJ     EAP
Finland         FI     EUR
France          FR     EUR
French Guiana   FG     ARA
French Polynesia     FP     EAP
French South and Antarctic Lands     FS     EAP
Gabon           GB     AF
Gambia          GA     AF
Georgia (former USSR) (1)     GG     EUR
Germany         GE     EUR
Ghana           GH     AF
Gibraltar       GI     EUR
Greece          GR     EUR
Greenland       GL     EUR
Grenada         GJ     ARA
Guadeloupe      GP     ARA
Guatemala       GT     ARA
Guinea          GV     AF
Guinea-Bissau     PU     AF
Guyana          GY     ARA
Haiti           HA     ARA
Heard and McDonald Islands     HM     EAP
Honduras        HO     ARA
Hong Kong       HK     EAP
Hungary         HU     EUR
Iceland         IC     EUR
India           IN     SA
Indonesia       ID     EAP
Iran (3)        IR     NEA
raq (3)         IZ     NEA
Ireland         EI     EUR
Israel          IS     NEA
Italy           IT     EUR
Ivory Coast     IV     AF
Jamaica         JM     ARA
Japan           JA     EAP
Jordan          JO     NEA
Kazakhstan (former USSR) (1)     KZx     EUR
Kenya           KE     AF
Kiribati        KR     EAP
Korea, North (1), (3)     KN     EAP
Korea, South    KS     EAP
Kuwait          KU     NEA
Kyrgyzystan (former USSR) (1)     KG     EUR
Laos            LA     EAP
Latvia (1)      UR     EUR
Lebanon         LE     NEA
Lesotho         LT     AF
Liberia         LI     AF
Libya (3)       LY     NEA
Liechtenstein   LS     EUR
Lithuania (1)   UR     EUR
Luxembourg      LU     EUR
Macau           MC     EAP
Macedonia       MK     EUR
Madagascar      MA     AF
Malawi          MI     AF
Malaysia        MY     EAP
Maldives        MV     SA
Mali, Republic of     ML     AF
Malta           MT     EUR
Marshall Islands, Republic of     RM     EAP
Martinique      MB     ARA
Mauritania      MR     AF
Mauritius       MP     AF
Mexico          MX     ARA
Micronesia, Federated States of     FM     EAP
Midway Islands  MQ     EAP
Moldova (former USSR) (1)     MD     EUR
Monaco          MN     EUR
Mongolia (1)    MG     EAP
Montenegro      MW     EUR
Montserrat      MH     ARA
Morocco         MO     NEA
Mozambique      MZ     AF
Namibia         WA     AF
Nauru           NR     EAP
Navassa Island  BQ     ARA
Nepal           NP     SA
Netherlands     NL     EUR
Netherlands Antilles     NA     ARA
New Caledonia   NC     EAP
New Zealand     NZ     EAP
Nicaragua       NU     ARA
Niger           NG     AF
Nigeria         NI     AF
Norfolk Islands     NF     EAP
Northern Mariana Islands     CQ     EAP
Norway          NO     EUR
Okinawa         JAv     EAP
Oman            MU     NEA
Pacific Islands, Trust Territory     PS     EAP
Pakistan        PK     SA
Panama          PM     ARA
Papau New Guinea     PP     EAP
Paraguay        PA     ARA
Peru            PE     ARA
Philippines     RP     EAP
Poland          PL     EUR
Portugal        PO     EUR
Puerto Rico     RQ     ARA
Qatar           QA     NEA
Reunion         RE     AF
Romania (1)     RO     EUR
Russia (former USSR) (1)     XX     EUR
Rwanda          RW     AF
San Marino      SM     EUR
Sao Tome and Principe     TP     AF
Saudi Arabia    SA     NEA
Serbia          SR     EUR
Senegal         SG     AF
Seychelles      SE     AF
Sierra Leone    SL     AF
Singapore       SN     EAP
Slovak Republic LO     EUR
Slovenia (former Yugoslavia)     SI     EUR
Solomon Islands BP     EAP
Somalia         SO     AF
South Africa, Republic of (2)     SF     AF
Spain           SP     EUR
Sri Lanka       CE     SA
St. Helena      SH     AF
St. Kitts and Nevis-Anguilla     SC     ARA
St. Lucia       ST     ARA
St. Pierre and Miquelon     SB     EUR
St. Vincent     VC     ARA
Sudan           SU     AF
Suriname        NS     ARA
Svalbard and Jan Mayen     JS     EUR
Swaziland       WZ     AF
Sweden          SW     EUR
Switzerland     SZ     EU
Syria (3)       SY     NEA
Taiwan          TW     EAP
Tajikistan (former USSR) (1)     TI     EUR
Tanzania        TZ     AF
Thailand        TH     EAP
Togo            TO     AF
Tokelau         TL     EAP
Tonga           TN     EAP
Trinidad and Tobago     TD     ARA
Trust Terr. of Pacific Islands (see Pacific Islands)
Tunisia         TS     NEA
Turkey          TU     EUR
Turkmenistan (former USSR) (1)     TX     EUR
Turks and Caicos Islands     TK     ARA
Tuvalu          TV     EAP
Uganda          UG     AF
Ukraine (former USSR) (1)     UP     EUR
United Arab Emirates     TC     NEA
United Kingdom  UK     EUR
United Nations  UN     N/A
United States Miscellaneous Pacific Islands     IQ     EAP
Uruguay         UY     ARA
Uzbekistan (former USSR) (1)     UZ     EUR
Vanuatu         NH     EAP
Vatican         VT     EUR
Venezuela       VE     ARA
Vietnam (1)     VM     EAP
Virgin Islands, British     VI     ARA
Virgin Islands, U.S.     VQ     ARA
Wake Island     WQ     EAP
Wallis and Futuna     WF     EAP
Western Sahara  WI     AF
Western Samoa   WS     EAP
Yemen           YM     NEA
Yugoslavia      YO     EUR
Zaire, Republic of     CG     AF
Zambia          ZA     AF
Zimbabwe        ZI     AF


ARTICLE 17:

Reader Questionnaire

Dear Reader,

As we begin the new year, we'd like to get a sense of how we at 
Defense Trade News. did during the past year, and what you'd like 
to see us do in the future.  Please  complete this survey and 
return as soon as possible. The results will be published in an 
upcoming issue.

1.  The agency/organization receiving this publication is (Check 
all that apply): 
____ Manufacturing  ____ Exporter  ____ Attorney ____Consultant  
____ Freight Forwarder ____  U.S. Embassy  ____ U.S. Customs    
____ U.S. Armed Forces  ____ Other U.S. Government Agency
____ Other (Please specify)_____________________________

2.  Your position or title within the agency/organization:  
______________________________________________

3.  Approximate number of people who read this copy of Defense 
Trade News: (Check only one)
_____ 1 - 5     _____  6 - 10     _____  11 - 20      _____  20 + 

4.  How many articles do you read in each issue?
_____  100 % _____  75 %     _____  50 %         _____  25 %     
_____  Less than 25 % 

5.  Article length is generally:  
_____  Too long_____  About right_____  Too short

6.  Article content is generally:
_____  Too complex     _____  About Right    _____  Too simple

7.  Articles are generally:
_____   Useful and interesting        _____  Useful but not 
interesting
_____   Interesting but not useful    _____  Neither interesting 
or useful

8.  Publication  frequency is:
____  Too often ____ About right____ Too infrequent

Note:  This is a quarterly publication (Jan., Apr., July, Oct.).

9.   If GPO distributed  Defense Trade News by subscription,  
would your agency/organization subscribe?
_____  Yes     _____  No     _____  Don't know

10.   If you subscribed, how many copies would your agency/ 
organization require?   _____ copies.

11.  Please score the following topics or columns according to 
your interest:
1  Very Interested
2  Somewhat interested
3   Slightly interested
4   Not interested

____ Defense Trade Policy
____ Trade Legislation
____ Compliance Cases &Tips
____ DTC Procedures
____ Licensing Procedures
____ Federal Register Notices
____ US Customs at DTC
____ Personnel Updates
____ Tips & Tidbits
____ Publications for Exporters
____ Commodity Jurisdiction Determinations
____ Summaries of Prosecuted Court Cases 
____  OTHER  (Please Specify)  
____________________________________________________

12.  Rate Defense Trade News on each of the following categories:
                        Excellent      Good     Fair     Poor
Overall Quality____     ____     ____     ____
Writing Style  ____     ____     ____     ____
Content           ____     ____     ____     ____
Appearance     ____     ____     ____     ____

13.  On what subject (s) would you like to see articles in 1993?  
_________________________________________

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:  






(###)

Training--Relief Is Just A Letter Away
Are export procedures giving  you or your employees headaches?  
The Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) can design a seminar on 
export licensing policies and procedures with your specific needs 
in mind.  Seminars are held in DTC's main conference room on the 
second floor at 1701 N. Fort Myer Drive, Arlington, VA.

DTC normally holds two seminars per month if demand warrants.  
Seating constraints limit attendance to 30 people per seminar.  
Normal training sessions are half-day, but they can be extended 
according to the needs of the participants.   Small companies are 
encouraged to apply  for these training sessions.  We combine 
participants from different companies each month to make up a 
session.  Larger companies might have enough personnel to take up 
all of the available spaces in a session, in which case, we will 
schedule a special session for that company.

In order to request a training seminar, please complete the 
application below and return it to DTC.

1.Type(s) of Training Desired:
_____Completion of Applications
_____Registration Requirements
_____Country Licensing Policies     
_____Congressional Requirements
_____COCOM Requirements     
_____Agreement Requirements
_____US Customs EXODUS Program     
_____Commodity Jurisdiction Requests
_____Processing of Requests     
_____Licensing Foreign Nationals


Other subject areas you wish covered:  
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_________________________________

2.  Number of individuals wishing to attend from your firm. 
_______

3.  Please list the primary U.S. Munitions List category(ies) of 
defense articles, services, and/or technical data in which your 
firm usually deals.

1.  __________     2.  __________      3.  __________ 
4.  __________

4.  Name of Company/Individual  
_____________________________________________________
DTC Registration Code   ________________ - _________
Address   ____________________________________________
City &  State,  ZIP   
____________________________________________________
Point of Contact   
____________________________________________________
Phone  (           )  ________-________________ Direct Line
(           )  ________-________________ DataFax

5.  Would your company be interested in briefing DTC about your 
products or services?
  ______   Yes ______   No 

(###)

[END OF DEFENSE TRADE NEWS, VOLUME 4, NUMBERS 1 AND 2]

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